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This is a discussion on Alarming Information within the Freshwater and Tropical Fish forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by MrWynO14 You sure do give a lot of good detail. Here's another thought. If I were to take a hose and ...

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Old 05-23-2010, 01:10 AM   #11
 
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Originally Posted by MrWynO14 View Post
You sure do give a lot of good detail. Here's another thought. If I were to take a hose and start a siphon to take water out of the tank, and at the same time take a hose from my faucet and re-add the water at the same time its siphoning out, would this be a good way to keep an over stocked tank? I'm thinking of letting this run until the water is 100 percent new water, and obviously I would use the same temp of water from the faucet thats in the tank and use dechlorinator.

I don't have an overstocked tank, but I do admit that more fish look more appealing and would like to be able to maintain one. I love american cichlids but they do get very big, and you usually can't keep a whole lot because they are messy fish and produce a lot of waste. Take a look at this tank on youtube, its the same size as mine (135g), and has a lot of cichlids. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ox4Hs6leako I'm sure the nitrate load would be pretty high for this amount of bigger sized fish even in this big of a tank, right? It looks good though as far as the health of the fish and has no plants to help with the nitrate load. So would my 2 hose idea work good? I don't want to put my fish in shock or anything, I mean it sounds like a good idea but i need another opinion. Thanx
I do not know if the tank in the video is using a sump in addition to the two (look to be aquaclear filters) on this tank or not,, but it is something I would consider were it me.
Were it my tank/fish, the Aquaclear filters would be 110 model rated I believe for 500 gal. per hour.
A sump in addition,, would in effect create more water volume allowing for large bioload along with providing more area for biological filtration and mechanical filtration ,(google Advantages of sumps in heavily stocked aquariums).
The problem I see with removing water while at the same time adding new water,, is part of the newly dechlorinated water would also be draining with the old.
Better in my view,to begin 50 percent water changes from the beginning in this tank, and after 50 percent has been removed with pump and hose? then close/shut off draining of tank and fill with fresh dechlorinated water with close to same temps and pH.
Maintaining filtration on such tanks is critical for as you have noted,these are large ,messy fish capable of producing loads of waste.50 percent water changes twice weekly I would think would be a good starting point,and regular cleaning or replacing of mechanical portion of filter would be needed depending on fish load and frequency and amount of foods offered.
Just my two cents.
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Old 05-23-2010, 06:55 AM   #12
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Oops, sorry, I should have been clearer. My comment about the 100% water changes and ammonia build up was aimed at keeping uncycled tanks. While it is certainly ok in some situations, the work involved to do frequent 100% changes on a larger tank would be extremely time consuming, and if maintenance slacked then the ammonia build up would be very fast.
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Old 05-23-2010, 12:53 PM   #13
 
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Oops, sorry, I should have been clearer. My comment about the 100% water changes and ammonia build up was aimed at keeping uncycled tanks. While it is certainly ok in some situations, the work involved to do frequent 100% changes on a larger tank would be extremely time consuming, and if maintenance slacked then the ammonia build up would be very fast.
Thanks Kim. I agree, and will be touching on this in my next post. B.
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Old 05-23-2010, 01:09 PM   #14
 
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I agree with 1077 on the maintenance issues with the tank in the video. Another point on that setup, we have no info as to the extent of his water changes; he may be doing several a week for all we know. My own personal view is that his tank is over-stocked; there is simply too much in the way of fish activity, it looks to me more like a store tank (I don't think it really is, just its appearance with so many fish). The fish appear healthy [though this is not always indicative of internal issues], so presumably the filtration/maintenance is handling the load. But a danger with this is what would occur very quickly should any trouble develop.

I also agree that removing and replacing water simultaneously is not recommended. As 1077 notes, you would be removing some of the fresh at the same time which rather defeats the purpose, since you want to remove as much of the old as possible. As I noted earlier on, you cannot change too much water, so the more that can be exchanged completely the better and more effective the change. However, this brings up the issue of water parameters; some will tell you not to change so much water at once because it will significantly adjust parameters (hardness and pH). This would be true if the initial difference between source water and tank water is significant, or if the aquarium is not biologically mature.

If maintenance is regular this should not be an issue. It is only when the aquarist allows the tank to go without proper maintenance (as required by the fish/water ratio) that the tank parameters will change so much that a water change can in that case be detrimental. With regular adequate maintenance, proper stocking levels, and good biological filtration (or plants), the tank will be stable. Adding fresh water that is somewhat different in parameters from the tank will not cause trouble in such a setup. The biological equilibrium in an aquarium, once established and solid, exerts a significant force during water changes. It is only when the tank is sitting on the edge, so to speak, in the first place that this can cause trouble.

As an example, my tap water has a pH of 7.0 or 7.2, and my 90g aquarium is kept at a pH below 6 (my only low range test kit says it is 5). I change half the tank water every week. The resulting pH change afterwards is in the region of .3 or .4 which is no different that the normal diurnal variation in all planted aquaria. In 15 years of doing this I have, as far as I know, had no fish issues due to this maintenance. And given the reaction of the fish to each water change (increased spawning behaviours, etc) I am confident they appreciate it.

Byron.
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