20 gallon! Help me choose! - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 21 Old 04-15-2012, 04:12 PM
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Gourami can be fun to breed. Males and females are commonly kept together, so you could try breeding honey gourami (they're remarkably similar to bettas). I've honestly never thought much of breeding a fish besides livebearers (because if you have them, they'll breed) or loaches (because there are so few accounts). Here is what seriouslyfish has to say about breeding those forktail rainbowfish : Forktail Rainbowfish (Pseudomugil furcatus) - Seriously Fish

---Izzy

Sitting by the koi pond

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post #12 of 21 Old 04-15-2012, 04:19 PM
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I vote for the loach but it says they are rare. Where would you get it from?

https://scontent-a-lga.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/1396036_10151774258717861_1754587068_n.jpg

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post #13 of 21 Old 04-15-2012, 04:20 PM Thread Starter
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Tiki, as much as I love them they are a no go, one person on aquabid sells them, for $60 each. :(
Koimaiden, I think I will try honey gourami breeding. The only fish (besides paradise fish) that my dad has a soft spot for are gourami, so maybe I'll get more bonus points towards another tank. ;)
Except, I'd have to divide it to spawn them, one side for parents one side for babies since I don't have a spawn tank, don't think they parents can stay inside :(

taking a break from fish-keeping.
3 lovely male betta still keep me company.

Last edited by Olympia; 04-15-2012 at 04:33 PM.
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post #14 of 21 Old 04-15-2012, 05:53 PM
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If you want to go the rainbowfish route, a school of ten or so Pseudomugil furcatus or forktail blue-eye would go well in a 20 gallon. They are an active fish, very personable, and truly spectacular when sparring and displaying.

There are lots of Pseudomugil species available, and they are great fish for tanks in the 15-20 gallon range.


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post #15 of 21 Old 04-15-2012, 06:10 PM Thread Starter
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Awesome. I've only seen threadfins at my LFS, they are ugly and grey looking, not bright orange like I see on google, would they colour up in a proper environment? They might be stressed out or something. I feel like I have enough room for a small group. They need a well planted tank to help with nitrates. How sensitive are Furcata exactly? :D

My final choices are:
Forktail blue eyes (species only)
Threadfin Rainbowfish (species only)
Common Hatchet fish (with one of the tetra)
X-ray tetra
Firehead/rummynose tetra
Honey gourami (with something, or alone if I decide to breed)

I asked about fiddler crabs on TFK, waiting for a response of some sort :D

taking a break from fish-keeping.
3 lovely male betta still keep me company.
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post #16 of 21 Old 04-15-2012, 10:16 PM
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Mine died because of an ammonia spike (oops) but my other Pseudomugil species (mellis) are pretty hardy. They survived the ammonia spike, an outbreak of internal parasites and multiple tank moves. Now I have them settled in an established, heavily planted tank and on a diet of pellets, live BBS and blackworms, they are spawning nearly every day.

I imagine furcatus would be pretty much the same. Rainbows tend to be pretty sensitive to water quality so I do regular small water changes on my mellis tank to keep everyone happy.

I think some threadfins may also have different colourations depending on where they were originally collected, I know it happens with a lot of rainbowfish. The only ones I have seen (even happy ones in established tanks) have only been silver-bodied like in these pictures

http://www.aquagreen.com.au/plant_da...a_werneri.html

Never that really strong orange-brown I have seen on some.

I intend on collecting as many Pseudomugil species as I can, if that says anything about how much I have enjoyed owning them.


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post #17 of 21 Old 04-15-2012, 10:27 PM Thread Starter
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Alright well I'll cross off the threadfins since I only like those really intense ones. I was reading about them, and the colour seems to be a mix of original location, and that apparently they never adapt well in aquaria and often turn silver in all but the best of environments. The New Guinea ones seem much more colourful than ones collected in Australia though.

The mellis are really soft water fish right? I don't want to be bothered to mess around with that yet, my water's no good for them.

I'm thinking either furcata, and my rabbit snail (want to breed them eventually), and maybe some sort of shrimp. Would a group of 10 be good for 20 gallons?

Or 6 firehead tetra, and either 6 hatchet fish, or 3 honey gourami with them. Plus shrimp/rabbit snails.

I want to do a soil based planted tank as well. :D

taking a break from fish-keeping.
3 lovely male betta still keep me company.
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post #18 of 21 Old 04-15-2012, 10:48 PM
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Yeah mellis and gertrudae are softer water while furcatus and tenellus generally like it at least neutral or harder.

Furcatus are pretty boisterous fish (think similar to danios) but a group of 7-10 should do well in a 20 gallon tank as they don't grow too big.

I feed mine .5mm spectrum pellets as their mouths are pretty small but they also took flake. They really enjoy a heavily planted tank, and if you want to breed, it is recommended that you check your spawning mop everyday as they will eat both eggs and fry.

I hatch my mellis eggs in a 2L milk bottle with an airstone and a drop of multi-cure (methelyne blue) to keep away fungus.


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post #19 of 21 Old 04-15-2012, 10:58 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleBettaFish View Post
Yeah mellis and gertrudae are softer water while furcatus and tenellus generally like it at least neutral or harder.

Furcatus are pretty boisterous fish (think similar to danios) but a group of 7-10 should do well in a 20 gallon tank as they don't grow too big.

I feed mine .5mm spectrum pellets as their mouths are pretty small but they also took flake. They really enjoy a heavily planted tank, and if you want to breed, it is recommended that you check your spawning mop everyday as they will eat both eggs and fry.

I hatch my mellis eggs in a 2L milk bottle with an airstone and a drop of multi-cure (methelyne blue) to keep away fungus.
Thanks for all the advice on these somewhat uncommon little guys.
It'll be a tough choice for me, I have quite some time while I set up the planted tank though. :D

taking a break from fish-keeping.
3 lovely male betta still keep me company.
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post #20 of 21 Old 04-15-2012, 11:00 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Norbert View Post
Hi everybody!
I'm having problems with lowering pH in my planted aqua.
I've tested my pH in tap water and it's 6.4 but in my tank it's 7.6 and for my fish it's too high, I'm looking for something around 7.0

I have 66 gallons
kH 10
GH 16

I've had this aqua running since January/February but my pH stays stable. Any adjustments to lower pH don't work at all (pH Down). When I used it next day result was the same.
2 weeks ago I've started to use Co2 (home made) but nothing happens.

I've bought recently proper pH 7.0 but I might give it back since it says "not for use in planted aquariums" - not sure why though, I wonder if it will kill my plants or something.

Anyway I don't want to use RO so only options I see it's peat or maybe rain water.
I'm not sure if rain water will help me since my tap water doesn't.
Do you think it'll change anything or I should go for peat?

Only issue I have with peat is that I will need to use it regurarly (when changing water) but I would preffer something more stable.

So since chemistry and tap water doesn't make any difference my question is will rain water change anything, same thing goes for peat?

I've read in book that turf is best way to change pH but I'm not sure how much it will change (too much means lots of dead fish) and I'm not so much convinced since I have high KH and GH.

Any suggestions?
I can't really help you, you should start your own thread.
All I know is that high KH makes changing pH very difficult, you should try and figure our how to lower KH and pH will follow. There might be something hardening water in your tank (shells/rocks).

taking a break from fish-keeping.
3 lovely male betta still keep me company.
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