What is difference between Canister Filter & Reactor? - Page 2
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What is difference between Canister Filter & Reactor?

This is a discussion on What is difference between Canister Filter & Reactor? within the Freshwater Aquarium Equipment forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Originally Posted by redchigh Abbeysdad: Nature has something that our tanks can't handle as easily: Anaerobic bacteria. Anaerobic bacteria do not consume oxygen, and ...

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What is difference between Canister Filter & Reactor?
Old 11-07-2012, 12:30 PM   #11
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by redchigh View Post
Abbeysdad: Nature has something that our tanks can't handle as easily: Anaerobic bacteria. Anaerobic bacteria do not consume oxygen, and live in "dead" areas of the substrate; They also convert nitrate and water into nitrogen gas (which bubbles out of the tank) and carbon dioxide.
RedcHigh - apparently you've missed my many, many posts regarding the very high nitrates I have in my well water. My DIY de-nitrate filter using Seachem Matrix and De*Nitrate to culture anaerobic bacteria was not successful. I've since setup an AC70 filled to capacity with the Matrix/De*Nitrate media, using an AC20 impeller for low flow. This material is effectually like live rock in SW.
I also now have extra floating plants AND deep [pool filter] sand in the tank.
I have toyed with an API Tap Water Filter to create DI water and have collected rain water. I use Fluval Lab Series Nitrate remover and/or API Nitra-Zorb now in a 29H aquarium in the basement to filter nitrates from my well water for weekly water changes. Even though I have treated the DI and rain water for minerals and pH, my fish simply do better with my filtered well water.

Truth be told, the limitation of our aquariums is that unlike the broad spectrum of life forms in nature, we're operating with a very limited subset. This limits similar bio-filtration capability. In this regard, I refer not only to anaerobic bacteria, but many other creatures. This is why we might resort to periodic chemical filtration to adsorb and remove impurities OR flush the system weekly with large(r) water changes.
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Old 11-07-2012, 02:00 PM   #12
pop
 
Hello abbeysdad

Take a look at safe denitrification section at the bottom of the webpage in the link is this what you are trying to accomplish with your diy project. I ran across this while reading about bacteria.

Heterotrophic Bacteria and Their Practical Application in a Freshwater Aquarium

pop
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Old 11-07-2012, 07:30 PM   #13
 
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Originally Posted by pop View Post
Hello abbeysdad

Take a look at safe denitrification section at the bottom of the webpage in the link is this what you are trying to accomplish with your diy project. I ran across this while reading about bacteria.

Heterotrophic Bacteria and Their Practical Application in a Freshwater Aquarium

pop
Thanks Pop - I followed the 'experiment' quite some time ago in the Seachem discussion forum. It was interesting to note that he had all but given up when suddenly nitrates magically lowered after adding a micron pre-filter.
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