Should I perform a 100% water change? - Page 4 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #31 of 40 Old 03-10-2014, 09:58 PM Thread Starter
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The black out has so far had no effect. Is there a way to speed up the crashing process? Most chemicals aren't safe for Crustacea, which is what I plan on adding next. Unless I wait another 2 weeks, by then either the chemicals would kick in or the thing would crash anyways. So can I speed this up? (I even covered the tank with a jacket, now)

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post #32 of 40 Old 03-10-2014, 11:40 PM
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for greenwater, as i have heard, and as i have experienced, ignore it, it gets really dark, then crashes itself
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post #33 of 40 Old 03-13-2014, 10:38 PM Thread Starter
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This is what the water looked like before I moved everybody. Notice how little you can see past the shell. This picture was taken with the lights on, but it is still the same as it was then without the lights.
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post #34 of 40 Old 03-14-2014, 12:16 AM
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Just my humble opinion but if this was my tank, I would do a 100% water change, or actually a series of 80% water changes. My goal would be to reduce nutrients in the water. Water changes will NOT harm your fish as long as there is nothing wrong with the replacement water. Dechlorinate and make sure temp is similar to the tank temp.

I could be totaly wrong about this being the best course of action, and there are others who know more than I, but I offer this advice with only the best of intentions and good will toward all. Just saying what I would do to my tank if I had this problem.
Good luck!

"Be the change you want to see in the world."

Last edited by rsskylight04; 03-14-2014 at 12:25 AM.
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post #35 of 40 Old 03-14-2014, 07:57 AM
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buy clams
freshwater sponges are too hard to get ahold of

they may not eat the greenwater into crystal clear water, but you could keep them alive (provided they were not past the point of no return when you got them from your lfs
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post #36 of 40 Old 03-14-2014, 08:08 AM
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i've never heard of anyone who has cleared a greenwater 'problem' (depending how you look at it) with water changes, ... the phytoplanton in the water is everywhere.

siphoning off 100% of the water is only possible without substrate at all in the tank, ... and even then 1 phytoplanton cell stuck to the side of anything, and the tank refilled before that little guy dries out, ... you're right back where you started.
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post #37 of 40 Old 06-22-2014, 02:41 PM Thread Starter
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O. M. G. Look. At. This!

About time!!!
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post #38 of 40 Old 06-23-2014, 09:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willertac View Post
About time!!!
So what cleared it up?

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/
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post #39 of 40 Old 06-23-2014, 03:26 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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So what cleared it up?
I did 2 blackouts, but they didn't work. I gave that up and just let the tank run like normal but without the lights or animals. Then it eventually all settled and died off.
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post #40 of 40 Old 06-23-2014, 06:09 PM
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I did 2 blackouts, but they didn't work. I gave that up and just let the tank run like normal but without the lights or animals. Then it eventually all settled and died off.
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thanks.

The no animals is why I also recommend suspending feeding with lights out also. It reduces the bioload especially the phosphates.


I think is is amazing how quickly and completely it clears up once it starts.


my .02

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/

Last edited by beaslbob; 06-23-2014 at 06:15 PM.
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