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Do you use a pad underneath tank

This is a discussion on Do you use a pad underneath tank within the Freshwater Aquarium Equipment forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> LOL sorry but if you have a large tank sitting on a stand that's let's say 10% off level...a foam will not help you ...

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Do you use a pad underneath tank
Old 01-19-2010, 02:39 PM   #11
 
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LOL sorry but if you have a large tank sitting on a stand that's let's say 10% off level...a foam will not help you there that's asking for disaster to happen.
As for "low spots" - I gotta say up front I don't own a single "tank stand" from a pet store, I use various nice oak cabinets or DIY stands and with the largest tank atm being the 55g this stand and the stand for the 45g is 100% level inside out, back to front. That's how my tanks been set up all these yrs now, only the first few tanks had the foam cause well as a newbie you tent to buy EVERYTHING the pet store sells with a fish on it
It works for me
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Old 01-19-2010, 08:00 PM   #12
 
We very occasionally get a minor tremble from earthquakes here in the Vancouver lower mainland area. I have often wondered if we had a slight tremble from one and that set off the potential leak in my last tank. I think the pad would help "soften" the trembling of the tank in a minor quake.
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Old 01-19-2010, 11:49 PM   #13
 
Yikes! I don't think a pad will help with the trembles. The pads usually pack down pretty thin, it's why they are good for filling in the low spots in the stand so that all of the tank sits firmly on something. This is my opinion only.
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Old 01-20-2010, 11:37 AM   #14
 
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Originally Posted by rsheets View Post
Yikes! I don't think a pad will help with the trembles. The pads usually pack down pretty thin, it's why they are good for filling in the low spots in the stand so that all of the tank sits firmly on something. This is my opinion only.
x2
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Old 01-21-2010, 11:30 PM   #15
 
I'm not thinking of buying the traditional pads sold at lfs's, instead I'm thinking of back packing pads which are much thicker. Obviously in larger shock waves from quakes nothing is going to help the tank, but we don't have many shakers here in the Vancouver Lower Mainland. Interestingly, I experienced more earth quakes living in Chicago, a city most don't equate with that phenomena.
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Old 01-22-2010, 08:33 AM   #16
 
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Interestingly, I experienced more earth quakes living in Chicago, a city most don't equate with that phenomena.
You sure that wasn't just the train going by?
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Old 01-22-2010, 08:56 AM   #17
 
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Dont' buy anything like this from a pet store, please. Go to you local home improvement store and look for insulating foam. The sell it in 4' x 8' sheets in various thicknesses. Its similar to the foam they make cheap coolers out of. You can get an entire sheet for $10 and it's big enough to supply your foam for several tanks.

Should you do it, yes. "I haven't had a problem yet," is a nice sentiment but I haven't caught tuberculosis yet, doesn't mean I'm gonna go walking into a TB ward and kissing every patient in there. First off, no surface is 100% level, especially when it comes to things like furniture. There will be small dips and rises across the surface. Remember, level just means it's parallel to the ground, not that it's perfectly smooth at all point. Additionally, wood is not a permanent rigid material. Over time it can deform, especially with a large load on it. Now I'm not saying if you don't use foam your tank's gonna leak. Your stand might be incredibly smooth and flat, your tank could just be strong, or it might just not be enough to be a problem.

Look at it this way though, the foam for your average sized tank costs about $2. Unless you can replace your tank, your stock, possibly some equipment, and repair water damaged flooring and stands for less than $2 that makes a layer of foam very cheap insurance.
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Old 01-22-2010, 08:01 PM   #18
 
And when your 75 gallon tank is on the second floor, I don't even want to think about leaks, using denial here....lol! As for trains in Chicago, that probably would have been true when I was living in Elmhurst, Ill just outside of Chicago proper, unbelievably long trains.
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