co2 in tank
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co2 in tank

This is a discussion on co2 in tank within the Freshwater Aquarium Equipment forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> This is just a question cause i was curious. Y in a high tec planted tank do they have solenoid controlling co2 being injected,Y ...

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Old 11-29-2006, 08:53 PM   #1
 
co2 in tank

This is just a question cause i was curious.
Y in a high tec planted tank do they have solenoid controlling co2 being injected,Y wouldent you hook your ph probe up to a solenoid on a couple airstones that way your fish would be suppliing the co2 but when it gets too high for the fish to breath your ph probe would kick on your solenoid that is conected to the airstones so you would have just the right balance of co2/air
If you did not quite understand that than what im saying is y have bottles of co2 lying around when you could have your fish make the co2 and you can regulate it with airstones?

solenoid-little motor used to control a valve on a co2 injection sytem
Ph probe-used to monitor the amount of co2 in tank and proberly turn on solenoid
co2-used for plant growth
Just a little reference for people that dont know what these things are :D
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Old 11-29-2006, 08:58 PM   #2
 
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I have yet to setup one and hasn't gone through it yet.

I can only answer that with fish making CO2, it may not be enough to accommodate all the plants especially in a heavily-planted one hence the CO2 systems. Regulating with airstones tend to make CO2 disperse quickly than being dissolved in the tank.

As I haven't used a CO2 system, I cannot answer the other questions.:)
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Old 11-29-2006, 09:11 PM   #3
 
ya blue i guess that sounds like a pretty good reason. maybe someone with a heavily stocked tank could do it(correct me if im wrong)
And another plant related question(blue please dont switch it to the plant section(nobody goes there)) I have noticed little air bubbles on my anarachis whats this?
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Old 11-29-2006, 09:19 PM   #4
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trreherd
ya blue i guess that sounds like a pretty good reason. maybe someone with a heavily stocked tank could do it(correct me if im wrong)
Andrew will answer all your questions if he goes online. He's the only member I know who uses high tech system for his tank.:)
Quote:
And another plant related question(blue please dont switch it to the plant section(nobody goes there)) I have noticed little air bubbles on my anarachis whats this?
Your plant is performing photosynthesis, trreherd.:)

P.S.I'll take this as an exception.
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Old 11-29-2006, 09:20 PM   #5
 
Fish do not supply enough co2 for a planted tank. Supplementing with a tank (or other co2 source) is required for succesful plant growth.

The bubbles you see on your anacharis are oxygen being produced by the plant.
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Old 12-01-2006, 10:58 PM   #6
 
what is co2? is planted meaning that there are live plants in the tank?
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Old 12-01-2006, 11:29 PM   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ^angel^
what is co2? is planted meaning that there are live plants in the tank?
CO2 is Carbon Dioxide. It dissolves in water an it's one of the things that plants need to efficiently photosynthesize. (The other two are light and certain trace chemicals.) While the lights are on, plants use CO2 and release Oxygen. When the lights go off, plants use oxygen.

A planted tank is a tank with lots of plants in it. A tank with a few plants in it is just a tank with some plants, but a planted tank is kind of a mini (or not so mini) underwater garden.
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Old 12-01-2006, 11:36 PM   #8
 
oh wow! Those are beautiful tanks! Thanks for sharing them with me! I especially love the one with the gold betta fish. =)
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Old 12-02-2006, 02:20 AM   #9
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RubberFrog
Fish do not supply enough co2 for a planted tank. Supplementing with a tank (or other co2 source) is required for successful plant growth.
I concur.
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Old 12-02-2006, 04:14 PM   #10
 
HUH????


Ok the reason is that bottled CO2 can supply high concentrations of CO2 and dissolve it quickly in the tank.
Fish respiration produces little CO2. As for oxygen countering, your right in part it does, but you dont really need airstones, you see oxygen is constantly in touch with water at the surface, the more surface area the water has the more it can absorb water, eg. if you have a filter outlet above the water level causing a splash you will be causing the water to absorb oxygen. i am trying to type this as basic as i can so that it makes sense- apologies if it doesnt.

PH is an effective way of measuring CO2 in water, as the more carbon you add the more acidic the water becomes. this is because by adding CO2 to water you are creating carbonic acid. If you have a GH of 3-4 then 6.8ph will be adequate supply for plant fert.
The softer the water the more prone it is to Ph crash from CO2 injection, the harder it is the less prone. Hardness is measured in KH carbonate hardness and GH general hardness.

Also it is Harder to mix CO2 with water than O2, this is why you need special reactors to mix the water and CO2 together, you cannot just let the co2 bubble out into the water. If you inject CO2 in your tank it is critical that you do not disturb the water surface, else you are displacing CO2 and just wasting your money, although should you inject too much CO2 then this is a great trick to employ.

I think thats the answer that you were looking for.

There are systems that employ sensors for injecting pressurised CO2 and O2 to keep are more constant PH, but the O2 used is only their to counter a rapid fall in ph during dark hours, the really big tanks also employ digital fert doses, and temperature control.

I dont know if anyone has seen amanos personal tank, but it has a filter and maintenance system the size of a medium sized family car lol :)

Any more questions post,i will try and answer them ;)

A.
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