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Best sort of lighting?

This is a discussion on Best sort of lighting? within the Freshwater Aquarium Equipment forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Originally Posted by willieturnip Try telling that to ANY reef keeper (including me).. sorry to bust your bubble here but we are talking about ...

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Best sort of lighting?
Old 12-07-2009, 09:18 PM   #11
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willieturnip View Post
Try telling that to ANY reef keeper (including me)..
sorry to bust your bubble here but we are talking about a freshwater trank which requirements differ greatly from what this topic about, please keep your off topic posts in the provided section ;)



To the OP, the lights you have pictured appear to be t5 lighting which is one of the top of the line lighting systems out there for freshwater. if i were you i wouldnt change the lighting but i would definately get a all in one comprehensive fertiliser. it has all 17 or so nutrients and all that good stuff that the plants need to grow.

planted tanks need the following to be sucessfull

Good lighting
balance of all micro and macro nutrients including c02
and a ph or around 7.5


i can tell you much much more about planted tanks lighting c02 ferts and all that good stuff but ill wait for you to ask cause the last thing i want to do is overrwhelm you and scare you off from doing a planted setup~

Last edited by MoneyMitch; 12-07-2009 at 09:22 PM..
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Old 12-08-2009, 05:47 AM   #12
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyMitch View Post
sorry to bust your bubble here but we are talking about a freshwater trank which requirements differ greatly from what this topic about, please keep your off topic posts in the provided section ;)



To the OP, the lights you have pictured appear to be t5 lighting which is one of the top of the line lighting systems out there for freshwater. if i were you i wouldnt change the lighting but i would definately get a all in one comprehensive fertiliser. it has all 17 or so nutrients and all that good stuff that the plants need to grow.

planted tanks need the following to be sucessfull

Good lighting
balance of all micro and macro nutrients including c02
and a ph or around 7.5


i can tell you much much more about planted tanks lighting c02 ferts and all that good stuff but ill wait for you to ask cause the last thing i want to do is overrwhelm you and scare you off from doing a planted setup~
Haha ok pal, thanks for info. yeah you are right, im just getting my head round cycling lol. So would it be best to do a planted setup during the cycling process? or can you add plants anytime? (when fish are in)

Thanks again

Dan
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Old 12-08-2009, 08:18 AM   #13
 
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I'd suggest to add the plants from the start (helps cycling) and there after you can add plants any time too.
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Old 12-08-2009, 06:13 PM   #14
 
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ok so the plants wont effect this fish if i drop em striaght in.?!?!
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Old 12-08-2009, 08:04 PM   #15
 
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Who!? I'm not sure I understand your question correctly.

Put plants in from the get go - No problem
Dumping bunch a fish and no plants from the get go - Big problem
Planting tanks and SLOWLY adding few fish - doable (if watching NO2, 3& Ammonia levels)
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Old 12-08-2009, 09:44 PM   #16
 
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Ok let me just give you a complete rundown of how to setup (Your) tank.

1. add gravel/sand/whatever your gonna use at least 2-3 inches deep
2. add water duh?!
3. fix all equipment where you want it, filters heaters etc etc
4. add dechlorinator
5. add as many plants as you like
6. add 1-6 fish
7. test water every other day or so for 1 month
8. once ammonia and nitrite stay at zero for AT LEAST a week then you are considerd to be "cycled"
9. add some more fish but no more than 5 at a time allowing a week to let the BB (beneficial bacteria) to stabilize to the new load

and presto there ya go and you can add plants all along the way in unlimiting quantity's, just remember plants need a good fert, nutrient and light balance in order to thrive.
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Old 12-09-2009, 12:54 AM   #17
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyMitch View Post
Ok let me just give you a complete rundown of how to setup (Your) tank.

1. add gravel/sand/whatever your gonna use at least 2-3 inches deep
2. add water duh?!
3. fix all equipment where you want it, filters heaters etc etc
4. add dechlorinator
5. add as many plants as you like
6. add 1-6 fish
7. test water every other day or so for 1 month
8. once ammonia and nitrite stay at zero for AT LEAST a week then you are considerd to be "cycled"
9. add some more fish but no more than 5 at a time allowing a week to let the BB (beneficial bacteria) to stabilize to the new load

and presto there ya go and you can add plants all along the way in unlimiting quantity's, just remember plants need a good fert, nutrient and light balance in order to thrive.

Agree with above for the most part.
Should you decide to add fish during the (cycling) process ,for 65 gal tank? Small ,hardy,active fish would be best choice. They create little bioload and the ammonia levels will be easier to manage.
Also important to feed the fish sparingly ,perhaps once every other day ,again, this will help keep toxins such as ammonia and or nitrites from becoming lethal between water changes that may be needed on daily basis depending on the numbers of fish,and the feeding.
As Mitch said,testing the water daily will be needed with fish in the tank and depending on results from your test kit,,the water may need changed to prevent ammonia from killing the fish, This is why feeding sparingly is recommended and also why fish should be SMALL in size and numbers.
Also ,once the tank has matureed or (cycled) I would add fish slowly. Can't agree with Mitch with suggestion of adding five at a time. Two or three depending on size,with week in between new additions.
Would not buy new fish from tanks where dead fish were present and once your tank is (cycled) I would set up small quarantine tank using some of the filter material from your cycled tank to (cycle) the small quarantine tank (Takes way less time than first tank) In this way, you would greatly reduce the risk of introducing disease to your newly cycled tank. Using filter material from your newly cycled tank would allow you to add the one or two new fish to the quarantine tank immediately. A small cheap filter and heater is all that is needed on the quarantine tank . I can think of little that is more stressful than patiently waiting for a tank to (cycle) or mature,only to have disease introduced with addition of possible sick fish yet many do so . It's your tank your call.
Lots of plants will also help during the (cycling process) as others have stated for they will use ammonia that would otherwise might harm fish but testing the water regularly in my view,would still be needed. If plants begin to decay ,then rather than removing ammonia,they will contribute to the problem. Hope some of this helps.
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Old 12-09-2009, 01:15 AM   #18
 
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After my tank cycled i added like 5-6 fish at once and all was well never even saw a ammonia increase nor nitrite
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Old 12-09-2009, 06:07 PM   #19
 
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I'd really say adding fish and how many at one time, clearly has to do with 2 things:
1) What kinda fish?
2) In relation to what size tank?

For example if y'all get 5 goldfish crammed into a 5g cycled tank - You bet ya you're gonna have a problem with the parameters.
Now if you were to take 5 Neon's to a 200g cycled tank - I bet ya it ain't gonna affect your parameters non.
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Old 12-13-2009, 11:22 PM   #20
 
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Lighting looks good to me, unless bulbs are really old. One full spectrum and one actinic (blue) is great. Your only drawback may be wattage. If those are t5 and not HO t5 then you have, what 48 watts total? I've read that .6 watt per gallon is really the min for plants. I try to aim for at least 1 watt per gallon (wpg) from my lighting equipment. I don't like to go up to 2 wpg because that grows algae. I have 108 watts on a 75 (HO T5) and 56 watts on a 55 (T5). Both are very new tanks, but zero green algae, and the plants do manage to grow.

Last edited by fish999; 12-13-2009 at 11:24 PM..
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