Newcomer. Surprise Fry! Help. - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

 
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post #1 of 7 Old 12-07-2010, 12:15 PM Thread Starter
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Newcomer. Surprise Fry! Help.

Last week I set up a well-planted 5 gallon tank with a soil and gravel substrate. Saturday I added 5 Corydorus habrosus. This morning while doing a water change I noticed I have several free swimming fry!

Here are my questions and concerns:

First my Aqua-Tech 5-15 filter seems way too powerful for the fry. I did put a piece of panty hose over the intake, but they still struggle with the current. Should I keep the filter running?

I cannot find a hang on breeder box. Could I float a small tupperware type container on the side of the tank and place the fry in it? I have one that is long and deep. I have some java moss I could place in with them.

Will the Corydorus habrosus eat the fry?

The water temperature is about 73 degrees. Is that good?

For now can I just feed them some regular flakes ground into a powder?

I also asked these questions in my original post about setting up a planted 5 gallon, so I apologize for repeating myself.

Any and all advice would be appreciated; I'd love to see a few of these little guys survive.
Thank you.
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post #2 of 7 Old 12-07-2010, 12:36 PM
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powdered flake and powdered corydoras food will probably be fine.

On another note, I wouldn't stress. You don't really have room for too many cories in a 5 gallon.... What will you do when you have 10 fry, and in two weeks they spawn again?
Sometimes it's best to let nature take it's course.

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^^ genius
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post #3 of 7 Old 12-07-2010, 12:57 PM Thread Starter
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I do have an empty 40 gallon breeder tank, but it isn't setup. I really don't want to disturb the corys as they seem to be doing well. I'd hate to stress them by moving them into one of my other tanks.

The little fry are fun to watch. I powdered some food and they swim to the surface to feed.
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post #4 of 7 Old 12-07-2010, 01:02 PM
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Yea, I wouldn't encourage moving the adults, but as long as you have a way to hold the fry. Go ahead and cycle that tank.

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post #5 of 7 Old 12-07-2010, 02:17 PM
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How large are the fry? Corydoras habrosus are pretty small, at least when I have acquired them they have always been no longer than 1/2 inch. The more plants and wood the better for the fry to remain hidden or to escape into. I have C. pygmaeus fry in my 10g hiding under the wood, and fry of various tetra frequently survive in the larger tanks as they can hide in the thick plants and find sufficient food--there is a lot of microscopic food in healthy tanks.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #6 of 7 Old 12-07-2010, 02:25 PM Thread Starter
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The fry are free swimming, but only about 1/4 of an inch long. My concern at the moment is that my filter seems to be too fast for them. The current is even strong for the adult Corydorus habrosus. I may see what my LFS suggests. Perhaps they will have a slower filter or one I could adjust the flow on.

I do have a small piece of bog wood soaking for another tank, perhaps I'll add it in for more hiding spots.
Thank you Byron for the suggestion.
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post #7 of 7 Old 12-07-2010, 03:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by combray View Post
The fry are free swimming, but only about 1/4 of an inch long. My concern at the moment is that my filter seems to be too fast for them. The current is even strong for the adult Corydorus habrosus. I may see what my LFS suggests. Perhaps they will have a slower filter or one I could adjust the flow on.

I do have a small piece of bog wood soaking for another tank, perhaps I'll add it in for more hiding spots.
Thank you Byron for the suggestion.
Previously I missed the filter issue, sorry. Yes, you don't want a lot of current. Without knowing what it is like in your setup I can't recommend replacement. But most fish are forest fish that come from quiet waters like slow-flowing streams and flooded forest, pools, etc. There are exceptions and they need more current. But C. habrosus is not one of them. Fish should not have to fight a current, it wears them out and can be stressful. If they can escape the current, that's different. And most fish when introduced to a new environment will often charge around, remain in water currents more, etc. as part of their adjustment. But in the final analysis, minimal water movement is probably better long-term.

In any sized tank up to a 50g I would usually suggest a sponge filter (size rated to the tank). A canister is better with larger tanks (50g and up).

Be careful with "advice" from stores. Many will sell you filters on the basis that tanks need all this filtration, which is just not true. The filter should be geared to the fish, and fish have different needs. As long as a tank is not overstocked, and particularly if there are live plants, filtration on the "less" rather than "more" is better.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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