Fishy Plans
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Advanced Freshwater Discussion » Fish Breeding » Fishy Plans

Fishy Plans

This is a discussion on Fishy Plans within the Fish Breeding forums, part of the Advanced Freshwater Discussion category; --> Well, since I used to breed reptiles, and had such a fun time doing it (and plan to get back into it sometime soon ...

Reply
Old 12-13-2010, 09:43 PM   #1
 
Kazzy's Avatar
 
Fishy Plans

Well, since I used to breed reptiles, and had such a fun time doing it (and plan to get back into it sometime soon once there is a lot more space), I'm wanting to try my hand at breeding fish. Wanted to show you what I had planned, and see what you guys and gals think. Feedback is always welcome!

Currently in my tank I have these fish I'm wanting to breed:
Rosy Red Minnows (I know mainly used as feeders, but I enjoy watching them swim around. They all have quite the personality)
Bettas (Well, maybe. I have a male and female, but I'll have to def set up some sort of breeder tank for them, which not sure if I want to)
Mystery Snails (Not I fish, but very interesting, and real beneficial since they help clean up and even produce fry food)

What I plan on adding to the list:
Platies (Various kinds)
Mollies (Mainly black and silver)
Ghost shrimp (Cute little buggers, and again, helpful with the clean-up)

My plan is to leave these in the main tank, and create an atmosphere for breeding. I'll be adding live plants so there will be plenty of areas to hide if any fry are born. I also plan on having a breeder net thing (can't ever remember exactly what it's called) to put any live bearer in if she looks close to popping.

For the fry/snail-lets (made that one up ) I'll have a ten gallon (maybe a little larger) set up. Bare bottom, and drift wood with plants on them, plus various other hiding places. I'll have a few foam filters, and will use the water from the main tank, and filter media from it as well. I'll probably put the foam filters in the main tank beforehand to establish the necessary bacteria. Of course a heater and light, and probably a bubble rock or two for airation. A few adult snails will stay in this tank to keep producing inforsia for the fry, as well as have some cultures set up with them and daphnia. Oh, and my tadpoles from my African Dwarf Frogs will probably stay in there as well. And of course the baby shrimp/gravid female shrimp.
I'll probably have two of these set up so as to keep from over crowding and separate the younger and older fry. As well as small plastic tubs for eggs before they hatch (with filtration as well).

Just wondering what everyone thinks. Also, instead of an aquarium for the fry tanks, could I possibly use clear plastic rubbermaid tubs? I can get bigger ones for cheaper than an actual aquarium. Oh, and I won't be keeping all of the fish, don't worry. There is a GREAT exotics store in my area that specializes in fish, so most of them I'll sell there or to other buyers.

Thanks for any and all feedback!
Kazzy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2010, 08:04 PM   #2
 
bettababy's Avatar
 
[quote=Kazzy;534132]Well, since I used to breed reptiles, and had such a fun time doing it (and plan to get back into it sometime soon once there is a lot more space), I'm wanting to try my hand at breeding fish. Wanted to show you what I had planned, and see what you guys and gals think. Feedback is always welcome!

I will do my best to break this down for you so I don't miss any questions, but it may take 2 posts to cover everything thoroughly, so please bear with me...

Currently in my tank I have these fish I'm wanting to breed:
Rosy Red Minnows (I know mainly used as feeders, but I enjoy watching them swim around. They all have quite the personality)
Bettas (Well, maybe. I have a male and female, but I'll have to def set up some sort of breeder tank for them, which not sure if I want to)
Mystery Snails (Not I fish, but very interesting, and real beneficial since they help clean up and even produce fry food)

I am assuming you understand you will need a number of different tanks to make this work? Betta fry will each need an individual container by the time they are a few weeks old to avoid them fighting and killing each other. This will require a good amount of space and daily water changes, which can be a lot of work. You will also need 2 separate tanks/containers for the adult bettas. Once the eggs are in the nest the female will need to be moved to her own tank/container. Most female bettas are intent on eating the eggs and the male will guard them furiously... killing the female if need be in order to save the fry. Once the fry are free swimming its a good idea to move the male out of the fry tank so he doesn't eat the fry.

Mystery snails lay eggs out of the water, so will require a tank with a water level that is lowered at least 2 inches from the top. The egg sac will need to stay moist/wet, so an air stone that splashes water at the surface is also needed, as well as a good cover to trap moisture and humidity and to keep the snails in the tank.

The rosy minnows are a little more complicated because they are an egg scatterer and it can be quite difficult to tell male from female, as well as needing a tank for the adults and a separate tank for the fry. Breeding the rosy minnows works best if you can start out with a group of 8 - 10 to ensure you have both sexes. You will want to prep the female minnows the same way you will with the bettas, black worms, mosquito larvae, brine shrimp work best for this. As the females fill with eggs it will help to better identify them from the male minnows, as they will have plump abdomens vs the slim males. In a separate tank move 1 male with a few females but watch them closely. As soon as the females are thin the adult fish must be moved out of the tank to avoid them eating the eggs. To prep the breeding tank a breeding mat or a thick layer of marbles should be used as the only substrate, this will help the eggs to fall through where they can't be reached as easily by the adult fish. If you plan to keep any mystery snails in this tank you should be aware that if they can reach them, mystery snails will eat the minnow eggs. When they hatch, rosy minnow fry are extremely tiny, so day 2 - 3 after the eggs are scattered you will need to watch just below the waterline at the surface for little sliver sized fry. (If you need examples of the breeding mat I suggest let me know and I can post a link for you)

What I plan on adding to the list:
Platies (Various kinds)
Mollies (Mainly black and silver)
Ghost shrimp (Cute little buggers, and again, helpful with the clean-up)

My plan is to leave these in the main tank, and create an atmosphere for breeding. I'll be adding live plants so there will be plenty of areas to hide if any fry are born. I also plan on having a breeder net thing (can't ever remember exactly what it's called) to put any live bearer in if she looks close to popping.

Breeder nets are mostly a waste of money, they cause undue stress for the fish and can cause other problems such as waste buildup in the net itself. If the tank is heavily planted with dense plants such as java moss, naja grass, etc. this is the better/easier way to save the fry... as well as limiting the number of adult fish in the tank. It would be a good idea to check with any lfs before you begin breeding livebearers, make sure the lfs will take the fry and find out how large they must be to be accepted. It is easy to get overrun with livebearer fry within just a few months. Each female is capable of producing 30+ fry every 30 days and fry can begin breeding amongst themselves by 6 - 7 wks of age, so you will want to separate fry male from female as soon as they are big enough for sexing, usually by 3 - 5 wks.

I would not suggest breeding ghost shrimp in the same tank as the fish if you wish to get fry. Ghost shrimp will need dense plants in the substrate to breed well. Java moss works well for this but should be at least 1 - 2 inches thick. Adult livebearers will eat newly hatched ghost shrimp if they can find them. Female ghost shrimp can be quite aggressive while berried, so giving them lots of space is a good idea. The more area in the tank the better your chances of more than 1 female able to successfully spawn simultaneously. If they are feeling crowded or don't find enough cover they will fight and stop spawning. 1 - 2 males is plenty for up to 8 females.
bettababy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2010, 08:13 PM   #3
 
Kazzy's Avatar
 
Thanks so much for the information!
I know I'll have to have several tanks, and have decided that I do not wish to put up with the demands of breeding bettas.

Also, when I was researching, I read the rosy red minnows don't scatter, they lay on the underside of flat rocks/wood/etc. and the male guards the eggs and fry. Were these websites wrong?

This is a kind of work in progress for me. I don't want to start now for sure, because I am not prepared. And I'm not done with my tank (adding plants soon-ish). Just wanted to make sure you knew I wasn't just a newbie wanting to jump in the breeding game.

Thanks again!!
Kazzy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2010, 08:51 PM   #4
 
bettababy's Avatar
 
For the fry/snail-lets (made that one up ) I'll have a ten gallon (maybe a little larger) set up.

You're going to want to work with something much larger than a 10 gallon for this, especially if you're only planning to run sponge filters. Water quality for fry, even snails, needs to be optimal for survival and proper development, this is especially true for shrimp fry. Shrimp are extremely sensitive to water quality/chemistry. There is also the issue of territory, and you will need plenty of that as well. Fish fry and shrimp fry tend to grow very fast.

Bare bottom, and drift wood with plants on them, plus various other hiding places. I'll have a few foam filters, and will use the water from the main tank, and filter media from it as well.

Water from the main tank should be tested before deciding to use it in the breeding or fry tanks. Its safer to start out using 1/2 water from the main tank and slowly add fresh, clean water to dilute any waste that is already present from the inhabitants of the main tank.

I'll probably put the foam filters in the main tank beforehand to establish the necessary bacteria. Of course a heater and light, and probably a bubble rock or two for airation.

This sounds good, however, rosy minnows do best in colder water temps, so should not be mixed with the tropicals.

A few adult snails will stay in this tank to keep producing inforsia for the fry, as well as have some cultures set up with them and daphnia. Oh, and my tadpoles from my African Dwarf Frogs will probably stay in there as well.

You may want to move the tadpoles to a habitat of their own so they don't eat fry as they begin to morph into frogs.

And of course the baby shrimp/gravid female shrimp.

Morphing tadpoles and adult dwarf frogs can and will likely eat shrimp fry if they can find and catch them. A gravid female shrimp may also attack the tadpoles, especially at feeding time.

I'll probably have two of these set up so as to keep from over crowding and separate the younger and older fry. As well as small plastic tubs for eggs before they hatch (with filtration as well).

To spawn all of the species you have listed here is going to take more than 2 tanks and a couple of plastic tubs.

Just wondering what everyone thinks. Also, instead of an aquarium for the fry tanks, could I possibly use clear plastic rubbermaid tubs?

Yes, you can do this, provided all of the needed elements are in place, such as filtration, shelter, proper temp, etc. Be careful with aquarium heaters in plastic tubs. If a suction cup lets loose the heater can come into contact with the plastic and it WILL melt.

I can get bigger ones for cheaper than an actual aquarium. Oh, and I won't be keeping all of the fish, don't worry. There is a GREAT exotics store in my area that specializes in fish, so most of them I'll sell there or to other buyers.

As mentioned previously, check ahead of time with these lfs's to be sure they will accept what you are spawning and to find out how big the fry must be before they will take them. Most lfs's will only accept bettas that are close to full grown, which can take 8 months - 1 yr. Livebearers must usually be at least 6 months old to be accepted... so expect to accommodate any/all fry for at least a 6 month or more period of time. This will require more space. Crowded conditions will not only cause issues with water quality but will also inhibit growth.

Thanks for any and all feedback!

Best of luck to you! If you need more help or more specifics for any of these species, please feel free to post all of your questions. In order for this to work for you, it will require you to be well prepared and plan in advance for each stage with each species.
bettababy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2010, 09:09 PM   #5
 
bettababy's Avatar
 
My mistake, you are correct about the rosy minnows. I need to slow down or stop posting when I am rushed. The rosy minnows are the one species you listed that I personally have not spawned yet, but there are other species of minnow that I have spawned... in my rush to finish my post before I was called away I recapped the requirements for the others I have spawned and waited until I had time and then looked it up. This is not normally how I function and I do apologize. I will take better care next time to avoid making this mistake again. Most schooling fishes are egg scatterers.. but I should know better than to make assumptions like that.

The rest of the info I offered you is, however, correct, and I speak that from yrs of personal experience with breeding each of those species.
bettababy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2010, 10:13 PM   #6
 
Kazzy's Avatar
 
Thanks again! No worries about the minnows, mistakes happen :)
Posted via Mobile Device
Kazzy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2010, 12:22 AM   #7
 
bettababy's Avatar
 
Thank you for understanding, there is a lot going on around here these days... everything is done a bit more rushed than usual lately.

Good idea to skip the bettas if you're planning to take on all the rest. Bettas can be time consuming not to mention the amount of space needed. Space limitations is one of the reasons I stopped breeding them, though I do still keep a couple of males around.

The only other caution I can think to mention is the amount of waste load you can get from mystery snails... so keep up on frequent partial water changes... and if you put live plants in their tank, especially bunch plants, expect to replace them frequently. Mystery snails love them and strip them down pretty fast.

Keep us posted, put up pics, etc. when you get started. Its always fun to watch what other people are doing.
bettababy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2010, 10:12 PM   #8
 
Kazzy's Avatar
 
There will be tons and tons of pics, don't worry!

I believe this specific type of 'mystery snail' is supposed to leave most plants alone. I'll have to make sure though.
Kazzy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
DIY sump plans blueblue48 DIY Aquarium 10 01-12-2010 02:47 AM
New set up plans Mean Harri Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 3 12-16-2009 02:57 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:08 PM.