Breeding Killifish
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Breeding Killifish

This is a discussion on Breeding Killifish within the Fish Breeding forums, part of the Advanced Freshwater Discussion category; --> I have recently become bored with breeding livebearers and wanted to try something new. I have scoured the internet with ideas of fish to ...

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Old 11-08-2009, 04:48 PM   #1
 
Breeding Killifish

I have recently become bored with breeding livebearers and wanted to try something new. I have scoured the internet with ideas of fish to try and breed, and having never bred an egg layer, thought about trying killies. Are they tough to breed? I realize that more work will need to go into breeding egg layers over livebearers. Anyone done this before?

Thanks!
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Old 11-08-2009, 06:49 PM   #2
 
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Well I can tell ya they're definitely on the more complex end of the egg layer folks there.
They really want IDEAL water situations and surroundings to breed and then they're also kinda picky partners I came to learn.
What type exactly where you looking into breeding?
What kinda water do you have (assuming you have ideal livebearers water, that's a lot of work just to turn this water into a perfect killi world)?
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Old 11-08-2009, 06:49 PM   #3
 
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What you got in your 55g? Maybe try breeding some cory would be another options?
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Old 11-09-2009, 09:52 AM   #4
 
Depending on the types of killies, different breeding method.

Go for easier one such as Aphysemion Species and they are cheaper and easily obtainable.

Yo do need lots of jars and turkey baster and spwaning mop/java mosss. Lot of work as you have collect eggs on daily basis and keep them separately dry Or keep transferring the pair to different jars every day. Drain out the water and let it go dry.
After certain time, add the water to container and you will see fry hatching.
Look for specific Killie and do research on that fish.
If this is too much, try Geophagus Steindacneri. One of first fish I bred (cant remember which one was first since it was long time ago).
Good Luck!
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Old 11-13-2009, 04:21 PM   #5
 
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I've found that Fundulopanchax garndneri is one of those Fish + Water = Fish ++ critters. Put a trio in a tak with floating plants (I use salvinia or water sprite), and a matt of java moss on the bottom. Feed them well with live or frozen food (Daphnia is great for this. Bloodworms and glassworms too.) Check the tank multiple times daily. Once you see the first babies (and they'll be dinky little glass slivers, a quarter the size of livebearer fry or less), take half the water and all the java moss to a separate tank. (You can replace the java moss in the breeding tank). Over the next week and a half, all the eggs in the moss in the hatching tank will hatch out into 30 to 50 or so fry. Feed them up on live or frozen baby brine shrimp. I generally add some frozen rotifers for the first two weeks too. Do this two or three times daily. Be ready to separate the males out to other tanks when they get near salable size, or at least to a tank with lots of stem plants for them to hide from each other in. (They're not bettas, but they will scrap a bit.)

I have had less success with Aphyosemion species. I suspect that's because they like a lower temperature than I was giving them. Nonetheless, most killie people will point you at them first.
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Old 11-13-2009, 08:57 PM   #6
 
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Originally Posted by tophat665 View Post
I've found that Fundulopanchax garndneri is one of those Fish + Water = Fish ++ critters. Put a trio in a tak with floating plants (I use salvinia or water sprite), and a matt of java moss on the bottom. Feed them well with live or frozen food (Daphnia is great for this. Bloodworms and glassworms too.) Check the tank multiple times daily. Once you see the first babies (and they'll be dinky little glass slivers, a quarter the size of livebearer fry or less), take half the water and all the java moss to a separate tank. (You can replace the java moss in the breeding tank). Over the next week and a half, all the eggs in the moss in the hatching tank will hatch out into 30 to 50 or so fry. Feed them up on live or frozen baby brine shrimp. I generally add some frozen rotifers for the first two weeks too. Do this two or three times daily. Be ready to separate the males out to other tanks when they get near salable size, or at least to a tank with lots of stem plants for them to hide from each other in. (They're not bettas, but they will scrap a bit.)

I have had less success with Aphyosemion species. I suspect that's because they like a lower temperature than I was giving them. Nonetheless, most killie people will point you at them first.
How easily are these Fundo. species avail locally?
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Old 11-13-2009, 10:20 PM   #7
 
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How easily are these Fundo. species avail locally?
None of the killiefish are easily available at retail stores. I've only seen one carry anything other than Apolicheilus (sp? - Golden Wonder) killies. That said, there has to be an aquarium society or two in NYC, possibly even in queens, and likely meeting somewhere near a subway stop. Fp. gardneri is one of the more commonly traded ones, as are some of the aphyosemions and epiplatys and some of the other fundulopanchaxes. If you don't have the wherewithal or desire to culture your own live food, I'd be very certain that you got a species that will thrive on prepared food (such as Fp. gardneri), as more than a few killies do poorly on anything that's not live.

Many killies, Fundulopanchax spp. included, will, under the right conditions, lay their eggs in a peat substrate, which can then be removed and kep just moist for quite some time, and the eggs will remain viable and hatch when put in soft water. So your other option is to purchase eggs by mail. They can be sent US post without much risk of them dying, so shipping is not exhorbitant like it tends to be with live fish. I believe that there is a section of aquabid.com for nothing but killie eggs. You should check it out. (Incidentally, if you have the space for them, the Blue Gularis is a great fish too.)

Regardless, if you are at all interested in breeding fish, I cannot recommend highy enough that you find a local aquarium society to join up with. Aquarists are a really odd assortment of folks, and can be a great deal of fun as well as an invaluable resource.
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Old 11-13-2009, 10:24 PM   #8
 
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I have nothing to add to this thread other than "Nice to see you back, Tophat665".
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Old 11-13-2009, 10:46 PM   #9
 
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I have nothing to add to this thread other than "Nice to see you back, Tophat665".

My cockles are positively toasty just now.
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Old 11-14-2009, 06:17 AM   #10
 
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+ 1 tophat665
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