Input on DIY facade/cabinet doors for stand
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Input on DIY facade/cabinet doors for stand

This is a discussion on Input on DIY facade/cabinet doors for stand within the DIY Aquarium forums, part of the TFK Resources category; --> So I started the stand for my new 240 gallon last night. Putting the floor, back wall, and the top on tomorrow morning when ...

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Input on DIY facade/cabinet doors for stand
Old 02-19-2014, 11:33 PM   #1
 
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Input on DIY facade/cabinet doors for stand

So I started the stand for my new 240 gallon last night. Putting the floor, back wall, and the top on tomorrow morning when I get off of work. What I need help with is the outside of the stand (and canopy when I get there). What type of wood (I'm assuming some sort of hardwood plywood?) would y'all suggest for it? Trim? Stain color? Pre-stain or not? Hinged cabinets or the type you slide into place? Thanks in advance for the input!
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Old 02-20-2014, 01:17 AM   #2
 
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If that frame is built out of 4x4's it will be a flip of the coin as to what weighs more, the stand or the empty tank. If you get tired of aquatics you could always sell the frame to the Army Corp of Engineers, you could shore up a bridge with that! I've seen people use a piece of 4x4 as a makeshift jackstand, in theory that frame could hold 2 1/2 full size pickup trucks. You need a bigger tank for that impressive overbuild.

While most of my building is for fishroom racks, anything from little 5's & 10's to a 3'x10' platform that holds 260 gallons of tanks I did have to do a show stand just to make sure I could. BTW that platform has six 4x4 legs, 2x6 perimeter frame with 2x4 stringers every 18", sits almost 4' up above a couple 150 gallon tubs. I did a stand for a 65 years ago, 2x4 frame, skinned with finished 1 side plywood;



You can do a lot with stock millwork for the trim, it hides things for folks like me who do carpentry out of necessity not as a trade. Pretty sure that's a medium oak stain with a couple coats of satin poly, doors depend on if you have room in the front for swing, or more room to the side to slide. As far as the top, after 10 years the humidity is taking its toll on the plywood, it's starting to delaminate. The wood is the easy part, matching the stain is going to take some messing around. I'd go with hardwood plank, but then weight becomes an issue, with a 2x2 frame it already weighs about 60 pounds;



Quick WIP pic of the rack I mentioned previously, back legs are lag bolted to the floor joists above;



Looking at the framework for that stand I'm not going to worry about the floor you're putting it on, if it isn't concrete you've probably shored it up with half a dozen 8x8 posts!

Last edited by Tolak; 02-20-2014 at 01:20 AM..
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Old 02-20-2014, 01:38 AM   #3
 
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Haha, yes, it's overbuilt. I don't want water all in my new house because I didn't build the stand strong enough. As for the floor support, I had my builder put it a metal post underneath the floor that runs the length of the living room. You know, just in case I decide to try a DIY 1K gallon or something. :P How tough is it to build cabinet doors? I've never really done much "decorative" woodwork.

EDIT: also, the tank (empty) is around 500 lbs, the stand is roughly 200 if i were guessing.

Last edited by Turxiat; 02-20-2014 at 01:39 AM.. Reason: Additon
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Old 02-25-2014, 01:23 PM   #4
 
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Excellent stand. I believe in overbuild every time, mind you you have exceeded my overbuild

Built a number of cabinets over the years in a number of sheet materials and (given the looks of your stand) you will find it straightforward as you are working to a regular shape. Used everything from contiboard through MDF and ply to real wood sheets and never had a problem. If you think the material you use for the hood could absorb water then just gave it a couple of coats of polyurethane varnish on the inside (make sure it hasn't got any additives in) and you can always run a bead of silicone over any exposed joints. Personally I would say you are better with hinged doors than sliding as your frame will 'settle' as the tank is filled and there will be some 'movement' due to the nature of wood.
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Old 03-11-2014, 03:51 AM   #5
 
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Sorry it's been awhile, work got the better of me. Here are some updated pics. I ended up going with a "free float" style of removable doors. The trim actually holds all but 3 of the wooden panels in place so that they can all be removed for virtually unlimited access to the interior of the stand. The hood doesn't have anything covering the back side yet, working out some details in my head on how to set it up to open from the back. I did poly the inside of the hood for water resistance. Next update should be Thursdayish with the plumbing set up for the sump tank and 1/3 of the water in the main tank.
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Old 03-11-2014, 04:53 AM   #6
 
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Looks nice, and fits that space well! I like the idea of removable panels, great idea.
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Old 03-12-2014, 02:07 PM   #7
 
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Looking very good. Very nice background, is that expanding foam? What have you covered it with! Excellent.
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Old 03-12-2014, 02:31 PM   #8
 
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Thanks Tolak! Biffer, that is "Great Stuff" spray foam covered with several layers of quikrete. I also carved 2 roman style pillars out of arts and craft styrofoam. The wall is colored using the quikrete color additives (this fine powder you add to the quikrete mix). I'm having an issue now (about a week after putting the quikrete in) with the quiklrete cracking in areas where the layers were thinner. I'm going to attempt and put another layer in those areas tonight.
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Old 03-14-2014, 09:44 PM   #9
 
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Got it all plumbed and hooked up to the sump/return pump. Filled 8 inches of the tank after getting my mineralized topsoil capped with black tahitian sand. Gonna leave it like this until I get my plants in Thursday then I'll fill it 16 inches and let the weight settle for a day or two before I fill it all the way. Can't wait to have this sucker finished!
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