30G Sump - Input Welcome
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30G Sump - Input Welcome

This is a discussion on 30G Sump - Input Welcome within the DIY Aquarium forums, part of the TFK Resources category; --> So my Cichlids said they want a sump and I believe them! Here are my plans for my new setup. Please offer any suggestions ...

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30G Sump - Input Welcome
Old 06-19-2008, 09:09 PM   #1
 
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30G Sump - Input Welcome

So my Cichlids said they want a sump and I believe them! Here are my plans for my new setup. Please offer any suggestions you may have before I start. I will be posting pictures as time goes on....


Current Setup:

72G Bowfront Tank
1 - Eheim 2213 Canister
1- Eheim 2224 Canister
1- Hagen Aquaclear 700
1- Small In-Tank Refugium
1- PhosBan 150 Reactor Connected To In-Tank Mini-Jet
2- 250 Stealth Heaters
1- UV Sterilizer

Goals:
1- Drastically reduce the appearance of "life support" equipment in tank.
2- Provide better filtration.
3- Reduce Nitrates.
4- Have a fun project to work on.

-PLAN-



1- Water Inlet From Overflow
2- Some Sort Of Dispersion Plate
3- New Bio Balls (Aprox. 5G) & Other Bio Media From Eheim 2224 & 2213
4- Plants Over Sand & Laterite, Also Some Nice Rocks For Algae To Grow On
5- Hagen Aquaclear (Running Mostly Mechanical Filtration Media)
6- Phosban Reactor (Running Chemical Filtration)
7- Eheim 2213 Inlet/Outlet (Mostly Mechanical Water Polishing)
8- Sponge (Mechanical Filtration)
9- 250W Stealth Heater
10-Pump Platform (To Decrease Head Space)


Thanks Guys! Let me know what you think!

:P
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Old 06-19-2008, 11:29 PM   #2
 
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Also, I forgot to add. #4 Has a blue strip in the picture. That is for a possible bubble strip... I don't know if that will do any good for the plants but i imagine so... Also the wall to the right of #8 should not go up above the water line (that would not be so effective now would it?).
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Old 06-19-2008, 11:51 PM   #3
 
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Ok.

Below are pictures of the Bowfront and the empty 30G to be made into the sump... Just so you can get the vision...





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Old 06-27-2008, 01:03 PM   #4
 
Your system will work ok as is, all I have are suggestions for small improvements .

1) Attach spray bar.
2) Plastic peg board is available from Lowes/HD (saves on drilling holes). Place pre-filter on top of this (always pre-filter water before bio-material, prevents clogging the biological material and killing the bacteria).
3) Lower water level so as to have a wet/dry atmosphere for other biologicals. Place wood airstone (finer bubbles = better gas exchange) under the bio-materials for added aeration and increased bacterial growth.
4) Use plants that absorb nutrients from the water column (rather than soil) and use plastic canvas (curve to make cave-like formations), (rough up with some sandpaper for even more surface area), (available @ craft stores or WallyWorld) as a base for plant roots and other biologicals.
5) OK, but separate inlet/outlet as much as possible.
6) Do you have water quality problems that this is necessary.
7) Use this as your return pump for a 1.3x turnover (you didn't state desired turnover rate or Bio-load).
8) Make 'sponge' accessible for cleaning (or it won't get done on a regular schedule
9) Move heater to #8's compartment for more contact time.
10) lower pump platform so pump doesn't run dry as easily (right above the sponge is good (#8)
11) Instead of vent holes either raise the dividers or cut non-clogging slots.
12) Lower all dividers so as to create an over-flow remediation condition.

Otherwise I wouldn't change a thing... [/i]
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Old 06-27-2008, 08:27 PM   #5
 
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I agree with Dr Joe, that second divider on the left is so high that if things stopped and the tank had to dran whats in the overflow/pipe youd get a nasty spill on your hands. youll have to decide wether or not you could handle a nasty spill, or if you want the hagen aquaclear because with a lower divider that wouldnt fit on (i think you can submerse the phosban reactors?)
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Old 06-27-2008, 11:56 PM   #6
 
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OK, I see a few problems with your design.

1. You need to lower the pump and enlarge the Return Chamber (the section with the pump). A sump system is a great asset to any system. One of the greatest benefits is that the water level in the display aquarium never drops due to evaporation. Instead, the evap will show in the return chamber. The return chamber needs to house enough water to cover the pump at all times, plus enough water to cover evap for at least 24 hours. Keep in mind that your evaporation rate will increase with the use of a sump. Basically, I would recommend that your return section house at least 4 gallons of water.

2. Make sure you have enough extra room in the sump to cover power outages. In the event of a power outage, water from the display will drain out to the lowest point allowable by the overflow. The sump will need to house the afforementioned contents on the tank, plus the contents of any plumbing between the two, and possibly any other equipment that might drain out in the event of a power outage. I'd recommend your baffles be no higher than 5"-6" below the top of the tank

3. You may have a problem running a HOB filter in the sump while allowing the necessary room for the requirements listed in #2 of these recommendations. I would seek to incorperate the filtration in the design of the sump rather than adding the HOB filter.

4. Since a sump is gravity fed, It needs to be housed at a level below the tank. The most common location is in the stand below the tank. Since Canister filters also need to be housed below the tank in which they are installed, you may see an issue with installing the Eheim in the sump. Again, I would seek to incorperate the filtration in the design of the sump rather than adding the canister filter.

5. There are things that you will need to consider for the proper installation of the plumbing. We can discuss this later after a design has been established that is both properly functional, and suitable to your specific needs.

These are just a few of the issues i see. I would highly recommend that you review the questions and responses posted in the "Sumps and Refugiums" section of "Starting and Maintaining a Saltwater Aquarium". This will help you to gain a better understanding of the functional needs and design standards involved in the use and design of a sump. I would also invite you to take a look at the sump I designed and constructed for use in my reef. This 30g long design has been in operation on a 55 gallon reef since november of 2007 without failure. I would be more than happy to provide you with additional assistance in the design and construction of your sump should you so desire.

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Old 08-28-2008, 11:40 AM   #7
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SKAustin
OK, I see a few problems with your design.

1. You need to lower the pump and enlarge the Return Chamber (the section with the pump). A sump system is a great asset to any system. One of the greatest benefits is that the water level in the display aquarium never drops due to evaporation. Instead, the evap will show in the return chamber. The return chamber needs to house enough water to cover the pump at all times, plus enough water to cover evap for at least 24 hours. Keep in mind that your evaporation rate will increase with the use of a sump. Basically, I would recommend that your return section house at least 4 gallons of water.

2. Make sure you have enough extra room in the sump to cover power outages. In the event of a power outage, water from the display will drain out to the lowest point allowable by the overflow. The sump will need to house the afforementioned contents on the tank, plus the contents of any plumbing between the two, and possibly any other equipment that might drain out in the event of a power outage. I'd recommend your baffles be no higher than 5"-6" below the top of the tank

3. You may have a problem running a HOB filter in the sump while allowing the necessary room for the requirements listed in #2 of these recommendations. I would seek to incorperate the filtration in the design of the sump rather than adding the HOB filter.

4. Since a sump is gravity fed, It needs to be housed at a level below the tank. The most common location is in the stand below the tank. Since Canister filters also need to be housed below the tank in which they are installed, you may see an issue with installing the Eheim in the sump. Again, I would seek to incorperate the filtration in the design of the sump rather than adding the canister filter.

5. There are things that you will need to consider for the proper installation of the plumbing. We can discuss this later after a design has been established that is both properly functional, and suitable to your specific needs.

These are just a few of the issues i see. I would highly recommend that you review the questions and responses posted in the "Sumps and Refugiums" section of "Starting and Maintaining a Saltwater Aquarium". This will help you to gain a better understanding of the functional needs and design standards involved in the use and design of a sump. I would also invite you to take a look at the sump I designed and constructed for use in my reef. This 30g long design has been in operation on a 55 gallon reef since november of 2007 without failure. I would be more than happy to provide you with additional assistance in the design and construction of your sump should you so desire.

sir, what is that white thing on the floor? and where do we get that? that's what i needed.. i just don't know what's the name of that.. thanks..
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Old 08-28-2008, 05:14 PM   #8
 
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I believe it's called egg crate and when I asked about it this is what I was told:


Egg crate is a plastic material that has small squares in it. It is normally used for flourescent light fixtures as a cover that lets more of the light through than normally plastic covers.

http://www.acehardware.com/largeImag...-4565983dt.jpg
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Old 08-29-2008, 12:30 AM   #9
 
thank you very very much.. i really appreciated it..
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Old 09-05-2008, 02:34 AM   #10
 
I am assuming that this is going to go somewhere hidden away. if so you will need a powerful light for the plant life in there. I am not sure you need all that extra equiptment in there such as the power filters and the reactor, most of that can be achieved under the power of the water return pump, so its a waste of money. also I strongly suggest putting all of the mechanical filtration first before the bioballs, and if you want water polishers you can put them right before the pump. lastly I would like to see a bit more surface agitation in some form weather it be air stones or waterfalls.
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