Normal behavior for loach?? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 04-10-2011, 10:24 AM Thread Starter
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Normal behavior for loach??


I introduced 4 small Angelicus loaches into a 23 gal tank yesterday. They will eventually be moved to a larger tank. I notice 2 of them go up and down the side of the tank. Is this normal? Will they settle eventually?

Gwen

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post #2 of 6 Old 04-11-2011, 08:08 PM
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That is very common when they are first introduced to a new environment. It means they are stressed, very stressed, but there is nothing you can do about that, it is their nature. Don't try to do anything, let them do what they want and they will settle down. Sometimes it only takes a day or two, sometimes a week or longer.

I have a group of five of these, Botia kubotai is the scientific name, this species is in our profiles (click the shaded name to see it). When I first got them, they settled into the 70g quite quickly, about 2 days or so. I recently moved them to a new tank, my 90g, that I aquascaped like an Indian river, their natural habitat. For more than a week, all five of them spent the entire day non-stop swimming fairly fast in a clockwise 8-inch circle against the rear wall of the tank under the filter spraybar. After about 8-9 days, one of them pulled away from the group and started searching around under the various bits of wood. They like lots of wood or rock creating caves, overhangs, etc., as they like to select their own for a home. A couple days later, 2 more did the same, and then the others. Now they are back to normal.

This is a lovely species, very peaceful, very social with each other, playful, and at 5 inches still small enough for 4-foot tanks unlike many of their relatives. I had them in a 33g for a time, temporarily, but they clearly were not happy. Periodically two of them will "play" by circling very fast head-to-tail, first clockwise, then counterclockwise. Loaches are highly social fish. I've had these nearly 2 years, they are 3-3.5 inches now.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #3 of 6 Old 04-11-2011, 08:22 PM Thread Starter
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That is very common when they are first introduced to a new environment. It means they are stressed, very stressed, but there is nothing you can do about that, it is their nature. Don't try to do anything, let them do what they want and they will settle down. Sometimes it only takes a day or two, sometimes a week or longer.

I have a group of five of these, Botia kubotai is the scientific name, this species is in our profiles (click the shaded name to see it). When I first got them, they settled into the 70g quite quickly, about 2 days or so. I recently moved them to a new tank, my 90g, that I aquascaped like an Indian river, their natural habitat. For more than a week, all five of them spent the entire day non-stop swimming fairly fast in a clockwise 8-inch circle against the rear wall of the tank under the filter spraybar. After about 8-9 days, one of them pulled away from the group and started searching around under the various bits of wood. They like lots of wood or rock creating caves, overhangs, etc., as they like to select their own for a home. A couple days later, 2 more did the same, and then the others. Now they are back to normal.

This is a lovely species, very peaceful, very social with each other, playful, and at 5 inches still small enough for 4-foot tanks unlike many of their relatives. I had them in a 33g for a time, temporarily, but they clearly were not happy. Periodically two of them will "play" by circling very fast head-to-tail, first clockwise, then counterclockwise. Loaches are highly social fish. I've had these nearly 2 years, they are 3-3.5 inches now.

Byron.
Thanks - I think they'll like the tank I'm going to move them to - sand bottom and I do have numerous hiding places, even in the current tank they have lots of plants and hiding places. They are small now. I hope they are not wild caught, but are bred in captivity - I really don't like to get fish that have been taken out of their natural environment. Do you know much about if most are wild or captive bred?? You'd think if they have been bred in captivity, they wouldn't be so nervous.

Gwen

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post #4 of 6 Old 04-11-2011, 08:42 PM
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Originally Posted by GwenInNM View Post
Thanks - I think they'll like the tank I'm going to move them to - sand bottom and I do have numerous hiding places, even in the current tank they have lots of plants and hiding places. They are small now. I hope they are not wild caught, but are bred in captivity - I really don't like to get fish that have been taken out of their natural environment. Do you know much about if most are wild or captive bred?? You'd think if they have been bred in captivity, they wouldn't be so nervous.

Gwen
As it states in our profile under water parameters, these will be wild caught. Unless someone near you is in to breeding them. But I don't know if anyone has been successful with this species yet.

Wild-caught fish are not usually a problem for the species, provided their collection is responsible. Many countries have laws restricting collection times to ensure preservation of the species, and it can be a very important economic mainstay for the native peoples to collect fish while practicing preservation. Countries in South America are leading the way in this, and with good results. That is why we often see certain species only once a year. There is much greater loss of habitat due to industrialization causing fish reduction and even extinction, than due to the hobby.

Almost all my fish are wild-caught. They are more colourful, healthier, stronger, more resistant to disease... I will always select wild-caught over tank raised if I can.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #5 of 6 Old 04-11-2011, 09:05 PM Thread Starter
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As it states in our profile under water parameters, these will be wild caught. Unless someone near you is in to breeding them. But I don't know if anyone has been successful with this species yet.

Wild-caught fish are not usually a problem for the species, provided their collection is responsible. Many countries have laws restricting collection times to ensure preservation of the species, and it can be a very important economic mainstay for the native peoples to collect fish while practicing preservation. Countries in South America are leading the way in this, and with good results. That is why we often see certain species only once a year. There is much greater loss of habitat due to industrialization causing fish reduction and even extinction, than due to the hobby.

Almost all my fish are wild-caught. They are more colourful, healthier, stronger, more resistant to disease... I will always select wild-caught over tank raised if I can.

Byron.
Good to hear your perspective on that. If it's done responsibly and the species are not hurt because of it, it just seems like a drag for fish to go through all they do, taken from a nice natural world, to possibly end up dead in a "forgotten" tank with killer ammonia levels etc, that you hear so much about. Kind of sad. I just put in a piece of sweet potato for mine, and they are already going for it. Cute little fish. I'd like to have put them in the bigger tank right away, but I'm fearful of ich. How long would you recommend I keep them from my other fish?

Gwen

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post #6 of 6 Old 04-12-2011, 10:51 AM
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Good to hear your perspective on that. If it's done responsibly and the species are not hurt because of it, it just seems like a drag for fish to go through all they do, taken from a nice natural world, to possibly end up dead in a "forgotten" tank with killer ammonia levels etc, that you hear so much about. Kind of sad. I just put in a piece of sweet potato for mine, and they are already going for it. Cute little fish. I'd like to have put them in the bigger tank right away, but I'm fearful of ich. How long would you recommend I keep them from my other fish?

Gwen
If this is quarantine, many suggest 4 weeks. If ich is present, you will see the fish "flashing" which means scraping their gill region on something, like a plant leaf, wood, rock or even the substrate. I just monitor this when I see it. Ich first attacks the gills so we can't see the white spots. Most fish, if they are healthy, will fight it off and you will never see it further. This is preferable to treatment since any medication is going to stress out any fish, and loaches being scaleless are even more sensitive to chemicals. Keep the water in the QT very clean, regular 50% changes (weekly but more often if you suspect something); with otherwise-healthy fish this is often the only treatment needed for ich and several other things. When it comes time to move them into the display tank, provided the temp is the same and pH/hardness are close, just net them over. It is quicker and less stressful.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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