Adding new danios to help current danios, even if the new ones probably won't last? - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 15 Old 05-11-2011, 09:52 PM Thread Starter
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Stem plants are plants like Brazilian Pennywort, Wisteria, Cabomba, Bacopa, and many others. They are under the "Stem Plants" section in the profiles. These plants simply grow a continuous stem from which roots and leaves emerge. You can break them at any point and create new plants with bits of the stem. They can be planted in the substrate (gravel) or allowed to float sometimes. What we call substrate-rooted plants are those like the ones you have, that have a crown from which leaves arise upward and roots downward, to put it simply. Sword plants are good substrate-rooted plants, you should consider some of those in time.

I went out today to look for some stem plants. My nearest Petsmart had none, so then I went to a Petco and they told me Petsmart had a better selection for specific plants as most of the Petco plants are just marked as "assorted." I went ahead and picked out some assorted ones that looked like they might be stem plants. Could you look at the picture and tell me if you think they are? If so, I will go ahead and get more of them to replace the rest of my Gold Ribbons, and if not, I will go check out the selection at other Petsmarts.
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post #12 of 15 Old 05-12-2011, 09:34 AM
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Yes, those along the front are a stem plant, though I'm not exactloy sure which one. It bears a very close resemblance to Nesaea crassicaulis, but may more likely (considering the store source) be Bacopa caroliniana. Anyway, planting it apart like that is good at this stage, as the light will be better for the lower leaves, not that there are many. But they should recover.

You're in Philadelphia, are there no fish stores other than the chains in that city?

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #13 of 15 Old 05-12-2011, 08:17 PM Thread Starter
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You're in Philadelphia, are there no fish stores other than the chains in that city?
There are I'm sure, I just don't really know of them! The other pet store I know around here is called Monster Pets, which is pricier but has lots of exotic fish (barracudas, piranhas, electric eels, pufferfish, wolf fish, and my favorite red-tailed catfish, of which I hope they warn people about their adult size!). Unfortunately they do not have any live plants.


I'm glad that the plants I got are indeed stem plants. And I think you said that with stem plants you can just cut off part of it and that part will grow on its own? Already you can see that one of them is too tall, so I would like to cut that one down. I tried to look online of what the plants might be, my only guess was moneywort for the tall ones and some kind of anubias for the ones with big heart-shaped leaves, but your guess is better than mine.
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post #14 of 15 Old 05-13-2011, 08:38 AM
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There are I'm sure, I just don't really know of them! The other pet store I know around here is called Monster Pets, which is pricier but has lots of exotic fish (barracudas, piranhas, electric eels, pufferfish, wolf fish, and my favorite red-tailed catfish, of which I hope they warn people about their adult size!). Unfortunately they do not have any live plants.


I'm glad that the plants I got are indeed stem plants. And I think you said that with stem plants you can just cut off part of it and that part will grow on its own? Already you can see that one of them is too tall, so I would like to cut that one down. I tried to look online of what the plants might be, my only guess was moneywort for the tall ones and some kind of anubias for the ones with big heart-shaped leaves, but your guess is better than mine.
I missed the heart-shape leaf plants. Frankly, I'm not sure about those, they may well be non-aquatic.

If you trim the stem plants, you cut them so that the top portion which is the growing tip becomes the new plant, thereby removing the lower portion. Stick the top portion in the gravel, it will root and grow. Depending upon how fast stem plants grow, they need regular trimming to keep them below the surface. No problem if they grow along the surface, but when they do this, most will lose lower leaves and you're left with bare stalks in the aquarium.

Finding a reliable "fish" store is worth it.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #15 of 15 Old 05-19-2011, 08:41 AM
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How are your fishies doing? :)

I just bought a shoal of 6 glofish for my daughter's birthday (she picked them out, but I will be the one caring for them). I am interested to hear about how your little guys fare. These are replacing our betta which we lost to some unknown illness (a long story involving many threads in the bettafish forum).

Also this thread has helped me considerably as I had some Ribbon Plant in my tank! (It is also called Lucky Bamboo, although unrelated to Bamboo and not native to Asia.) I took it out and put it in my hospital tank and lowered the water level there, so only the stems are in the water. I replaced it with some nice, stemmy, fully aquatic plants. :) So far, so good. I also have some anubias, java moss, and water sprite.

If your pH does get back on track I'd love to hear about it, especially if you choose to introduce new tank mates!
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