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Solitary Rift Lake Cichlid?

This is a discussion on Solitary Rift Lake Cichlid? within the Cichlids forums, part of the Freshwater and Tropical Fish category; --> Originally Posted by iamntbatman Wow, the stappersi look amazing. I really like that tank idea as well. Could I keep Malaysian Trumpet Snails in ...

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Solitary Rift Lake Cichlid?
Old 05-15-2008, 09:07 PM   #11
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamntbatman
Wow, the stappersi look amazing. I really like that tank idea as well. Could I keep Malaysian Trumpet Snails in the tank to keep the sand sifted, or would the fish eat them? I'm not sure how shell dwellers usually acquire their shells in the wild...I don't see why they wouldn't resort to violence.
I keep MTS in my multi tank. I think MTS are pretty much indestructible unless they encounter a puffer with a craving for escargot.
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Old 05-15-2008, 10:44 PM   #12
 
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Excellent. I tried to breed pond snails in my krib tank to provide a steady food supply for my puffers, but that was a no-go as apparently kribs are decent snail eaters. I wasn't sure if Africans would be the same way. I wouldn't even mind the prolific MTS breeding rate, as I could always use another source of food for my puffers. This idea is definitely getting written down. I just hope I can get my LFS to stock those stappersi if they don't already.
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Old 05-15-2008, 11:56 PM   #13
 
Kribs are Africans.
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Old 05-16-2008, 02:51 AM   #14
 
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herefishy, original post asked " are there ANY species that exhibit spousal loyalty along the lines of Kribs?" Only trying to provide options they may wish to consider. I should have paid closer attention. Your point is noted and I shall strive to be more helpful in the future.
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Old 05-16-2008, 09:30 AM   #15
 
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Originally Posted by herefishy
Kribs are Africans.
Kribs are pretty much American Cichlids but live on a different continent. Similar water parameter requirements, similar behavior, etc etc. I meant the completely different African fish, i.e. the Rift Lake ones. Heck, my LFS even keeps its kribs with the American Cichlids because their tanks would look so out of place next to the unplanted, crushed coral-bottomed tanks.
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Old 05-16-2008, 12:32 PM   #16
 
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Originally Posted by iamntbatman
Kribs are pretty much American Cichlids but live on a different continent. Similar water parameter requirements, similar behavior, etc etc. I meant the completely different African fish, i.e. the Rift Lake ones. Heck, my LFS even keeps its kribs with the American Cichlids because their tanks would look so out of place next to the unplanted, crushed coral-bottomed tanks.
I speak English as a language, does that make me English? Kribs are a riverine African cichlid. How could one equate they are American? They, along with other cichlids like some goby cichlids, some are also riverine, exhibit some similar habits of their South American cousins, but are distinctly African.

I would imagine that your lfs stocks kribs with his South Americans more out of convenience and space restraints. Keepers and breeders of these fish do not, generally, do this. Kribs are rather mild mannered and would adjust and be less boisterous than a ventralis, for example. Kribs although not a great community fish, are more forgiving and communal than many Africans when it comes to displaying aggression and territorial behavior. But, it must still understood, they are African cichlids, and they behave as such. A pairing couple can be downright ruthless when establishing their domain.

Harem brooders is a new term to me. Although many cichlids pair only for the purpose of mating, the males could hardly have a group that could be harem. In nature, the strong survives(and breeds). Some may consider a breeding colony as a male and his harem, but that is strictly a phenomenon that occurs in the aquarium. There have been instances where cichlids have been observed with a dominant male and several females. However, unlike elk or deer for example, th males do not "herd" the female group.

You spoke of "spousal loyalty. Some South Americans, discus and festivums come to mind, display such behavior. African goby cichlids, buffalo heads are a couple of Africans that stand out. I have had colonies of Julidochromis(sometimes called julies), chalinochromis, small lamprologus, and tetrachromis that have done the same. But, again, I do not know if this is just a phenomenon of being in an aquarium.
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Old 05-16-2008, 01:13 PM   #17
 
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Ok, I give up! I could go on about how eastern South America and Western Africa used to be connected and that, genetically speaking, kribensis are probably more closesly related to South American cichlids than their Rift Lake cousins, but I won't.

Anyway, by "harem brooding" I was talking about how, when stocking aquaria, Rift Lake cichlid keepers often keep a ratio of one male to four or so females. The male only chooses one mate but you still need this ratio to prevent violence. I used to term to contrast with something like kribensis, where you can have a good chance of success just putting one male and one female in a tank together.
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Old 05-16-2008, 04:30 PM   #18
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by herefishy
Harem brooders is a new term to me. Although many cichlids pair only for the purpose of mating, the males could hardly have a group that could be harem. In nature, the strong survives(and breeds). Some may consider a breeding colony as a male and his harem, but that is strictly a phenomenon that occurs in the aquarium. There have been instances where cichlids have been observed with a dominant male and several females. However, unlike elk or deer for example, th males do not "herd" the female group.
Actually, I have seen both the term and the behavior before applied to African Cichlids. Neolamprologus multifasciatus is most definitely a harem brooder. One male will defend a territory including the shells of multiple females. I can see it in the tank to my left as I type, with the dominant male having claimed the front of the tank with most of the shells, and all four females have picked shells under his protection. The other male has a shell back in the vallisnera grove, and gets chased back every time he comes out.

I think I've read that N. similus and N. brevis exhibit the same behavior, and I am sure I have read it in relation to other cichlids and other fish in general (most recently blue headed wrasses, though their fry are planktonic and harem breeder is more accurate than harem brooder.)

While iambatman may have been imprecise, I think what he's trying to get at is that pelvachromis spp. behave much like South and Central America cave brooding fish (Apistos, f'rinstance). In that, I would say he's right, but you're also right in that 1) there are other African Cichlids, both rift lake and otherwise, that exhibit similar behavior, and 2) a commonality of behavior does not make an identity of location.

The bottom line, though, is that Kribs may have to one the same subjective Feel as a South American cichlid, and there is not point whatsoever in arguing over that sort of thing. Though bemoaning unclear language is, of course, par for the course in every forum I've ever read.
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Old 05-16-2008, 06:54 PM   #19
 
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I strive to destroy the clarity of language. Think of me as a linguistic dadaist. Just kidding.

In other news, I popped in Petsmart a few minutes ago because I needed another gravel vac and lucky me, they had an infestation of malaysian trumpet snails. I thought they were selling them, and so I asked, "how much do you want for those trumpet snails?" and the guy told me, "Just take them! As many as you want!" I walked out with a big bag full that I didn't pay a dime for. I've put at least a couple in each of my tanks. Hopefully they'll get on the reproducin' so I'll have a decent amount to put in my upcoming tanks (I was planning on doing play sand as the substrate for my next community tank, plus the one I've been discussing here.)
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Old 05-18-2008, 01:09 PM   #20
 
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I've got a million, they just don't stop reproducing, so you shouldn't have any trouble. Let me know if you want me to send some more your way!
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