Lake Malawi Setup - Page 2
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Freshwater and Tropical Fish » Cichlids » Lake Malawi Setup

Lake Malawi Setup

This is a discussion on Lake Malawi Setup within the Cichlids forums, part of the Freshwater and Tropical Fish category; --> Originally Posted by lakemalawifish And, Peacocks are not sedate. They are very aggressive and can be extremely aggressive to their own kind. This information ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Convict Cichlids
Convict Cichlids
Discus
Discus
Like Tree1Likes

Reply
Old 01-21-2013, 07:06 PM   #11
 
AndrewM21's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakemalawifish View Post
And, Peacocks are not sedate. They are very aggressive and can be extremely aggressive to their own kind.
This information is rather misleading, peacocks are stunningly calm considering they are a cichlid species and they are not very aggressive either. I put 1/2" peacock fry in with my full grown peacocks with no ill effect (I have 5 or 6 in there right now), which shows they are not as aggressive as their counter parts.

If you are having aggression issues with your peacocks, then you have not done something right.
AndrewM21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2013, 07:25 PM   #12
 
Any fish can be nice one day and a real meanie the next, too bad we don't talk fish language to know exactly why and what's going on in our tanks. All we can do is watch and be prepared if somebody is being picked on and remove the aggressor.

Typically since Africans are mouthbrooders, they do not bother or try to eat fry. But that is not to say that it won't happen.

Peacocks are just as aggressive as any other fish, especially during breeding. As Peacocks mature and start spawning, watch out. The sweet little fish you never thought would hurt anything will try to take over the tank and make all of it's occupants miserable. This aggressiveness, whether it be a Peacock, Hap or Mbuna causes terrible stress to the fish, even the aggressor, which can lead to Malawi Bloat which is most always deadly to the fish. This same aggression is found in all male tanks of any African species. The males will reach breeding age and actually entice other males to their corner, which causes just as much stress to the other fish as a mixed male/female tank. We have had to pull males out of our all male show tanks and quarantine them until they calmed down. It is not a matter of doing anything right because no matter how hard you try to have the right combination of fish, things just happen... usually when you least expect it so it's best to be prepared.
lakemalawifish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2013, 07:39 PM   #13
 
AndrewM21's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakemalawifish View Post
Peacocks are just as aggressive as any other fish, especially during breeding. As Peacocks mature and start spawning, watch out. The sweet little fish you never thought would hurt anything will try to take over the tank and make all of it's occupants miserable. This aggressiveness, whether it be a Peacock, Hap or Mbuna causes terrible stress to the fish, even the aggressor, which can lead to Malawi Bloat which is most always deadly to the fish. This same aggression is found in all male tanks of any African species. The males will reach breeding age and actually entice other males to their corner, which causes just as much stress to the other fish as a mixed male/female tank. We have had to pull males out of our all male show tanks and quarantine them until they calmed down. It is not a matter of doing anything right because no matter how hard you try to have the right combination of fish, things just happen... usually when you least expect it so it's best to be prepared.
While you are right in a sense, I can't say I agree (from personal experience). My peacocks have been nothing but fluffy teddy bears, even through breeding. I have fully matured Aulonocara nyassae, mature Aulonocara baenschi, Aulonocara Rubescens, and Placidichromis Milomo in my aquarium and have zero aggression issues between them. My females have produced multiple batches of fry which shows they have been through breeding period, with no ill effect.

YMMV when it comes to keeping peacocks (as with any fish), but if we are going to discuss a species. Let's not judge a book by it's cover, when in reality, peacocks are not classified as "aggressive" to begin with.
djembekah likes this.

Last edited by AndrewM21; 01-21-2013 at 07:52 PM..
AndrewM21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2013, 09:09 PM   #14
 
Hey Andrew I hope you don't think I'm picking on you. I am glad you have a good mix in your tank, that is not easy to accomplish. Classifications of fish are really not that accurate anyway, it is just what is typical of that particular fish, and not all fish are typical. Your Benga and Ruby are great fish, we have one of each as well. Actually we have a F1 Benga and a Sunshine which are basically the same fish from different collection points. But as far as classifications go, you are right, most Peacocks are classified as mildly aggressive, which is the case with your Benga and Ruby. However, some are classified as aggressive, such as the Lwanda and any of the Jacobfreibergi's. The Placidochromis milomo you have is actually a Hap and is classified as aggressive, that big boy can get as large as 11" so I hope you have a big tank. But, in all fairness, we had a male Benga that reached sexual maturity and was attempting to fight with every male fish in the tank and there were not any females in there to fight over. While I was getting a QT tank prepared he just about bit the tail off of our Walteri so I had to set up 2 QT tanks, one for the bad boy and one for the injured fish. The Benga developed Bloat, I treated with Metro, but he never recovered and died. The Walteri's tail took a few weeks to heal, but he is doing well. So, you never really know what can happen, regardless of what the classification says.
lakemalawifish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2013, 09:29 PM   #15
 
AndrewM21's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakemalawifish View Post
Hey Andrew I hope you don't think I'm picking on you. I am glad you have a good mix in your tank, that is not easy to accomplish. Classifications of fish are really not that accurate anyway, it is just what is typical of that particular fish, and not all fish are typical. Your Benga and Ruby are great fish, we have one of each as well. Actually we have a F1 Benga and a Sunshine which are basically the same fish from different collection points. But as far as classifications go, you are right, most Peacocks are classified as mildly aggressive, which is the case with your Benga and Ruby. However, some are classified as aggressive, such as the Lwanda and any of the Jacobfreibergi's. The Placidochromis milomo you have is actually a Hap and is classified as aggressive, that big boy can get as large as 11" so I hope you have a big tank. But, in all fairness, we had a male Benga that reached sexual maturity and was attempting to fight with every male fish in the tank and there were not any females in there to fight over. While I was getting a QT tank prepared he just about bit the tail off of our Walteri so I had to set up 2 QT tanks, one for the bad boy and one for the injured fish. The Benga developed Bloat, I treated with Metro, but he never recovered and died. The Walteri's tail took a few weeks to heal, but he is doing well. So, you never really know what can happen, regardless of what the classification says.
I take nothing being said personally, we are all (or well most) mature fish enthusiasts trying to share our experience and learn, you should not let anything I say bother you as well.
----
As stated in my previous reply, YMMV when it comes to this species in particular, but I have had no issues with them. Any fish can be aggressive, actually, pretty much any living creature can be aggressive, I do not dispute this fact.

My point comes to the fact that you flat stated that the peacocks were an aggressive species and this is not entirely true, thus my reason for posting here. We can agree to disagree all day, but we will not benefit from it nor make any progress by doing it. My intent was simply to ensure that anyone reading has the facts about the species I referenced, not a one-sided opinion. I have very little interest in maintaining an active whizzing contest with you since my point is stated and can be sorted through by the opinions of the community.

Some fish species are highly aggressive and must be kept alone and/or with adequate tank mates, your post stated that peacocks were not sedate and were aggressive in general and towards each other, this was a "half glass full" kind of statement, which resulted in me posting on their behalf. My post was not based on what I read in regards to "classification", it's based on the fact that I have kept this species for a considerable amount of time and have observed their behavior. While you can say you have done the same, our opinions differ.

I will not dispute nor disagree with any personal experience you have had with them in particular, because this can be a result of anything (human error or fish nature), my point being, that if you adequately house the peacocks and care for them properly, you should not have aggression issues (in most cases), whereas with more aggressive species, you are likely to run into the issue more often.

For the record, I do have a 120 that's already setup and cycling and has been for the past 3 weeks, just for my peacocks .

Last edited by AndrewM21; 01-21-2013 at 09:33 PM..
AndrewM21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2013, 09:58 PM   #16
 
That is great, you will love that 120 and so will your fish! It is confusing when you start researching different fish and like in our case, the Benga was supposed to be mildly aggressive and ended up being a tank terrorist. I was shocked, there was nothing else strange going on in the tank but all of a sudden he started chasing all of the other fish around like a bandit. I would have expected such behavior from our Jacobfreibergi Otter Point because he is king of that tank, but the Otter Point was being chased by the Benga. So, you never really know what to expect. Good luck and have fun setting up your new tank!
lakemalawifish is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New Tank Prep for possible Lake Malawi robedadam Cichlids 2 09-26-2012 01:14 AM
Lake Malawi Cichlids ladayen Cichlids 1 08-19-2011 02:05 PM
lake malawi chichlids rhessling Cichlids 3 03-10-2011 11:23 AM
55gal Lake Malawi reggaemylitis Freshwater Journals 2 07-17-2008 02:14 PM
Lake malawi territorial question assualt911 Cichlids 3 01-09-2008 11:38 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:57 PM.