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This is a discussion on Discus and BGK within the Cichlids forums, part of the Freshwater and Tropical Fish category; --> Farlowella: The F. acus is probably not actually F. acus . This species is very rarely exported and in fact is now a highly ...

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Old 03-21-2010, 07:03 PM   #41
 
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Farlowella: The F. acus is probably not actually F. acus. This species is very rarely exported and in fact is now a highly endangered species because of destruction of its natural habitat for farming or ranching and I don't remember what all. According to my research, F. vittata has been regularly exported and usually called F. acus which is very similar in appearance. There are some photos and text on our Profile of F. vittata. I have three, "sold" as acus but obviously vittata or so I assume.

They do well in groups, I had one for several months that was fine, but I like this fish so much I decided to get two more. One looks thinner than the other two, so I'm assuming perhaps a male and two females; I can't distinguish the "bristles" on the rostrum which the male develops at maturity, but I don't know how long it takes for this species to mature or how old my fish may be. The three never seem to squabble (males sometimes do, though nothing serious). It would be neat to have them spawn; it is not that difficult.

Speaking of spawning, I did the pwc today as usual, and in the 90g I moved the Nematobrycon palmeri and N. lacortei over to the 115g. Which meant I was knocking over wood a bit. Afterwards, spotted half a dozen fry, about 1/4 inch long, grazing through the brush algae on one of the standing wood "stumps." At first I assumed it was the pencilfish, Nannostomus eques, which are always spawning in that tank and a few times fry survive predation. But the shape was not quite right, and the colouration was different; after some looking around, I figured out it has to be the Hyphessobrycon metae. These are very rare in the hobby, I've only once ever seen them in stores, and that was when I bought the seven I have in November 2008 from one of my lfs that carries almost exclusively wild-caught fish from South America. These were from the Peruvian Amazon basin.

Frogbit: throw it out usually. It is a funny plant, the leaves develop yellow edges quite a bit, I have some in my spare 33g with the top open (can't in the 90g or 115g or the hatchets would all be dried out on the floor next morning) but seems to be the same [thought it might be excess humidity]. I've changed ferts, back to Flourish twice weekly, and I think it was better today, so it may just need good nutrient fertilization. It grows very fast, as most surface plants do because of the plentiful CO2 from the air and the light right above. Anyway, when the weather warms up, I will send you some by mail. I sent some down to Stephanie in California but for reasons unknown the US Post took a week to get it there (my package of other plants to Texas arrived in 3 days) and it was dead. With our Priority Post I should be able to get it to you in 1-2 days, so when the weather is warm in Quebec, let me know. I don't have any insulation stuff for cold weather.

On the water change: the hardness in the tap water and/or tank water will buffer the pH. With my tanks at zero GH and KH, and my tap the same or maybe <1 dKH, the pH of the tank only goes up a few decimal points when I do a 50% water change. Not enough to cause issues. In your case, the replacement water will also be RO & tap mixed, so once you work out the proportions, you should have no significant changes. Keeping some hardness does help to prevent the pH lowering too far, as in my 115g, which is at 6.0 and with tap water at 7 it rise to about 6.3 with a 50% change.

Byron.

Last edited by Byron; 03-21-2010 at 07:06 PM..
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Old 03-21-2010, 09:10 PM   #42
 
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I think I will only get one farlowella at first and then maybe I will get one or two more later on.

Congratulations on breeding the purple tetras (hyphessobrycon metae)! They are a very goreous fish! Do you plan on removing them from the tank and raising them or do you plan on leaving them in the community tank.

I am not sure if I will be able to get a 115 gallon tank, I am waiting to find out if the one I want is still available. Would a 90 gallon be okay for my stocking list or would I have to reduce my stocking list ?

It would be so great if you could send some frogbit! Thank you so much for offering that!

I think I have finally got this whole water change-RO thing understood, thanks to your help and the help of other members on this forum!
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Old 03-22-2010, 01:25 PM   #43
 
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Congratulations on breeding the purple tetras (hyphessobrycon metae)! They are a very goreous fish! Do you plan on removing them from the tank and raising them or do you plan on leaving them in the community tank.
Thanks, though I didn't "do" anything; but it is rewarding to know that when we make the effort to provide the water parameters that these fish need to be healthy long-term, they will be healthy and spawning is proof of that. I leave the fry there, let nature takes its course. Same in the SE Asian tank where I have (now) four different ages of Chocolate Gourami fry and two (or maybe three) of Pygmy Sparkling Gourami fry.

Quote:
I am not sure if I will be able to get a 115 gallon tank, I am waiting to find out if the one I want is still available. Would a 90 gallon be okay for my stocking list or would I have to reduce my stocking list ?
I would think 8 discus a bit of a push in a 90g (with everything else), maybe five or six. And possibly one of the tetra groups should go. As Aunt kymmie pointed out, it is the feeding issue that is important with discus; Jack Wattley says the same thing repeatedly, the discus are slow sedate fish and any rambunctious feeding "frenzy" from other fish is a risk.
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Old 03-22-2010, 05:24 PM   #44
 
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Does the quantity of water have more effect than the actual size? For example, would an 8X1 foot 90 gallon tank be better than a 6X20" 115 gallon tank? I am pretty sure the 115 isnt for sale anymore so I think I might have to get a slightly smaller tank, however my problem is: most of the tanks that are less than 115, even the 90 gallons are only 4 foot long, just taller than a 55, therefore there is more water but not more space. I will try to get the bigest aquarium possible anyways.

I think that I will probably get only 6 discus instead of 8 discus, if I get anything smaller than a six foot tank.

Anyways i will let you know what happens...

The brand new tanks at my LFS arent too expensive but they dont come witrh anything but the tank,stand and hood (lights too). Then I would need to get the filters and heaters etc...
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Old 03-22-2010, 06:56 PM   #45
 
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Originally Posted by dylan94 View Post
Does the quantity of water have more effect than the actual size? For example, would an 8X1 foot 90 gallon tank be better than a 6X20" 115 gallon tank? I am pretty sure the 115 isnt for sale anymore so I think I might have to get a slightly smaller tank, however my problem is: most of the tanks that are less than 115, even the 90 gallons are only 4 foot long, just taller than a 55, therefore there is more water but not more space. I will try to get the bigest aquarium possible anyways.

I think that I will probably get only 6 discus instead of 8 discus, if I get anything smaller than a six foot tank.

Anyways i will let you know what happens...

The brand new tanks at my LFS arent too expensive but they dont come witrh anything but the tank,stand and hood (lights too). Then I would need to get the filters and heaters etc...
Appropriate tank has several components. First, obviously, the water volume which affects the number of fish by reason of the bioload. Second, the dimensions. Longer tanks work better for active swimming fish, and you can create a "river" aquascape better. Taller tanks are less suitable generally because the surface area is reduced even though water volume may be the same, plus some fish do not suit such tanks (swimming tetras); angelfish do, discus less so.

Also there is the visual aspect. A 90g that is 8 feet long by 1 foot wide would be for me a real problem to aquascape; the length is nice, but the height and width would "look" wrong with such length, unless you had the tank along a wall and aquascaped as a river. But I would go with a standard 90g (and you're correct, they are 4 feet length) or a five-foot 115+ tank.

My 115g is 5 long by 2 high, and the 90g is 4 long by 2 high. I like both, by which I mean that sitting in front of either, they look "right" if you follow me, in terms of the dimensions. The 90g is working very well as my flooded forest, no actively swimming fish, just cruisers (discus would be lovely in this one, 5-6 probably), the 115g works as a riverscape bank with shoaling characins and corydoras.
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Old 03-22-2010, 07:17 PM   #46
 
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So for my tank would you recommend a 4 foot or a 5 foot (regardless of the volume)?
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Old 03-23-2010, 09:55 AM   #47
 
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Originally Posted by dylan94 View Post
So for my tank would you recommend a 4 foot or a 5 foot (regardless of the volume)?
Not exactly. My thinking is that the visual aspect of an aquarium should be considered. You may be different in your perception of space and such, but when I look at an aquarium I like to see a rectangular space that is balanced, meaning the length and height mainly plus the width front to back. I find the standard 90g at 4 feet length by 2 feet height looks "balanced" as a rectangle; extending the length by one foot to five by two also looks "balanced". A six-foot by two-foot starts to "distort" that perception but it still (to me) looks balanced. But the 6-foot by 1-foot you mentioned would to me look "odd" somehow, I just don't see that space as "balanced."

This is all personal perception. I prefer rectangles to squares in almost everything. But there are cases where a square tank could be effective, with certain types of fish. I think discus and all characins generally suit rectangular tanks better.
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Old 03-24-2010, 03:43 PM   #48
 
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I completely agree on that. Tanks look much better when the length and height are somewhat proportionate. 90 gallon aquariums are a very nice size. If I can't get 115, I will get a 90g, obviously limiting my stocking list a bit.

For a 90 gallon I think I will do:
-6 discus
-2 german blue rams
-2 cockatoo dwarf cichlid
-1 twig catfish
-8 corydoras sterbai
-8 cardinal tetras
-8 marbled hatchets
-8 plack phantom tetras

That list seems a bit long, but in reality the half the list is tetras and hatchets who don't take much space and have small bioloads. I will originally get 3 of each of the dwarf cichlid species and once they pair off will return the "extras" to the LFS. I decided to take out the sparkling gouramis because, I don't have that much room and also, my tank is all south american, so putting in asian gouramis would ruin that :( But, who knows, maybe one day I will do an Asian tank with gouramis and other characins:)
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