Why does my tetra have a point on it's stomach? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 04-12-2012, 10:16 AM Thread Starter
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Question Why does my tetra have a point on it's stomach?

Hi I have 4 neon tetras, and a couple of them have this very pronounced point on their stomach. The bottom of them looks like a triangle. Is this bad? I've had them for about a month now and I hadn't noticed it before yesterday. It's pretty much impossible to get a pic because they move so fast. Thanks so much!
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post #2 of 6 Old 04-12-2012, 12:15 PM
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Well, without a photo we can't offer much. If you sit still in front of the tank, camera ready, for several minutes, perhaps they will be motionless long enough for a group photo?

Neon tetra swimming rapidly around the tank is in itself cause for concern, as this is not their normal behaviour. They are not active swimmers. Perhaps some more data on the tank will also help; how long set up, what fish, tank size, environment (plants, hiding spots, decor), etc.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #3 of 6 Old 04-12-2012, 03:44 PM Thread Starter
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Okay, I'll try to get a pic up as soon as I can. :)

Really? Ever since I got them they've always sort of darted around. Well the tank is a 55 gallons, I got it in February, had some problems, started all over, and now have had the tetras for around a month. I'm really new with all this, so I don't really know much! :) So I have 4 tetras, and three platies, two females and a male. As of about 5 mins ago, I also have a baby platy that I have in a separate breeder net in the tank. As far as decorations go, I have plants on each side, and a little coral reef thing that has a bunch of grooves they can hide in. I also have like a little rock cave thing. I was told to keep the middle fairly empty, so that's what I have. I have a heater and lamps and filter and everything. But yeah, the tetras sometimes even look like they're fighting because they'll chase each other around. Sorry for the long post and thanks in advance!
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post #4 of 6 Old 04-12-2012, 04:34 PM
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Originally Posted by peachyqui View Post
Okay, I'll try to get a pic up as soon as I can. :)

Really? Ever since I got them they've always sort of darted around. Well the tank is a 55 gallons, I got it in February, had some problems, started all over, and now have had the tetras for around a month. I'm really new with all this, so I don't really know much! :) So I have 4 tetras, and three platies, two females and a male. As of about 5 mins ago, I also have a baby platy that I have in a separate breeder net in the tank. As far as decorations go, I have plants on each side, and a little coral reef thing that has a bunch of grooves they can hide in. I also have like a little rock cave thing. I was told to keep the middle fairly empty, so that's what I have. I have a heater and lamps and filter and everything. But yeah, the tetras sometimes even look like they're fighting because they'll chase each other around. Sorry for the long post and thanks in advance!
Chasing each other is fine, and normal, and it is good you see that. All characins (tetra, hatchetfish, pencilfish) live in large groups and have social, aggressive, spawning interaction behaviours depending upon species. Some like to consider it "play," as kittens and puppies do; but I am more inclined to think that while it may be exuberance there is also probably something more serious mixed in. What we do know is that this is essential to the health of the fish because it prevents stress which occurs from too small a group.

In new tanks, and for a while after being introduced, most characins will be unsettled; they usually remain closer together than they will be as they are settled in, and they may swim around more than later. Many factors can affect behaviours, from water parameters, too bright overhead light, not sufficient "stuff" in the tank to provide security, etc. Your plants are excellent, and you will likely see the fish calming down in a few weeks.

I'll check the photo when you post it, just in case; it is most likely nothing.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #5 of 6 Old 04-17-2012, 10:29 AM Thread Starter
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Can someone tell me how to post a video? I think that would probably be easier see what's going on because I can zoom in on the tetras and you can also get a sense of the whole tank... my platies also seem to be a little overly-active now... I don't know.
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post #6 of 6 Old 04-18-2012, 11:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peachyqui View Post
Can someone tell me how to post a video? I think that would probably be easier see what's going on because I can zoom in on the tetras and you can also get a sense of the whole tank... my platies also seem to be a little overly-active now... I don't know.
On the video, I had to find out myself. You cannot upoad a video direct to TFK, but if you upload it to say YouTube, you can then just copy and paste the link in your post here.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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