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Tetras hiding???

This is a discussion on Tetras hiding??? within the Characins forums, part of the Freshwater and Tropical Fish category; --> Yes, I know you weren't talking about water parameters, but kitten mentioned needing more frequent water tests and changes. The Aquaclear 20 does produce ...

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Old 08-30-2010, 11:00 AM   #11
 
Yes, I know you weren't talking about water parameters, but kitten mentioned needing more frequent water tests and changes.

The Aquaclear 20 does produce some current, but nothing crazy. I have it set down to the lowest setting.




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Once again, I'm not talking about water parameters. There is more than one way to overstock.

As for Neons hiding... does your filter create alot of current?
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:03 AM   #12
 
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Yes, I know you weren't talking about water parameters, but kitten mentioned needing more frequent water tests and changes.

The Aquaclear 20 does produce some current, but nothing crazy. I have it set down to the lowest setting.
Even on the lowest setting it's usually a tiny bit too much for Neons. It will work fairly well obviously, but Neons just hate all that water movement... When I had the HoB filter on my tank they would school real closely and stay hidden (nervous) but now that I use a sponge they're out all over the place and not really "schooling" at all.
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:08 AM   #13
 
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Even on the lowest setting it's usually a tiny bit too much for Neons. It will work fairly well obviously, but Neons just hate all that water movement... When I had the HoB filter on my tank they would school real closely and stay hidden (nervous) but now that I use a sponge they're out all over the place and not really "schooling" at all.
Interesting. So you're using a sponge with an air pump?

They seemed to swimming around the way you described until I added the plants. My plan now is to remove the xray and glowlight tetras and let the neons be for a week or so. See if they just need time to acclimate to the new plants. I also added a lava rock with some moss on it. Forgot to mention that earlier. I have that towards the back corner of the tank. The tetras don't seem to mess with it too much, but the guppies tend to nip at the moss and knock pieces loose.
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:10 AM   #14
 
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you could try it but slowing the flow in the hob further then originally intended will disrupt it's efficiency and with that many fish it isn't something that should be done don't you agree??
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:12 AM   #15
 
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Interesting. So you're using a sponge with an air pump?

They seemed to swimming around the way you described until I added the plants. My plan now is to remove the xray and glowlight tetras and let the neons be for a week or so. See if they just need time to acclimate to the new plants. I also added a lava rock with some moss on it. Forgot to mention that earlier. I have that towards the back corner of the tank. The tetras don't seem to mess with it too much, but the guppies tend to nip at the moss and knock pieces loose.
The more comfortable they are the less you will see them swimming together like that. Mine all have their own little bubble of space within the tank that they only really break during feeding time and sometimes they'll visit each other. xD

And yeah, sponge filter with air pump (as of only last week). Works good in combination with the plants since my plants don't like all that water flow either.

Last edited by CaliforniaFishkeeper; 08-30-2010 at 11:14 AM..
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:13 AM   #16
 
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The more comfortable they are the less you will see them swimming together like that. Mine all have their own little bubble of space within the tank that they only really break during feeding time and sometimes they'll visit each other. xD
Interesting that they stay separate since they are reported to be shoaling fish. How many do you have and how big is your tank?
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:19 AM   #17
 
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Interesting that they stay separate since they are reported to be shoaling fish. How many do you have and how big is your tank?
That is shoaling. What they shouldn't be doing is schooling. Which is swimming in those tight groups.

A shoal just refers to the Neons social group.
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:31 AM   #18
 
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lol they stick together when they are stressed or scared
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:32 AM   #19
 
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lol they stick together when they are stressed or scared
Exactly.
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Old 08-30-2010, 12:52 PM   #20
 
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You've been given good advice by member in the previous posts, so I'm just going to elaborate on their behaviour.

Shoaling fish live in large groups. They feel more secure, less threatened, and many species develop interactive behaviours between fish which can be fascinating to observe. They may not swim together all the time, maybe only now and then, but they know they are all there together and that eases their stress which means healthier fish. Characins (tetras belong to the family Characidae) communicate with each other quite a lot. If you have a read of the general information on "Characins" in our profiles--click on the name "characins" rather than list the species--you will learn how they do this and why. They are a highly evolved group of fish.

Before you added the plants they had no where to "hide" if threatened. Forest fish are programmed by nature to swim among sunken logs and branches, aquatic plants or under overhanging marginal vegetation, etc. They "expect" to have hiding places if they feel threatened. In a relatively bare tank, that security is missing, and they will always feel vulnerable. They do not know they are in no danger; they only know what their instinct tells them, and that is, they are in vulnerable. Providing the plants offered them the security they expected, and they will take advantage.

Once they are settled, they will adjust and be out more in the open. It is an interesting fact that fish that have adequate refuge in an aquarium will be out in the open more than if they have little refuge, simply because the places of refuge being there tells them they have hiding spots if it becomes necessary.

A word on water flow. This also has a significant impact on stress. Again, these are forest fish; most of them occur in slow-flowing streams, pools and flooded forest. There are exceptions--this info is always included in our profiles, mentioned under the fish's natural habitat so you know how to set up the aquarium for the species. In small tanks like a 10g, a sponge filter is in my view the absolute best. I use a sponge filter in all my smaller tanks (under 55g). You might want to consider that.

What you observed before you added the plants may have seemed "OK" but in actual fact the fish were probably stressed by the issues mentioned above. Now they are getting accustomed to having what they expect, and once they realize the "danger" is no longer imminent, they will be out and about.

Final comment on numbers. Tetra need to be in groups of at least six of each species. I agree with prior comments that a 10g is not sufficient "space" for 18+ fish. Removing the X-ray [which I assume is Pristella maxillaris] and the Glowlights is wise. A group of six neons, plus some bottom fish like corys, will be a nice display with the plants (good idea having live plants). A piece of bogwood will add a nice touch and provide some more "surface" for the corys that love to browse surfaces. Corydoras need to be in a group too, 5 is a nice number and with the smaller (under 2-inch) species will be OK. Or one of the dwarf species, but they are more finicky about water conditions.

Byron.
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