How many tetras can I fit in a 10G?
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How many tetras can I fit in a 10G?

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How many tetras can I fit in a 10G?
Old 05-10-2010, 01:43 PM   #1
 
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How many tetras can I fit in a 10G?

I have an idea for a tank (currently housing 10 green terrors, they're small.)

I want a sand or fine gravel substrate, a CPO, some ghost shrimp, and several tetras.

My question, is how many tetras can I fit in a 10G?
The ph is 6.5, with driftwood, plants, etc.

I know the inch/gallon rule is thrown out the window with tetras especially because their bodies are so thin.
I'm considering:

8 Galaxy Rasboras
8 Neons
8 Black Neons
8 Ember Tetras

could I pick two or three of those species?
Should I lose the CPO and go with 3 Pygmy Cories or/and 3 ottos?

Right now the tanks got 10 green terrors between 1-3 inches long... so it's got a very healthy bacteria colony. Ammonia and Nitrites stay 0, and nitrates are under 20 when I change 20-30% of the water once a week.
I do have an algae infestation in that tank though.
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Old 05-11-2010, 06:39 AM   #2
 
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Galaxy rasboras are really nice looking fish but can be hard to find and are pretty darn expensive (I've seen them for $8-9 a pop). Personally, I wouldn't do both the neons and the black neons just because they're so similar looking. Also, mixing tetras and the rasboras means you don't really have a "biotope" type so I'm not sure if that's problematic for you. If it were mine I'd probably go with the galaxy rasboras and ember tetras for the contrast. Black neons do look really nice, though.

If you do decide to do pygmy cories rather than the CPO I definitely suggest getting more than three. Watching a bunch of them swim around together is reason enough to get a nice sized group.
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Old 05-11-2010, 12:13 PM   #3
 
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I would not have neons or black neons in a 10g, in my view there is not enough space. These characins, though quiet, do like to swim around. The galaxy rasbora (actually a danio) and the ember are good possibilities, but not together.

Embers (Hyphessobrycon amandae) remain very small, they are one of the smallest tetra, and a group of 9+ would be beautiful in a planted 10g. I have 11 in my 90g and they do sparkle among the plants. They are wild caught, as far as I know, and prefer soft acidic water as you mention you have, so a perfect match. Pygmy corys (Corydoras pygmaeus) should be in larger groups, minimum 6 but more is better; they tend to waste away in small groups. They are highly social. And soft acidic water is ideal, and they love lots of plants and wood to browse. Either of the other dwarf cory species would also work, same requirements.

The galaxy rasbora/danio I'm assuming is the recently discovered fish (2006) originally named Microrasbora "galaxy" as it was presumed to be a rasbora, then described by Roberts in 2007 (who decided it was actually a danio) as Celestichthys margaritatus in a new genus he erected for this fish; but not all ichthyologists accept this, and some including Kullander use the name Danio margaritatus which is now the valid name according to the California Academy of Sciences. Whatever it's called, it comes from waters in Burma with a pH of 7.3-7.5 and moderate hardness. Most available fish are now commercially bred but prefer this range in water parameters for optimum health.

Hope this helps a bit.

Byron.
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Old 05-11-2010, 01:30 PM   #4
 
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Thanks!

I'd read that the galaxy rasbora was actually a danio, but if I ask someone about "Celestial Pearl Danio" they usually have no idea what I'm talking about. If I say galaxy rasbora, they know. I was just trying to use a common (if incorrect) name.

Can you think of any other tetras that would work?
perhaps:
Boraras maculatus (dwarf spotted rasbora)
Danio choprai (Glowlight Danio) (Web sites seem to disagree- many say a PH of 6.3-7.1 with kh 1-20. seems like a big jump.)

I'm also trying to figure out how many I could have...
Should I use inch-per-gallon?

I thought the mass of the fish was really the important thing... So wouldn't that mean I could have something like:
7 spotted dwarf rasbora
10 ember tetras
8 pygmy cories
with some RCS as well?
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Old 05-12-2010, 05:58 AM   #5
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Whatever it's called, it comes from waters in Burma with a pH of 7.3-7.5 and moderate hardness.
Huh. I knew that they came from rice paddies so I always assumed it was soft, acidic water. You learn something every day, as they say!
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Old 05-12-2010, 07:40 AM   #6
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redchigh View Post
Thanks!

I'd read that the galaxy rasbora was actually a danio, but if I ask someone about "Celestial Pearl Danio" they usually have no idea what I'm talking about. If I say galaxy rasbora, they know. I was just trying to use a common (if incorrect) name.

Can you think of any other tetras that would work?
perhaps:
Boraras maculatus (dwarf spotted rasbora)
Danio choprai (Glowlight Danio) (Web sites seem to disagree- many say a PH of 6.3-7.1 with kh 1-20. seems like a big jump.)

I'm also trying to figure out how many I could have...
Should I use inch-per-gallon?

I thought the mass of the fish was really the important thing... So wouldn't that mean I could have something like:
7 spotted dwarf rasbora
10 ember tetras
8 pygmy cories
with some RCS as well?
25 fish, even smallish fish in ten gallon ,will take great attention to keep water quality up assuming the fish are fed each day in my opinion.
Pygmy corys would prolly be last fish I introduced once the tank was a few months old.
I use a ten gal for quarantine tank and it seems it is always occupied. I sometimes marvel at numbers of fish recommended for these small tanks based entirely on my expierience with keeping fish in them.
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Old 05-12-2010, 01:03 PM   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamntbatman View Post
Huh. I knew that they came from rice paddies so I always assumed it was soft, acidic water. You learn something every day, as they say!
The original fish (first discoveries) were from boggy areas and shallow ponds northeast of Inle Lake in northern Burma, at more than 1000 metres above sea level. The ponds are a foot deep at most, water is clear, water temperature in January was 22-24C (72-75F), pH 7.3-7.5. Frequent spawnings in aquaria have shown that the fish can adjust well to softer slightly acidic water, but preferences are still given as slightly basic/alkaline for optimum health. There were reports of near-extinction after the enormous collecting that was done (over 5,000 fish were being collected each day), but subsequently the fish was discovered in a few other sites, and now most available fish are (so I read) captive-bred.

There is a good article on this fish in the May 2010 issue of TFH from which the afore-mentioned water data is taken.

We never stop learning; and I love it. What I have learned from this forum in the past year could fill a book. B.
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Old 05-12-2010, 01:13 PM   #8
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redchigh View Post
Thanks!

I'd read that the galaxy rasbora was actually a danio, but if I ask someone about "Celestial Pearl Danio" they usually have no idea what I'm talking about. If I say galaxy rasbora, they know. I was just trying to use a common (if incorrect) name.

Can you think of any other tetras that would work?
perhaps:
Boraras maculatus (dwarf spotted rasbora)
Danio choprai (Glowlight Danio) (Web sites seem to disagree- many say a PH of 6.3-7.1 with kh 1-20. seems like a big jump.)

I'm also trying to figure out how many I could have...
Should I use inch-per-gallon?

I thought the mass of the fish was really the important thing... So wouldn't that mean I could have something like:
7 spotted dwarf rasbora
10 ember tetras
8 pygmy cories
with some RCS as well?
I'm with 1077, all these in a 10g is really pushing it. But perhaps you are not actually thinking all of these together.

I had really never paid any attention to Embers, until one of my local stores got them and I decided to get a dozen since I had ample space in my 90g flooded Amazon aquascape. They are incredibly beautiful fish in soft, acidic water when they colour up (they were very washed out in the store, not surprising of course), and they are active, sometimes in a shoal, sometimes separated into smaller groups, sometimes a few loners, but swimming all over the tank in and out among plants. A very nice fish for smaller planted tanks with soft water. I have frequently observed pre-spawning rituals, but no evidence of spawning although these fish like most characins spawn pre-dawn so it may be occurring unnoticed.

The dwarf rasbora species are also ideal fish for a 10g planted soft water tank. The several species of Boraras are very much like the Embers. I have B. merah in my SE Asian tank, and these plus a couple of other species are seen now and then (at least here). I think from my experience these "rasbora" are better in smaller tanks on their own (or with suitable bottom fish). Mine get lost in the 70g.

Byron.
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Old 05-12-2010, 01:19 PM   #9
 
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Well I would like a variety of fish...

Maybe something else rather than the spotted danio... Was thinking neons but you're not the only person that told be that was a bad idea.

I'm kind of basing my stocking on a diseaster I have.
I put 3 guppies in a 10G, and the population exploded.

I keep a CLOSE eye on water parameters, do weekly water changes of 30-40%. I feed every 2-3 days. (Of course they graze on algae.)

Notrates are never over 20, normally never over 15.

You don't wanna know how many I have in that tank-(probably over 2 dozen, well over a dozen adults). Needless to say, the bioload is WAY higher than the stocking level I'm talking about for my new 10G setup.

I may cut the numbers down to 6 each... but I would like the species present.

Last edited by redchigh; 05-12-2010 at 01:28 PM..
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Old 05-14-2010, 03:11 PM   #10
 
If the tank is heavily planted to help with water quality I think its do able. Your looking at a pretty high maintenance tank. Like someone said the galaxys are expensive fish, imo their are cooler nano fish out their for that price. Most will have to be ordered online though.
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