How to make schooling fish stay tighter
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Freshwater and Tropical Fish » Characins » How to make schooling fish stay tighter

How to make schooling fish stay tighter

This is a discussion on How to make schooling fish stay tighter within the Characins forums, part of the Freshwater and Tropical Fish category; --> in my 29g i have 7 rummynose and 6 neon tetras. i no tht if u get a predator or if u hv alot ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Ember Tetra
Ember Tetra
Glowlight Tetra
Glowlight Tetra
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By SeaHorse

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
How to make schooling fish stay tighter
Old 02-15-2013, 08:44 PM   #1
 
tankman12's Avatar
 
How to make schooling fish stay tighter

in my 29g i have 7 rummynose and 6 neon tetras. i no tht if u get a predator or if u hv alot than they will school more. but what would be some predators i could get that would not eat the fish.

Last edited by tankman12; 02-15-2013 at 08:47 PM..
tankman12 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 11:15 AM   #2
 
SeaHorse's Avatar
 
Adding a predator is cruel and causes stress which over time causes death. It will cause the group to scatter and hide.
Adding dither fish makes a species more comfortable. Fish that tend to hide (Cichlids) are made more comfortable if another species can be seen above who's behavior is calming. The dither fish are not freaked out... ok.. things must be ok.

Adding more of the same creates a more confident group and are more likely to school. Don't be confused by shoaling... and schooling. Schooling is swimming together as a group in the same direction in a coordinated manner. Shoaling...they like to be with their own kind and don't nec swim in that tight group.

Both your tetras are "shoaling" and you are at the minimums for the groups. Neons are tiny, you can easily increase their numbers in a 29. Lots of live plants in an aquarium and frequent water changes will allow you to up numbers a bit too.
SeaHorse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 12:14 PM   #3
 
tankman12's Avatar
 
I have kribensis and they even swim at the top sometimes. So it must be a safe enviorment. There is a lot of fish in it though. Theres 2 dawn, 2 bumblebee, 2 sunset platies, 1 pearl gourami, 1 peppered cory cat, 1 juli cory cat, 1 albino bushynose pleco, 6 neons, 7 rummynoses, 1 bango catfish, and 1 neon blue stiphodon goby. Im moveing the kribensis to a breeding tank. What about cory cats? Do they school well? What else are some good schooling fish?
tankman12 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2013, 08:06 PM   #4
 
Byron's Avatar
 
You have no space left for fish in the tank.

Most freshwater fish do not "school" as marine fish do. Rummynose tetra are about the best for this, but no FW species school in the strict sense.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2013, 07:29 PM   #5
 
Adamson's Avatar
 
Add more fish of the particular species you want to school. Bigger schools look much more impressive anyway!
Adamson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2013, 07:38 AM   #6
 
jaysee's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
You have no space left for fish in the tank.

Most freshwater fish do not "school" as marine fish do. Rummynose tetra are about the best for this, but no FW species school in the strict sense.
Not all the time at least. Many of them do at times throught the day, but the tank needs to be large enough to allow it. It's not like fish either school or shoal - that's just a description of what the group happens to be doing at any given moment. Granted, some species spend more time doing one than another.

Aside from the group moving from one place to another, fish school for protection - the reason why it's said that adding a predator will make them school instead of shoal. a group of fish in a tank that are comfortable and not threadened tend to spread out and mill about (shoaling). Obviously you don't want to add a real predator or that's all you'll have left in the tank, but often just a large centerpiece fish will do. Again - you don't want your fish tightly schooling all of the time, as that's an indication of stress. But, the larger fish will get them to school from time to time.
jaysee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2013, 11:06 AM   #7
 
Byron's Avatar
 
The definition of "school" and "shoal" is not always clear. The ones I tend to use apply "school" solely to marine fish, and this means the species remains together 24/7, they hunt/feed as a pack, etc. As far as I know, no freshwater fish does this, at least not strictly. "Shoal" on the other hand refers to the freshwater species habit of remaining in large groups that may form a "pack" for various reasons, but also separate partially and/or completely, and they never hunt as a pack with the sole aim of bringing down prey together.

I acknowledge there are sources who reverse these definitions, or who do not apply them like this at all. This is why I tend to use shoaling for those freshwater fish that must have a group to avoid stress in general, such as the characins, cyprinids, some catfish, etc. It is certainly true that the larger the space they are in, the more they generally remain close. And when threatened they will tighten the shoal even more.

Many of these species do not actively swim much to begin with. Rummys as I mentioned are the best example of an active-swimming fish that does tend to remain in a close group while swimming through the tank. Many others, such as cardinals, the Rosy clade species, and so on are quite sedate, remaining in close proximity under the shelter of plants, branches, etc. Rasbora are like this too.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2013, 01:39 AM   #8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
The definition of "school" and "shoal" is not always clear. The ones I tend to use apply "school" solely to marine fish, and this means the species remains together 24/7, they hunt/feed as a pack, etc. As far as I know, no freshwater fish does this, at least not strictly. "Shoal" on the other hand refers to the freshwater species habit of remaining in large groups that may form a "pack" for various reasons, but also separate partially and/or completely, and they never hunt as a pack with the sole aim of bringing down prey together.

I acknowledge there are sources who reverse these definitions, or who do not apply them like this at all. This is why I tend to use shoaling for those freshwater fish that must have a group to avoid stress in general, such as the characins, cyprinids, some catfish, etc. It is certainly true that the larger the space they are in, the more they generally remain close. And when threatened they will tighten the shoal even more.

Many of these species do not actively swim much to begin with. Rummys as I mentioned are the best example of an active-swimming fish that does tend to remain in a close group while swimming through the tank. Many others, such as cardinals, the Rosy clade species, and so on are quite sedate, remaining in close proximity under the shelter of plants, branches, etc. Rasbora are like this too.

Byron.
OH YEA??
Kokanee salmon. EXPLAIN THAT.
Jorunder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2013, 10:23 AM   #9
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorunder View Post
OH YEA??
Kokanee salmon. EXPLAIN THAT.
Explain what?
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2013, 11:06 AM   #10
 
SeaHorse's Avatar
 
Jorunder... Do Kokanee Salmon school? Is that what you are asking? By Byron's definition of Schooling / Shoaling... why does Kokanee Salmon act the way it does? Just wanting to clarify your question.
jentralala likes this.
SeaHorse is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Shoaling and Schooling Fish es31710 Freshwater and Tropical Fish 4 03-06-2012 08:49 PM
Good schooling fish? Tannerj Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 13 02-13-2012 11:52 AM
who knows anything about schooling fish? akbr Freshwater and Tropical Fish 9 02-10-2008 07:24 AM
Are these schooling fish.... jsm11482 Freshwater and Tropical Fish 12 08-27-2006 12:49 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:00 PM.