what do I do after a disease in the tank?
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what do I do after a disease in the tank?

This is a discussion on what do I do after a disease in the tank? within the Catfish forums, part of the Freshwater and Tropical Fish category; --> Well I am relatively new to fish keeping and have just been dealing with my first fish disease (fin rot) which affected 2 out ...

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what do I do after a disease in the tank?
Old 05-01-2013, 10:35 AM   #1
 
what do I do after a disease in the tank?

Well I am relatively new to fish keeping and have just been dealing with my first fish disease (fin rot) which affected 2 out of my 3 peppered corydora which sadly both have now passed away so now I am only left with 1 cory in my 48litre aquarium. Was looking for advice on what to do next like is there a clean up process? I done a 10 litre water change yesterday Im going to do another tomorrow or Friday. I was wondering what else I should do? Im aware that peppered corydoras are sensitive to allot of the different treatments that can be used but I dont know what I can use or what I should do...help?

My water readings are currently at PH: 6.4 Ammonia: 0 Nitrite: 0 and Nitrate: 0 and my temperature is 24 degrees. Im waiting on a API hardness test kit being delivered so Im unable to provide those readings just now but will as soon as I receive it.

Also eventually once the aquarium is ready again I would like to add some more fish possibly more corys(would the age difference effect them getting along?) And/or some other fish...suggestions?

Thanks for taking the time to read this =)
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Old 05-01-2013, 01:11 PM   #2
 
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First, welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum.

To the issue. Are you certain it was fin rot? This is a new tank, and water instability can be hard on corys. Do you have live plants? What is the substrate?

The pH and temperature are fine (24 is obviously 24C, so that is about 75F which is ideal for corys). It will be good to know the GH when your test kit arrives, but with a pH of 6.4 I wold not expect trouble with GH.

Water changes are often the only "cure" needed. Half the tank volume, daily for a couple days will not hurt anything. I'm assuming your tap water and tank water parameters are the same.

How is the remaining cory behaving?

Byron.
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Old 05-01-2013, 02:40 PM   #3
 
The tank has been up and running for about 11ish months now. No live plants only silk. Substrate is just ur basic gravel nothing fancy.
The only difference in the water readings is the PH is 7.8 from the tap but 6.4 from tank.
The remaining cory was at fish appeared very jumpy any time I came close to the tank. She appears to be settling now doing her normal thing.
Dont know if its relavent but was 2 males well 2 smallest that died but the largest survived who I believe to be female. I do believe it was fin rot because of the red marks but I had thought it may have been swim bladder due to the leaning/falling to one side but no other signs or symptoms were showing, they stopped swimming more wriggled every now n then but I do think it was fin rot mainly because of the red spots as I dont know of any other disease that shows this sign?


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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
First, welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum.

To the issue. Are you certain it was fin rot? This is a new tank, and water instability can be hard on corys. Do you have live plants? What is the substrate?

The pH and temperature are fine (24 is obviously 24C, so that is about 75F which is ideal for corys). It will be good to know the GH when your test kit arrives, but with a pH of 6.4 I wold not expect trouble with GH.

Water changes are often the only "cure" needed. Half the tank volume, daily for a couple days will not hurt anything. I'm assuming your tap water and tank water parameters are the same.

How is the remaining cory behaving?

Byron.
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Old 05-01-2013, 03:25 PM   #4
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubbles87 View Post
The tank has been up and running for about 11ish months now. No live plants only silk. Substrate is just ur basic gravel nothing fancy.
The only difference in the water readings is the PH is 7.8 from the tap but 6.4 from tank.
The remaining cory was at fish appeared very jumpy any time I came close to the tank. She appears to be settling now doing her normal thing.
Dont know if its relavent but was 2 males well 2 smallest that died but the largest survived who I believe to be female. I do believe it was fin rot because of the red marks but I had thought it may have been swim bladder due to the leaning/falling to one side but no other signs or symptoms were showing, they stopped swimming more wriggled every now n then but I do think it was fin rot mainly because of the red spots as I dont know of any other disease that shows this sign?



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Red spots...or streaks? And were these on the fin (and which fin), or the body?
This may or may not be fin rot; here is a description that is fairly accurate:
In the early stages of Fin Rot the edges of the fins will discolor, appearing milky colored on the edges. Often this change is so subtle that it goes unnoticed until fraying of the fins or tail begins. As the infection spreads, small pieces of the fins die and begin to fall off, leaving a ragged edge. Over time the fins become shorter and shorter as dead flesh continues to slough off the affected fins. The affected area may become red and inflamed; with bloody patches appearing as more tissue is eaten away. It is common for secondary fungal infections to develop along the raw edges of the fins. It is not unusual for Columnaris (cotton-wool) to also be present at the same time as Fin Rot, as both occur from environmental factors.
Are there other fish in this tank? How long have you had the corys?

Diagnosing fish disease is very, very difficult. If one has experienced a specific disease and thus knows the signs, it is easier. I have very limited experience with disease (fortunately) but making sure we are dealing with the correct disease is paramount to anyone helping you, thus my questions.

Byron.
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Old 05-02-2013, 02:15 AM   #5
 
Erm I would say the first one was defo a spot on the pectoral fin but the 2nd one I would ssy steaks on the pectoral fin and his underneith? Although after he passed away when I took him out there was no longer any marks on his underneither only his fins.

I only kept peppered corydora and only have 1 now which I think is roughly 6/7months. My plan was if I managed ok with this aquarium I would get a larger aquarium and use this one either as a "hospital" tank or for a betta but looks like Im not doing so well...

I dont mind being asked questions because then I know you have the full information to possibly help and guide me in the right direction.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Red spots...or streaks? And were these on the fin (and which fin), or the body?
This may or may not be fin rot; here is a description that is fairly accurate:
In the early stages of Fin Rot the edges of the fins will discolor, appearing milky colored on the edges. Often this change is so subtle that it goes unnoticed until fraying of the fins or tail begins. As the infection spreads, small pieces of the fins die and begin to fall off, leaving a ragged edge. Over time the fins become shorter and shorter as dead flesh continues to slough off the affected fins. The affected area may become red and inflamed; with bloody patches appearing as more tissue is eaten away. It is common for secondary fungal infections to develop along the raw edges of the fins. It is not unusual for Columnaris (cotton-wool) to also be present at the same time as Fin Rot, as both occur from environmental factors.
Are there other fish in this tank? How long have you had the corys?

Diagnosing fish disease is very, very difficult. If one has experienced a specific disease and thus knows the signs, it is easier. I have very limited experience with disease (fortunately) but making sure we are dealing with the correct disease is paramount to anyone helping you, thus my questions.

Byron.
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Old 05-02-2013, 10:48 AM   #6
 
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Let's see if I am understanding things correctly. This aquarium has been running for almost a year, and you only had a group of corys and you had these for 6 or 7 months minimum before this "problem" occurred and fish died.

Unless something else was recently added to the tank, say plants, wood, rock, etc that came out of a store tank with fish, it is unlikely something got in to the tank. Which brings us to water conditions.

As mentioned in that bit I cited previously, environmental issues are almost always the cause of the diseases we are considering here. And the drop from 7.8 to 6.4 for pH is suggestive now that we know more. So more questions.

How frequent are water changes being done? And what volume of the tank is being changed each time? Do you vacuum into the gravel during these?

Do you know your nitrates?

What are you feeding, and how much/often?

Byron.
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Old 05-03-2013, 02:54 AM   #7
 
I change 10litres a week, I vaccum the gravel everytime. I feed tropical fish flakes and every now and then some bloodworm, when I had the 3 corys I gave between 2 or 3 flakes depending on the size of the flake every 2nd day. To my knowledge Im not doing anything wrong thats whats confusing me the most.
Just thought I changed half the foams in the filters like a week or so ago before the fish took unwell...could that have done anything?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Let's see if I am understanding things correctly. This aquarium has been running for almost a year, and you only had a group of corys and you had these for 6 or 7 months minimum before this "problem" occurred and fish died.

Unless something else was recently added to the tank, say plants, wood, rock, etc that came out of a store tank with fish, it is unlikely something got in to the tank. Which brings us to water conditions.

As mentioned in that bit I cited previously, environmental issues are almost always the cause of the diseases we are considering here. And the drop from 7.8 to 6.4 for pH is suggestive now that we know more. So more questions.

How frequent are water changes being done? And what volume of the tank is being changed each time? Do you vacuum into the gravel during these?

Do you know your nitrates?

What are you feeding, and how much/often?

Byron.
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Old 05-03-2013, 09:31 AM   #8
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubbles87 View Post
I change 10litres a week, I vaccum the gravel everytime. I feed tropical fish flakes and every now and then some bloodworm, when I had the 3 corys I gave between 2 or 3 flakes depending on the size of the flake every 2nd day. To my knowledge Im not doing anything wrong thats whats confusing me the most.
Just thought I changed half the foams in the filters like a week or so ago before the fish took unwell...could that have done anything?


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Possibly. This would obviously remove some of the nitrifying bacteria, but after almost a year I would expect this bacteria to be living everywhere in the tank, so simply changing the filter--and only half at that--should not normally have any detrimental effect.

On the foods, flake foods are almost useless with corys. I have seen some corys that will feed "upside down" at the surface, but this is rare. And if the flakes fall to the bottom, not all corys will eat them. They are better with sinking foods like pellets, tabs, disks. The bloodworms are fine, but only as a treat; once, at most twice a week, as these are very high in fat and actually contain little nutrition. Good sinking foods are shrimp pellets, Nutrafin tablets, and Omega One veggie rounds.

You could increase the volume of water changed every week. Though with only 3 corys in a 48 liter (12 gallon) tank a 1/4 water change is not bad. Some floating plants would help too, both for water quality and providing shade which calms fish.

The lowering of the pH is still something to investigate. Can you test for nitrates? And do you know the GH and KH of your tap water? GH is general hardness, and KH is carbonate hardness or sometimes called Alkalinity. You can get these numbers from your municipal water supply people, who probably have a website. The pH is connected so it is wise to know these numbers.

Byron.
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Old 05-04-2013, 03:09 AM   #9
 
I use to feed pellets at the beginning but I felt it was starting to give me algae problems. I will have a look and see what the shops have vailble to feed.
Do you mean live plants? And floating as in at the top?
Im not sure if this is what hour looking for but my area has soft water the turbity, aluminium, iron, manganese & e-coli results are 0 the Trihalomethanes 1 result failed. I will have another look for water results later as I get a feeling thats not what you were looking for lol.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Possibly. This would obviously remove some of the nitrifying bacteria, but after almost a year I would expect this bacteria to be living everywhere in the tank, so simply changing the filter--and only half at that--should not normally have any detrimental effect.

On the foods, flake foods are almost useless with corys. I have seen some corys that will feed "upside down" at the surface, but this is rare. And if the flakes fall to the bottom, not all corys will eat them. They are better with sinking foods like pellets, tabs, disks. The bloodworms are fine, but only as a treat; once, at most twice a week, as these are very high in fat and actually contain little nutrition. Good sinking foods are shrimp pellets, Nutrafin tablets, and Omega One veggie rounds.

You could increase the volume of water changed every week. Though with only 3 corys in a 48 liter (12 gallon) tank a 1/4 water change is not bad. Some floating plants would help too, both for water quality and providing shade which calms fish.

The lowering of the pH is still something to investigate. Can you test for nitrates? And do you know the GH and KH of your tap water? GH is general hardness, and KH is carbonate hardness or sometimes called Alkalinity. You can get these numbers from your municipal water supply people, who probably have a website. The pH is connected so it is wise to know these numbers.

Byron.
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Old 05-04-2013, 11:34 AM   #10
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubbles87 View Post
I use to feed pellets at the beginning but I felt it was starting to give me algae problems. I will have a look and see what the shops have vailble to feed.
Do you mean live plants? And floating as in at the top?
Im not sure if this is what hour looking for but my area has soft water the turbity, aluminium, iron, manganese & e-coli results are 0 the Trihalomethanes 1 result failed. I will have another look for water results later as I get a feeling thats not what you were looking for lol.


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You really need the sinking foods for corys and similar substrate feeders. These willnot cause algae any more than other foods.

Yes, floating plants are those floating on the surface. We have several species in our profiles, check under the Floating Plants section, under the second heading from the left in the blue bar at the top of this page.

If you can find data on your water, post the link and I can take a look.
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