What Corires Should I Get? - Page 3 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #21 of 35 Old 08-25-2009, 05:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Rohland View Post
Before when I had my ph test kit, my water would always be at 7.0
I believe this is fine for the cory catfish. I am not sure on the plants.
What test kit should i get, I heard the API is the best and I think i may be able to get the big test kit.

do i need to mess around with this dolomite stuff? where can i find it?
My tap water is usually 6.8, sometimes 7.0, and has been consistent lately. When a new tank is set up, the pH will be the same for a few weeks, then gradually begin to lower as I explained. How long it takes to reach this stage depends upon the size, bioload, plants, and of course any influencing substance in the tank (like limestone rock that will slightly raise GH and pH). The corys will be fine, and the plants, but the pH will drop in time.

More frequent (every day) partial water changes with tap water at pH 7 would obviously counter this, but that is a lot of fuss and bother when a teaspon of dolomite (for your 10g tank) will do the job for months. I'll explain this and show you tomorrow when you come by for the plants. Dolomite is just a calcium-base gravel that is often used as or mixed with the substrate in marine tanks and sometimes rift lake cichlid tanks where high pH and hardness are mandatory. I tend to replace the dolomite in the filters every year.

The API test kits have a good reputation on here, and I use them and have for 12 years. I've also got the Tetra pH kit, and I've seen (but never used0 Nutrafin's test kits.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #22 of 35 Old 08-25-2009, 06:27 PM Thread Starter
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okay well I will see you tomorrow.
I am officially broke.
I bought a new hood because mine broke x.x
and I needed one with flourescent lights.
Bough a life-glo light bulb
api test kit
seachem stability
seachem flourish..
$140 and i am broke...

I am excited for the fish, I just need to work on bringing the aquarium temperature down. Its running at about 78 and i would prefer 74.
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post #23 of 35 Old 08-26-2009, 01:35 AM Thread Starter
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also i made a boo boo a little while ago and wasnt paying attention when i bought my heater.
It is made for a 20 gal and my tank is 10 gal. So its on the lowest setting and my tank still runs at 77 degrees.
Is this too hot for the cories? I read anywhere from 72 - 80, but i have also heard that having a tank at a higher temperature reduces their life.
I could always go buy the proper heater but i just spent money on a new one.
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post #24 of 35 Old 08-26-2009, 01:47 AM Thread Starter
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i am going to see what temperature my tank maintains without a heater.
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post #25 of 35 Old 08-26-2009, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Rohland View Post
i am going to see what temperature my tank maintains without a heater.
Responding to your last two posts on the heater and heat.

Re the heater, most aquarists recommend a heater that is specified for a larger tank than the one you intend it for; the reason is that the larger the heater the less chance of it malfunctioning. I have myself had 2 or 3 50w heaters malfunction, but never a 150 or 200w. You don't say the wattage of your heater, but if it is intended for a 20g it should be fine for the 10g. Of course, it may not be working properly--what make is it? Some are more reliable than others. It sounds like one Ai have, on the lowest setting (which is marked 67F) it heats the tank consistently to 78F. I have it on my spare (no fish, just the plants) and it is consistent, but I don't trust it with a tank of fish.

On the room temperature, this works if your room can remain at the temp you want the tank, say 74F. No problem in the summer--although yesterday it would have been cooler. And in the winter you'd need to heat that room constantly. Fluctuating temperatures are stressful on fish and will lead to outbreaks of ich and other parasites. A diurnal fluctuation is OK because the fish are designed for it, but this varies by only a few degrees, say 71 at night and 74 in the day; most streams in Amazonas fluctuate by 1 or maybe 2 degrees celcius each day/night, but that's it for the entire year. I wouldn't risk the health of my fish going without a heater, not in our climate.

If you had a fishroom, with many tanks, it might pay to heat the room. Rhonda Wilson, who authors the monthly plant column in TFH, does this. But it means keeping the room at 78F which I personally would find warm and uncomfortable. Of course, she lives in a warmer climate so this is easier.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #26 of 35 Old 08-26-2009, 10:56 AM Thread Starter
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I don't think my parents would be impressed with the heating bill and you are right it would be really uncomfortable.
I think I could leave it around 77 degrees safely.
It is a 100w Top Fin Submersable heater.
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post #27 of 35 Old 08-26-2009, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Rohland View Post
I don't think my parents would be impressed with the heating bill and you are right it would be really uncomfortable.
I think I could leave it around 77 degrees safely.
It is a 100w Top Fin Submersable heater.
77F is fine for your corys. Keep an eye on it to ensure it doesn't go higher all of a sudden. I assume you have a thermometer in the tank--the digital stick-ons I like but they are inaccurate (all of them, I have 2 or 3 on every tank and they all read different) so I have the floating tube ones on two tanks, and one of the heaters on my 115 is a new Fluval model that displays the actual water temperature which is handy, and the 90g has an Eheim filter with built-in heating unit and a digital display of the water temperature in the aquarium that is accurate to a tenth of one degree. I've had this unit operating continuously for 12 years and never an issue with the filter or heating unit.

I'm not familiar with the Top Fin heaters. However, mention this when you come for the plants this afternoon as I do have some info to share.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #28 of 35 Old 08-26-2009, 11:26 AM Thread Starter
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Okay, I have been adding a lot of seachem cycle into the tank yesterday and today.(2 capfuls each day)
Also I added my three left over fish I had ( 2 zebra danios and 1 red skirt tetra)
They are doing fine except a little skittish because right now my tank doesnt have a back, and no decorations or plants. I also tested the water.

I think my ph may be a little high
Ph - 7.2-7.4
NH3/NH4+ - 0-0.25
NO2 - 0
NO3 - 0
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post #29 of 35 Old 08-26-2009, 11:28 AM Thread Starter
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Also my thermometers are the tube ones that either float in your tank or stick to the wall with a suction cup.
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post #30 of 35 Old 08-26-2009, 12:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rohland View Post
Okay, I have been adding a lot of seachem cycle into the tank yesterday and today.(2 capfuls each day)
Also I added my three left over fish I had ( 2 zebra danios and 1 red skirt tetra)
They are doing fine except a little skittish because right now my tank doesnt have a back, and no decorations or plants. I also tested the water.

I think my ph may be a little high
Ph - 7.2-7.4
NH3/NH4+ - 0-0.25
NO2 - 0
NO3 - 0
If the pH is the same as current tap water you used, that's normal. It will in time drop. Everything looks good to me, I wouldn't expect any issues. B.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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