Warm water cory?
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Warm water cory?

This is a discussion on Warm water cory? within the Catfish forums, part of the Freshwater and Tropical Fish category; --> Can i have a list of the corydoras besides sterbai that like warmer water about 80 Degrees? I have a 20 gallon and stocking ...

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Old 11-16-2009, 07:14 PM   #1
 
Warm water cory?

Can i have a list of the corydoras besides sterbai that like warmer water about 80 Degrees?

I have a 20 gallon and stocking it would look something like this:

2 Blue Rams
6 Cardinals
3 Otocinclus
3-5 Type of cory
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Old 11-17-2009, 07:57 AM   #2
 
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None of them "like" warm water, but some are able to tolerate it better than others. Sterbai are one, oiapoquensis (aka flag-tailed panda) may be another, but likely harder to find. I have had sterbai, and they are nifty cories.
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Old 11-17-2009, 05:52 PM   #3
 
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I knew there were not many, but when I did a search on Planet Catfish to find them only three species (including C. sterbai) appeared. Corydoras amapaensis and C. oiapoquensis (Mikey's suggestion) are the other two. There is also Brochis splendens. All these have an upper temperature limit of 28C (82F).

Byron.

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Old 11-17-2009, 06:18 PM   #4
 
I dont recall any probelm keeping common and some rare corys at 78-80F for long time?
Do you have any particular ones in mind?

You could just avoid one which requires lower optimal temp.

Unless these are avail today which does prefer lower temp but I dont know how easy it is to obtain such.
The following are the one I know which prefers lower temp.
atropersonatus, caudimaculatus, davidsandsi, delphax, ehrhardti, guapore, macropterus, melanotaenia, septentrionalis, etc.

Cory such as C. haraldschultzi, adolfoi, barbatus, trilineatus, julii, agassizi, melini, metae, rabauti, natteri, melanististius, reticulatus, swartzi, reticulatus, sterbai, steindachneri, , robinae, etc, I did not have any issues at 80F.

It's not just what temp or species but also how well you maintain the water quality plus how well you acclimate newly arrived corys, especially wild specimen.

Good Luck!

Last edited by cerianthus; 11-17-2009 at 06:20 PM..
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Old 11-18-2009, 07:25 PM   #5
 
Thanks. I am keeping my water temp at 80 degrees. I am probably going with sterbai cories. Would this be suitable for them for a long healthy life?
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Old 11-18-2009, 07:42 PM   #6
 
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Originally Posted by x2fast4everyone View Post
Thanks. I am keeping my water temp at 80 degrees. I am probably going with sterbai cories. Would this be suitable for them for a long healthy life?
I should think so. You mentioned blue rams earlier; they are fussy over water parameters, not only warm (80F is the minimum temp for them) but hardness and pH are critical. In water that is not very soft and slightly acidic they usually do not last long. I don't know what your water is like, or if this problem is worked out, so just a heads up.

Byron.
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Old 11-18-2009, 11:26 PM   #7
 
Well they were bred, and raised in a higher ph of 7.6. I keep the water at 80-82 degrees and my ph is 7.5 hardness is around 90 which is inbetween hard and soft. They already have spawned once, so I am thinking that could mean they are happy in this water?
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Old 11-19-2009, 01:32 PM   #8
 
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Originally Posted by x2fast4everyone View Post
Well they were bred, and raised in a higher ph of 7.6. I keep the water at 80-82 degrees and my ph is 7.5 hardness is around 90 which is inbetween hard and soft. They already have spawned once, so I am thinking that could mean they are happy in this water?
Hard to say. Other members here have reported losing this fish after a few months, and most of us believe this is solely due to the water parameters.

Most of the common or blue rams now available in stores are commercially tank-raised, and some believe that such fish tend to adapt to different water parameters from what they would have in their habitat. I think there is a limit to this "adaptation" in any fish, with very few exceptions, and some fish do not seem to adapt at all. Mikrogeophagus ramirezi is one such fish.

In their native habitat they live in water with a pH below 5.5 (none have to my knowledge been found in water higher than this) and a hardness of zero GH and KH. You can't get any softer water. And of course there is the temperature which should be 82-86F. This fish is also highly susceptible to health problems from chemicals and water quality, in addition to the parameters. A very sensitive species.

Why some fish do not adapt and others do is still something of a scientific mystery, according to Dr. Chris Andrews, the Director of the Steinhart Aquarium in San Francisco. The effect of adverse water parameters seems to be internal damage to organs and the immune system, perhaps caused by the stress of having to work harder internally to "live" in water that is outside the parameters for which the fish has evolved. There is a complex internal metabolism that feeds the fish's tissues, maintains the pH of its blood equal to the environment, and keeps the immune system functioning.

Cardinal tetras also have similar water parameter needs, and while they seem to be somewhat more adaptable, it is a scientific fact that when maintained in harder water they can develop issues like calcium blockage of the kidney tubes. The fact that this fish frequently lives only a few years, if that, in aquaria with basic (alkaline) water suggests that internal damage caused by the adverse water parameters is to blame. Dr. Jacques Gery, who probably knew more about characins than anyone else, wrote that he had cardinals that lived for more than 10 years in aquaria with soft acidic water. This problem may well occur with many of the soft acidic water fish.

Byron.
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Old 11-19-2009, 03:49 PM   #9
 
alright well is there any safe way of obtaining soft acidic water? my tap has a high ph and hard water. ive tried distilled water and that killed all of my fish.
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Old 11-19-2009, 05:50 PM   #10
 
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Yes, three possibilities. It is usually suggested that one choose fish to suit the water, since adjusting water parameters can be difficult, costly or quite an effort, or any combination. But if the tank is not too large, there are these methods.

1. Rainwater. It is always soft and acidic. The danger is what it may contain from industry in the area, or how you collect it (runoff from the roof is not good, better to simply have an open barrel in the yard). Some well water is soft, some very hard, should you have a well, worth checking.

2. Peat. Placing a quantity of peat in the filter will acidify and soften water as the tannins leech out. It has to be replaced as it gives out, and the rate depends upon the peat and how hard the water is to begin with. FishinPole used this method for a time, you might want to PM him for more info on how. I believe he got tired of collecting peat and changed methods. One drawback is the tannin colours the water. Bogwood does this too, but only temporarily. Peat filtration would be permanent.

3. RO (Reverse Osmosis) unit. Expensive to buy at the outset, but a ready source of pure water. It has to be mixed with regular tap water so there is some mineral in the water; pure water is devoid of anything and cannot support aquatic life. Some members here have experience with this.

I am fortunate to have soft acidic water come out of my tap. Hardness zero, pH 6.8 which in the aquarium quickly drops (due to no KH to buffer) and I buffer it with dolomite to keep it at 6.

Byron.
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