Help us out here plz?
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Help us out here plz?

This is a discussion on Help us out here plz? within the Catfish forums, part of the Freshwater and Tropical Fish category; --> I just came across a species of catfish. Called Otocinclus's, (im new to fish owning) and was wondering whether, in a 10 gallon along ...

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Help us out here plz?
Old 03-26-2008, 03:03 AM   #1
 
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Help us out here plz?

I just came across a species of catfish. Called Otocinclus's, (im new to fish owning) and was wondering whether, in a 10 gallon along with a betta, are these suitable to put in my tank?
If so, how many would be good without crowding the tank. I want both species of fish to have plenty of space

Thanks! :)
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Old 03-26-2008, 03:09 AM   #2
 
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Re: Help us out here plz?

Quote:
Originally Posted by kritas
I just came across a species of catfish. Called Otocinclus's, (im new to fish owning) and was wondering whether, in a 10 gallon along with a betta, are these suitable to put in my tank?
If so, how many would be good without crowding the tank. I want both species of fish to have plenty of space

Thanks! :)
kritis,
Yes, the Otocinclus will be OK in the 10, but not alone. They are best kept in groups of six or more. If you wish I can reproduce something I wrote some time ago about the care and feeding of Otocinclus here in this thread.

Dave
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Old 03-26-2008, 03:37 AM   #3
 
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6 or more you say. OK i will take that into consideration. Would be much appreciated for any extra information.
THANKS
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Old 03-26-2008, 05:10 AM   #4
 
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If you actually put 6 otos in a 10 with a betta, you will be stcked to the limit. otos are small fish but not small enough to not present a bioload. Although they are not very playful in small numbers, they can thrive that way. I have 2 in my 10 with a betta and a couple of platies. This means I am also stocked to the max but everyone is healthy and happy in there.
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Old 03-26-2008, 08:49 AM   #5
 
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also Oto's need alot of algea and if there's no algea present they need fresh vegitables (softened by either long soak or heating it up in water) such as Zucini (pardon spelling)
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Old 03-26-2008, 05:02 PM   #6
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kritas
6 or more you say. OK i will take that into consideration. Would be much appreciated for any extra information.
THANKS
Kritis,
Here's something I wrote some time ago on care and feeding of Otocinclus.

Dave


"One of the most misunderstood fish available are those of the Genus Otocinclus. They are usually kept wrongly or fed wrongly, or both. As I've seen a need on AC for a quick refresher course on how to keep them, I decided to do this post as a how-to.
Keep in mind this feeding program works with many primarily herbivorous Loricariads, including all the Bristlenose cats, as well as fish from other families, like Mollies, who must have real algae in their diets to truly thrive and have larger, more numerous and healthier fry.
First and foremost, either take them back unopened or throw them away, those so-called 'alga wafers' are one of the main causes of disease and early death of Otocinclus. There is no algae in the wafers, as Spirulina is a cyanobacteria.
Though some Otocinclus will eat them, or at least try to, when they are starving, it is exactly the same as feeding a human being only potato chips. Though they would survive for a time, the person and the fish would both die early from disease caused by malnutrition.
There is nothing wrong with using 'algae' wafers as a small part of the Otocinclus diet as variation is important for these fish for complete nutrition, as it is for all fish, and people for that matter.
The Number One most important food for Otocinclus is good, fresh, green algae. Culturing it is ridiculously simple (sunlight, water, rounded stones, ammonia source) but absolutely essential if you want to keep Otocinclus or any of their closerelatives alive and thriving long term. Green algae is their staple food.
Simply place the algae-covered stones on the gravel around the corners of the tank just before or just after lights out. They should be polished smooth by the Otocinclus within 24 hours, when the stones should be replaced.
Other foods that should be provided for your Otocinclus on a daily basis are fresh vegetables. Leafy vegetables should be pounded until a good bit of the plant flesh is visible. The big three of leafy vegetables are Romaine lettuce, Leaf Spinach and Kale. Never, ever use Iceberg lettuce, as it has no nutrition for people, much less fish.
Leafy vegetables should be attached to the side of the tank the Otocinclus frequent with commonly available aquarium clips designed to hold marine Macroalgae and the like.
Harder vegetables should be blanched (dunked in boiling water for a few minutes until moderately soft) until al dente. The big two are Zucchini and Cucumber, though there are many that are suitable for Otocinclus. You can try carrots, oranges, butternut squash, apples, pears, peaches; literally any harder vegetables will work, as long as they aren't toxic or otherwise unpalatable. In other words, if you can eat it, the Otocinclus probably can as well. You'll have to blanch the carrots and squash, but the others can be served raw. Peel and core apples, remove the pit and matter around it in peaches. Peel and remove as much of the covering on oranges as you can. Just slice the hard vegetables in halves. Most will need to be sunk. Use a clean teaspoon or similar to submerge the hard veggies.
As with all vegetables and green algae, if you place them in the same areas nightly, the Otocinclus will quickly learn where to go for dinner. Vegetables should be left in the tank 24 hours, promptly removing any that remains.
Any vegetable should be thoroughly washed under the faucet before use. If you have an organic grocery nearby, though the vegetables may be somewhat more expensive, they are better for you and the fish.

Otocinclus come from the vast floating meadows in the Amazon system. They and dazzling numbers of shrimp feed on the algae that covers the underside of those meadows.
Thus, to keep them properly, one is obligated to keep them in a well-planted, established, aquarium. As most plants do best between pH 6.8 and 7.2 in moderately soft water, planted tanks are ideal for Otocinclus, as they enjoy the same water parameters that the plants do. The major plus of keeping a troupe of Otocinclus in your planted tank you'll have no problems with algae popping up on your plants and decor. The Otocinclus will eat the algae when its still soft, preventing an outbreak.
Otocinclus should be kept in groups of at least six, though the more you have, the better they will all do.
There are several species of Otocinclus available, with O. affinis the most common. All, along with their close relatives Paratocinclus, can be kept basically the same way."
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Old 03-30-2008, 01:51 AM   #7
 
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With otos, how often do you feed them? Aren't you generally supposed to let them enjoy their algae and feed them like once-twice every first second day.
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Old 03-30-2008, 02:05 AM   #8
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kritas
With otos, how often do you feed them? Aren't you generally supposed to let them enjoy their algae and feed them like once-twice every first second day.
kritis,
Otocinclus are Herbivores, and it takes a lot of green foods to keep Herbivores going and healthy, so you'd feed them every day as above. As soon as they polish off algae they starve in a hurry, so you'd need to have the appropriate veggies in the tank.
I keep a dozen of their larger (3 inch) cousins Hypoptopoma gulare. They go through six to eight algae covered rocks (that I culture) and four or five Romaine or Spinach leaves every day. They really like fruit like peeled and cored apple, peaches, and Kiwi fruit as well.
That group of sucker-mouthed fish are approaching their seventh year in my care.
Like I said, Herbivores need a lot of food to get by.

Dave
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