"false" julii cories - info needed - Page 2
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"false" julii cories - info needed

This is a discussion on "false" julii cories - info needed within the Catfish forums, part of the Freshwater and Tropical Fish category; --> Thanks Gina! My cories are my favorite as well - and the new ones are just so adorable I can't stop staring at them!!! ...

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"false" julii cories - info needed
Old 09-08-2011, 07:25 AM   #11
 
Thanks Gina!

My cories are my favorite as well - and the new ones are just so adorable I can't stop staring at them!!! I have 2 tanks, and in the other one the cories were the first fish I ever got (aside from childhood goldfish won at the fair). I am very attached to them.

I have gravel substrate as well as a variety of live plants and several large rocks, and some "from the pet store" decor made to look like rock caves and hiding spots. One of my plants is a red lotus water lily that is growing very quickly - the cories seem to LOVE the base with the big bulb and the low dark leaves, and the top growing leaves shade the tank very nicely. Unfortunately I've heard that water lilies will quickly take over a 10 gallon tank, so I'll have to start trimming the floating leaves soon.
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Old 09-08-2011, 11:00 AM   #12
 
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On a side note.. is there a false peppered cory?
This question opens the door for me to rant about common names, so my apology in advance.

Common names are "common" only to those who use them with that fish in mind. Stores often make up a name to sell a fish. Sometimes a fish species will have a reasonably "common" common name attached to it, such as the neon tetra. Most aquarists would know which species this is from the common name. But even that is not always certain. The cardinal is called the red neon in Europe.

"False" this or that can be even more misleading. I have been forced into using common names for the fish species I add to the profiles here, because the system uses the common name to track them. I have made several up. For instance, I called Aspidoras pauciradiatus the "False Cory." No one in the world would have the slightest idea as to what fish a "False Cory" refers. But I couldn't think of another.

I called Corydoras duplicareus the "False Aldolfo Cory" and while that has merit--this species is scientifically C. duplicareus from the Latin meaning to duplicate, since it is almost identical in patterning to the true C. adolfoi--it is still not universally known or accepted; and it could just as easily be used with respect to C. imitator, which also copies the C. adolfoi pattern, as indeed does yet another species, C. serratus. C. imitator and C. serratus are extremely rare in the hobby, I wold venture to say no hobbyist has them; should the day ever come when I have to add either to the profile, I've no idea what name I will make up for it. Maybe "second false adolfo" and "third false adolfo" or something? And to add to the confusion, in stores you will almost always see C. duplicareus named "Adolfo's Cory" simply because it is now the more commonly-available cory with this pattern. But strictly speaking it is not Adolfo's cory.

Common names have absolutely no value with respect to identifying a species. The "C" numbers for new cory species and "L" numbers for new loricarid species that have not yet been described and thus named scientifically make much more sense.

Learning the scientific name is not that difficult; no more so than learning to speak in the first place, and most of us managed that. Scientific names are universal, understood by everyone everywhere, and specific to one species. I go into this more in my article on fish names if anyone is interested.

Byron.

Last edited by Byron; 09-08-2011 at 11:02 AM..
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Old 09-08-2011, 02:45 PM   #13
 
I understand your point Byron... but it's not exactly so. It's more like learning a second language if anything. Of course a chair will always be a chair. It wont happen that someone will take a look at it and say.. no this isn't a chair at all.. it's a desk. This happens often enough with scientific names.

Well you could break the term chair down into various other things.. stool, rocking chair, computer chair and so on. If someone says go sit on that chair, you understand. If someone said go sit on that caquetoire I bet you would wonder what they were talking about.

While Scientific names are defintely more accurate.. it doesn't help to be right if no one knows what you're talking about :)
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Old 09-08-2011, 02:46 PM   #14
 
and that is why the profiles try to have pictures :)
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Old 09-08-2011, 02:59 PM   #15
 
It's a tough balance. Common names would have more weight if more people were educated about the differences in species and consistently used them correctly. As stated, there are plenty of things that have common names that are used correctly nearly all the time because people know the differences. No one misuses the common name "human" because we all know what separates homo sapiens from any other species. I agree that pet stores make up names for fish, misname fish, and misidentify fish all the time. I was considering his while purchasing my corydoras trilineatus the other day. No one at the pet store seemed to have a clue that they were selling a fish as a one species when in fact it was another. I debated whether or not to tell them that. I decided that all I would accomplish would be ending up looking like a fish snob who was, in the end, still buying the misnamed "fake" fish. It's too bad that they do this, because it makes it so difficult to get good information on the fish you are buying. I'm lucky if they remember to put the common name sticker with a picture on ANY tank in the store, let alone the tank that species is actually in, let alone with the scientific name so I could actually identify the fish instead of taking their word for it. I frequently see my peppered cories referred to as "spotted" cories. Sometimes, "standard cories" which is just not even a thing.

Frustrating. I will try my best to learn scientific names. I am a smart girl, I know that I CAN learn them, it's just a question of motivation :)
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Old 09-08-2011, 03:04 PM   #16
 
and the biggest issue with common names is that there isn't a "correct" one. just common ones. and a name used in one area can be completely different than one used in another. this happens all the time in plants and the like too.
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Old 09-09-2011, 12:01 AM   #17
 
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I understand your point Byron... but it's not exactly so. It's more like learning a second language if anything. Of course a chair will always be a chair. It wont happen that someone will take a look at it and say.. no this isn't a chair at all.. it's a desk. This happens often enough with scientific names.
Don't grasp the last sentence here.

Quote:
Well you could break the term chair down into various other things.. stool, rocking chair, computer chair and so on. If someone says go sit on that chair, you understand. If someone said go sit on that caquetoire I bet you would wonder what they were talking about.
So this seems to be saying we should call all fish "fish" as the name? But this also demonstrates the restriction on common names to the language, and sometimes it is even more restricted to areas. On some sites you can ascertain the "common" names for a species and you will find many and varying names in different languages, and usually not just translations back and forth.

Quote:
While Scientific names are defintely more accurate.. it doesn't help to be right if no one knows what you're talking about :)
But the whole point is that with scientific names, everyone knows exactly what fish you are talking about. You cannot say that with common names. I've given examples already. Here's another. In one of my better local stores I spotted some dwarf banded loach. I had no idea what they were, so I asked the owner for the scientific name from the supplier's list. Went home and looked it up, Yunnanilus cruciatus, and discovered it was a superb loach for smallish tanks. Went back the next week and bought a group. I would never have done this had I not been able to find the scientific name, because that is the only way to ascertain the fish and its habits/behaviours/needs.

In another store, spotted a group of loaches in a tank and they had some common name like "Spotted loach" or something. Searched far and wide and couldn't find them, so I called the store and asked for the scientific name from the list. Got it and looked it up, they get 6+ inches, are aggressive to each other and everything else. Getting 5-6 of those would have been a nightmare in my tanks.
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