Corydoras & Substrate w/ Plants - Page 2
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Freshwater and Tropical Fish » Catfish » Corydoras & Substrate w/ Plants

Corydoras & Substrate w/ Plants

This is a discussion on Corydoras & Substrate w/ Plants within the Catfish forums, part of the Freshwater and Tropical Fish category; --> Originally Posted by Byron A larger tank would work better for neons, but a 10g can work when planted and with good maintenance, so ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Gosse Cory
Gosse Cory
False Network Catfish
False Network Catfish
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Corydoras & Substrate w/ Plants
Old 01-10-2013, 09:10 PM   #11
 
JulieJules's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
A larger tank would work better for neons, but a 10g can work when planted and with good maintenance, so let's work with that.

Shoaling fish must have groups; they are "programmed" by nature to live in large groups of their own species and there are several aspects of their behaviour that can be centered around this. Without getting into all that here, suffice it to say that they must have several in order to be healthy. The number varies a bit with species.

Most tetra need 6 minimum, but again the more there are the better for the fish. With neon tetra I wold say 7-8 for your 10g. Check their profile [click the shaded name] for more info.

The pygmy cory is not that easy a fish, but still worth considering. Here you want more than 6, no less than 8-9. Check their profile. One of the larger species is also possible, a group of 5 can work in a 10g for those that remain under 2 inches.

We haven't discussed water parameters, and this is important for these fish which are soft water fish. What is your tap water GH (hardness) and pH?

Byron.
Pygmy cories seem to a little more complicated than I'm brave enough to take on-- they're so adorable though! I'm just worried that they may die if I do one tiny misstep. I've read that panda cories can stay relatively small too; would this be an ok substitute?

I actually don't know what my water hardness/PH level is. I haven't bought a test kit, as I am still setting up the tank. I also have a large piece of mopani wood [I'm soaking it right now to release the excess tannins, though I know that tetras and cories enjoy them] and I read that the wood actually lowers the PH and softens the water.

Thanks for your help!
JulieJules is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 12:56 PM   #12
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JulieJules View Post
Pygmy cories seem to a little more complicated than I'm brave enough to take on-- they're so adorable though! I'm just worried that they may die if I do one tiny misstep. I've read that panda cories can stay relatively small too; would this be an ok substitute?

I actually don't know what my water hardness/PH level is. I haven't bought a test kit, as I am still setting up the tank. I also have a large piece of mopani wood [I'm soaking it right now to release the excess tannins, though I know that tetras and cories enjoy them] and I read that the wood actually lowers the PH and softens the water.

Thanks for your help!
Yes, panda corys tend to remain relatively small, and there are several similar species. Ironically, pandas are not that easy either, as it mentions in our profile, Corydoras panda.

You can ascertain the water GH and pH from your water supply folks, they probably have a website. If you can't make anything of their data, post the link and I will have a look. This is very important, as it is much easier, safer and more successful to select fish that manage in the source water than attempting to adjust the water chemistry to accommodate sensitive fish.

Wood does soften the water and simultaneously lower the pH but this is usually minimal. It all depends upon the initial GH and KH of the water, plus the amount of wood and the type of wood. And yes, tannins are harmless and actually beneficial, though most of us don't relish the stained water. But it is harmless.

When you come to a test kit, most of us here recommend the API liquid Master Combo. Test strips are less reliable, so a liquid test kit is better. And the API Master contains tests for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate which is all you need. The Combo will be less expensive than buying individual kits for these things.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 07:10 PM   #13
 
JulieJules's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Yes, panda corys tend to remain relatively small, and there are several similar species. Ironically, pandas are not that easy either, as it mentions in our profile, Corydoras panda.

You can ascertain the water GH and pH from your water supply folks, they probably have a website. If you can't make anything of their data, post the link and I will have a look. This is very important, as it is much easier, safer and more successful to select fish that manage in the source water than attempting to adjust the water chemistry to accommodate sensitive fish.

Wood does soften the water and simultaneously lower the pH but this is usually minimal. It all depends upon the initial GH and KH of the water, plus the amount of wood and the type of wood. And yes, tannins are harmless and actually beneficial, though most of us don't relish the stained water. But it is harmless.

When you come to a test kit, most of us here recommend the API liquid Master Combo. Test strips are less reliable, so a liquid test kit is better. And the API Master contains tests for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate which is all you need. The Combo will be less expensive than buying individual kits for these things.

Byron.
Ok, so I need to do some more research, but I found out that my city has pretty hard water:

"Typically, drinking water averages about 15.4 grains per gallon (gr/gal), or 263 parts per million (ppm); and, depending upon water demand and the area of the City you live, can range from 13.4 to 19.0 gr/gal, or 229 to 325 ppm."

But I also have a pretty strong filtration system in my house; I'll leave the link here. I don't know if it makes a difference or not, but the site claims that it softens water.

I'm trying to find the pH, but I might just have to test to see what the pH is of our running tap water.

Thanks!
JulieJules is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 08:38 PM   #14
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JulieJules View Post
Ok, so I need to do some more research, but I found out that my city has pretty hard water:

"Typically, drinking water averages about 15.4 grains per gallon (gr/gal), or 263 parts per million (ppm); and, depending upon water demand and the area of the City you live, can range from 13.4 to 19.0 gr/gal, or 229 to 325 ppm."

But I also have a pretty strong filtration system in my house; I'll leave the link here. I don't know if it makes a difference or not, but the site claims that it softens water.

I'm trying to find the pH, but I might just have to test to see what the pH is of our running tap water.

Thanks!
The link system seems pretty good. It would be worth it to have the water (after running through this) tested for GH. If you have a reliable fish store, they will often do tests for you. Just make sure to get the number, not "it's OK" or "hard" which tells us very little. Let the store test the pH too while they're at it. I wouldn't waste money on a GH test kit, you may only use it the once.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Best Plants for Sand and Corydoras? wavebeast Beginner Planted Aquarium 3 06-15-2012 12:35 PM
Corydoras substrate in 10 gallon Littlebittyfish Catfish 7 05-28-2011 03:24 PM
Corydoras & Substrate mischievouscat Catfish 14 05-16-2009 09:12 AM


Tags
aquarium, catfish corydoras, eco complete, plants, substrate

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:11 PM.