Corydoras julii questions - new setup, considering cories - Page 3 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #21 of 31 Old 03-25-2010, 10:51 AM
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I like others, and as you will too, have learned from experience and problems. I have set up new aquaria and added Corydoras pygmaeus or C. habrosus, two of the "dwarf" species and very sensitive, and lost all within a few weeks while other fish (tetras and pencilfish) survived; in the same aquarium, five months later, I added a group of 9 C. pygmaeus, they are still there doing fine; last December I found some C. habrosus and added 11, they are doing great. Having an established tank biologically is very important for Corydoras; they do not like fluctuating water parameters. Stability is the key to success with them.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #22 of 31 Old 03-25-2010, 11:28 AM
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Thanks Byron. You are more optimistic than I am I'll be glad when I'm actually able to make a decision and put it into practice. I keep reading more and more and getting more and more confused and uncertain. I go from having decided what to do to thinking it's all wrong and I'm headed for disaster I'll settle down when the tanks are cycled and the fish (hopefully) haven't all died on me.

I recall when I decided to try my hand at keeping Discus. I researched and researched all I could find on them and visited forums dedicated to these fish and very nearly convinced myself that they were just too sensitve and demanding for me to hope to be able to be successful.
I then decided that they were just fish, no more,no less. If I could maintain the tank with proper maint,and provide a stable enviornment, I should be able to be successful. I went ahead and purchased a small group and placed them in well established tank and with little more care than iIprovided my other fish. I saw to it that they received a proper diet,got regular water changes,and that the parameters in my tank remained stable. The fish did the rest.
I am with Byron,, Get the fish you want and take care of your water. Fish will be little trouble.

The most important medication in your fish medicine cabinet is.. Clean water.
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post #23 of 31 Old 03-25-2010, 10:09 PM Thread Starter
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You're both right of course. It just adds another consideration when the fish are more expensive. If they die, it isn't just the feeling of personal responsibility and failure (even if it's unwarranted), but also the loss of more money than if you bought cheap(er) fish.

Reading forums can give you a distorted view. People post when they've got problems. You don't get an indication of how many people are happily caring for the fish you want without any problems because they're not the ones who need to post.

(Those discus are lovely fish. I've seen them at the shop.)
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post #24 of 31 Old 04-22-2010, 01:24 PM
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I have another question about the cories. How hardy are the julii cories? The reason I ask is that they are a lot more expensive than the peppered and bronze. I'd like to be confident that they would survive (after the tank is stable, of course) before spending extra on them. If they are sensitive I'd rather pick something less sensitive. What do you think? What species should I get? Thanks.
I happened across this thread while working on adding/updating the fish profiles for C. julii and related species and thought I'd provide some comments in response to your question. I hadn't really caught this before, sorry.

Corydoras julii is extremely rare in the hobby. The cory most often offered as julii is actually Corydoras trilineatus which is wide-spread. You might want to check out our profiles [click on the shaded names] to see the differences. And you will note there that the true C. trilineatus is very hardy and an excellent beginner's fish. Given its very attractive patterning, I wouldn't pass it up if I were you; I have this species, it is in my view one of the nicest in the genus.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #25 of 31 Old 04-22-2010, 08:09 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks. Yes, I'd read about the differences between julii and trilineatus. I'm not sure what they are, but they are calling them julii.

The fish shop is actually getting some in today. I'm very tempted, but a bit worried that my tank isn't established enough. The 35-litre has finished cycling, the 75-litre is in the nitrite stage, but should be getting near to the end if it goes similarly to the other one. What do you think? Could I get some to put in my smaller tank, either permanently or temporarily until the bigger one has finished cycling? They don't get them in very often....

Even if I don't get them, I'm definitely going down to the shop to have a look at them. I should then know if they really are julii or not.
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post #26 of 31 Old 04-22-2010, 08:19 PM
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Thanks. Yes, I'd read about the differences between julii and trilineatus. I'm not sure what they are, but they are calling them julii.

The fish shop is actually getting some in today. I'm very tempted, but a bit worried that my tank isn't established enough. The 35-litre has finished cycling, the 75-litre is in the nitrite stage, but should be getting near to the end if it goes similarly to the other one. What do you think? Could I get some to put in my smaller tank, either permanently or temporarily until the bigger one has finished cycling? They don't get them in very often....

Even if I don't get them, I'm definitely going down to the shop to have a look at them. I should then know if they really are julii or not.
Take a copy of our photos, or jot down the differences to look for. I'd be quite surprised if they are julii; if they are they will be wild-caught (unless someone locally breeds them as does happen) and thus more sensitive to water parameters and conditions. But if they are trilineatus, they would be fine in your cycled tank and could be moved in to the other when it is cycled. I would never use corys to cycle a tank without plants, they are highly sensitive to ammonia. All of my tanks are planted, so when I set them up with plants I never have to worry about cycling, and while I would never introduce the more delicate species into such a new setup, I have introduced others like C. trilineatus with no losses or problems I could detect.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #27 of 31 Old 04-22-2010, 09:11 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks. I'm looking forward to seeing them "in person". They are the ones I wanted first off, but I'd given up thinking I'd get them because the guy in the shop said the price was too high for him to buy them, he'd only buy them at a reasonable price. I know from talking to him before that they are not locally bred, because he was telling me about the albino sterbai he had and they were locally bred, unlike the others he had.

The other fish shop has panda cories which are just gorgeous too. I'd have liked those, but they don't look very healthy, I've read that they are more sensitive and I haven't seen them elsewhere to get healthier ones. I want to get something that's less likely to die.
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post #28 of 31 Old 04-23-2010, 12:24 PM
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Pandas can be difficult. They are not a species for new tanks, and they do not accept fluctuating water conditions. I now have a trio in my 90g that I've had for over a year, the longest ever, but that tanks is as stable as a rock water-wise. Even so, these little guys came down with columnaris several months after I'd had them and I had to treat them, fortunately they survived though they were clearly stressed out with the medication. But they are now a bundle of energy, the three of them almost always together, chasing around, nudging each other, a real Three Stooges of fish.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #29 of 31 Old 04-23-2010, 07:31 PM Thread Starter
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Yes, thanks. I'd read that about pandas. It's a shame you can't just pick out the fish that you like the look of, but I'm really trying to pick the hardiest fish I can get so definitely don't want something that's probably going to die on me.
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post #30 of 31 Old 04-23-2010, 10:31 PM
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Yes, thanks. I'd read that about pandas. It's a shame you can't just pick out the fish that you like the look of, but I'm really trying to pick the hardiest fish I can get so definitely don't want something that's probably going to die on me.
If you prepare their new home they won't die. If you want this or that species and it is sensitive, fine, set up the tank, have some of the other fish in it, and when it is established, add your particular cory.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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