Corydoras Eating habits... - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 01-06-2012, 01:09 PM Thread Starter
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Corydoras Eating habits...

I have 3 leopard corys, and until recently iv noticed that firstly, the smallest was eating bloodworm but spitting it back out through its gills, while the bigger 2 just yummed up as much as the could eat. secondly i decided its about time i feed them some catfish pellets instead of them eating left over fish flakes, the 2 biggest ones sort of had a sniff and turned away, where as the littlest tryed his hardest to much a pellet down.

Im now wondering if there is something wrong with them or if they are just being picky eaters?

the store i buy all my supplies and my fish from said it could be they dint like the food, or werent hungry.
however when reading about fish i see that fish will always eat if food is there.

can anyone enlighten me on if its a problem, or do my fish have indevidual tastes

Thanks :)
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post #2 of 8 Old 01-07-2012, 06:48 PM
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First on the bloodworm exiting via the gills, this is not unusual. Corydoras sift through the substrate continually (which is why sand is preferred) and they often pick it up looking for food tidbits, then expel the sand out the gills. I have known them to do this with worms too, live or frozen. So this is nothing to worry about.

As to food for corys. Variety is the spice of life. I feed a variety of four different foods to all my fish, and I have over 30 corys in my 115g so they get 4 types of sinking foods. Tablets, pellets or disks are fine, and at least one should be vegetarian-based, not because corys eat algae (they don't), but simply as a digestive/intestinal cleaning. One of the algae/spirulina/kelp sinking disk foods like Omega One and Hikari make is fine. Plus 2-3 other types. Shrimp pellets are relished by corys. Omega One makes a good shrimp pellet food. The Hikari sinking wafers are another good choice.

You'll note that I have mentioned Omega One and Hikari a lot; these two manufacturers produce high quality foods. Another is New Life Spectrum which many here recommend; I haven't tried it yet as no one near me carries it.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #3 of 8 Old 01-12-2012, 10:35 AM
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Like Byron said as far as the food exiting the gill, you have nothing to worry about it. If you notice when they eat some of the food passes thru the gills, but you will notice that they are still munching of the food. Technically if you think about it, if humans had holes(gills) in our throat, some things that we intake will exit as well.

When you first get your cories home from the store they may not eat right away. Why? The LFS or whom ever, more than likely fed the fish a different diet than what your are or what you intend. Give them some settle in time. They will eventually realize that what you drop in is food. Given that you give the species the proper food.

Don't go crazy with blood worms though. High protein diet can bloat them. Bloodworms should be used more as a treat, not a continuous food source.
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post #4 of 8 Old 01-31-2012, 01:05 PM
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Somewhat old thread (couple weeks) but I have a question that also relates to corys and eating.

I have four corys with 6 Serpae Tetras. The tetras go absolutely nuts during feeding. They remind me of sharks getting the scent of blood, or piranhas. They are from the same family as piranhas so maybe I shouldn't be suprised ;) Anyways, the tetras go nuts and eat everything they can find. I bought some Omega One shrimp pellets that are fairly small in size. I feed both a couple pellets (3) and a little flakes at the same time, twice daily. The tetras go nuts over the flakes, then they take up the pellets in their mouth and race off with them while others in the school give chase.

Basically ... I'm not sure how much food the corys are actually getting because of those pigs. Should I be worried? Should I put pellets in at night after lights out & early morning before the lights come on?
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post #5 of 8 Old 01-31-2012, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Geomancer View Post
Somewhat old thread (couple weeks) but I have a question that also relates to corys and eating.

I have four corys with 6 Serpae Tetras. The tetras go absolutely nuts during feeding. They remind me of sharks getting the scent of blood, or piranhas. They are from the same family as piranhas so maybe I shouldn't be suprised ;) Anyways, the tetras go nuts and eat everything they can find. I bought some Omega One shrimp pellets that are fairly small in size. I feed both a couple pellets (3) and a little flakes at the same time, twice daily. The tetras go nuts over the flakes, then they take up the pellets in their mouth and race off with them while others in the school give chase.

Basically ... I'm not sure how much food the corys are actually getting because of those pigs. Should I be worried? Should I put pellets in at night after lights out & early morning before the lights come on?
I have a similar issue in my 90g. The Congo Tetra grab the shrimp pellets. My other sinking foods (tablets, disks) they tend to let fall for the loaches and pleco. And feeding a variety of foods is wise, say 3-4 different types of sinking. For the shrimp pellets, those I feed a couple hours after darkness. I know the loaches sleep, so the pleco certainly finds some of these. But the Congo also sleep so they are not getting them. In our case the corys would find any food added after dark; they are semi-nocturnal plus they would find them at dawn.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #6 of 8 Old 02-04-2012, 10:53 PM
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I put the shrimp pellet and waffers, put it between a folded paper. Grab a small hammer, and hammer it gently until it's much smaller... smaller then a pellet size. Then put it in the tank.

As it goes down, my Tetras are stuffing themselves, but there's enough that goes down to the sand, and it's small enough that the Tetras are not eating it... and my Pandas start shifting through the sand all day eating.

I've been doing this for a couple of months now, and it's working out for everyone. :)
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post #7 of 8 Old 02-05-2012, 11:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BabyBoyBlue View Post
I put the shrimp pellet and waffers, put it between a folded paper. Grab a small hammer, and hammer it gently until it's much smaller... smaller then a pellet size. Then put it in the tank.

As it goes down, my Tetras are stuffing themselves, but there's enough that goes down to the sand, and it's small enough that the Tetras are not eating it... and my Pandas start shifting through the sand all day eating.

I've been doing this for a couple of months now, and it's working out for everyone. :)
Using the saqme principle, another good food is the small sinking foods that are already this mini-size. I feed some of these and put in maybe a half teaspoon and give it a quick stir, and most of them sink so fast the corys spend the next couple hours sifting them out as this member noted. Omega One make some of these.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #8 of 8 Old 02-12-2012, 09:05 PM
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If you're worried about your little one not being able to eat the shrimp pellets, break them in half. In my experience they sink much quicker and become softer faster.

You might want to try tubiflex worms as a treat. I put one block in after my weekly tank cleaning and my cories go bananas eating them. I'm watching them feast as we speak! Plus, the other fish like to eat any scraps that float away. This is only a once a week treat since the worms are so messy. I've begun feeding them algae wafers as well and they love those too.
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