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Cories for 15 gal?

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Old 07-05-2009, 05:10 AM   #11
 
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sweet. :)
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Old 07-05-2009, 05:48 AM   #12
 
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I'm planning to get C. paleatus (Peppered) or C. panda since these are the more common (and cheaper!) ones I can find.

Now, time to save up so I can buy the substrate and fish! Probably will have to wait 3 or 4 months more, though. :(
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Old 07-05-2009, 08:34 AM   #13
 
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Originally Posted by adiumroot View Post
I'm planning to get C. paleatus (Peppered) or C. panda since these are the more common (and cheaper!) ones I can find.

Now, time to save up so I can buy the substrate and fish! Probably will have to wait 3 or 4 months more, though. :(
A couple of comments on issues mentioned in several of the last few posts. First, your suggestion of neons and corys is fine, both prefer slightly cooler water, around 75 F (24 C), and near-identical water parameters and environment (plants). Livebearers are OK but have a bigger effect in a small tank like a 15g and as you know there will be fry continually if you have male & female. While a store may want them now, five months from now they may have had enough.

Hatchets and pencilfish are not always available, but they are suitable tankmates for corys as are any of the small shoaling tetras (all these except of course the corys are characins) and there are hundreds of species; unfortnately, at least where I live, stores generally carry the "common" varieties so one rarely has opportunity to acquire some of the more colourful and fascinating species. Similar fish are the many rasbora species from SE Asia, also small, quiet, colourful and identical water requirements.

One suggestion on corys, some species do not adjust well to new tanks, by which I mean tanks recently set up that have not yet matured biologically (after 3 months usually). And Corydoras panda is one of these. C. paleatus is not so sensitive, but will settle in better in a tank that has fully cycled (2 to 8 weeks). Most of the characins and rasbora will also fare better when introduced to a matured tank.

Your mention of C. panda and paleatus illustrates my comment on the unavailability of fish; these corys and a few others are quite readily available in stores because they are commercially bred in Florida and SE Asia. The species that are still wild caught are less often seen, and of course more expensive, so sometimes you have to look around or use mail order to get some of the rarer but very beautiful fish.
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Old 07-05-2009, 09:38 AM   #14
 
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So I might have to settle with an all-male livebearer set-up then. Thanks for the heads-up. I chose livebearers since I'm not that interested in small characins like tetras. However, that might change in the few months I'm gonna have to wait.

About the biological maturation issue, I have matured filters already sitting in my other set-ups. All I need to do is transfer the filter to the new tank, add the livebearers, and the corys go in about a week or two later. This is enough, right? I've done this multiple times and water quality didn't deteriorate. (no ammonia or nitrite spikes)

The more common and cheaper cories were chosen since I'm a newbie with cories and I'm bound to make mistakes. Worst case scenario, I don't want to compound my regret over losing my fish with the regret of having lost a lot of money. The former's bad enough. :(

Last edited by adiumroot; 07-05-2009 at 09:49 AM..
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Old 07-05-2009, 10:04 AM   #15
 
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Originally Posted by adiumroot View Post
So I might have to settle with an all-male livebearer set-up then. Thanks for the heads-up. I chose livebearers since I'm not that interested in small characins like tetras. However, that might change in the few months I'm gonna have to wait.

About the biological maturation issue, I have matured filters already sitting in my other set-ups. All I need to do is transfer the filter to the new tank, add the livebearers, and the corys go in about a week or two later. This is enough, right? I've done this multiple times and water quality didn't deteriorate.

The more common and cheaper cories were chosen since I'm a newbie with cories and I'm bound to make mistakes. Worst case scenario, I don't want to compound my regret over losing my fish with the regret of having lost a lot of money. The former's bad enough. :(
Assuming we're talking about a new tank: the cycling process takes anywhere from 2 to 8 weeks [there are some factors that affect this so it is impossible to accurately pin down]. Adding bacteria from an established tank through filter media, gravel, wood, rocks and plants, does help to establish the bacteria faster, but from the experiences of others this still takes more than a week or two. When the ammonia and nitrite read zero and the nitrates show a reading, and for several consecutive days, the tank may be considered cycled for the level of biological life in it. And of course, there has to be a consistent supply of ammonia throughout this period to ensure that the bacteria do not die off from lack of "food."

A biologically matured tank is a very different thing. Once a tank is initially cycled, it takes a few weeks for things to really settle down biologically. The fish in the tank (their size and levels of activity have an effect on the bioload), plants if any, temperature, pH and hardness values, all have a bearing. Most agree that once a tank has cycled and then been running with no issues for a couple of months, it is probably biologically mature--for what's in it at that time. It is then safer to add fish that are more sensitive to water quality and parameters, since the water conditions in the tank will be stable even though they may not be (and usually are not) identical to what the fish "prefers." If you don't want to stress out your fish and risk losing some of them, take the time. What we as aquarists perceive as water quality is not necessarily the same as the fish experiences it. The fish is closely tied to the water; it absorbs water through the cells by osmosis, and has to regulate its blood pH and several other internal processes to equal the pH, hardness, salinity and temp of the water. The more it has to work to regulate, the more it suffers stress. And any fluctuation in water conditions however slight has an effect on the fish's metabolism. Waiting the time ensures we are reducing that effect.

Re the corys, C. panda is for some reason quite a sensitive fish. Recent posts in other threads on this forum have made this observation, and it has certainly been my experience. I have lost more pandas than any other cory. Considering they are now commercially raised, one would think they would be more adaptable, but...nature has its own course and we can't always alter it. But they are amusing corys, and well worth taking the care to settle them in.

Last edited by Byron; 07-05-2009 at 10:06 AM..
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Old 07-05-2009, 11:40 AM   #16
 
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I see. I've read around and the opinion is almost universal: panda cories are really sensitive. So I guess I wont be getting them and if I do, I'll follow your advice and add them to the mature tank.

I'll be doing some more research during the waiting time. Come to think of it, I can set-up the tank now and add the livebearers. In a few months when I finally have the money for cories, the tank will most probably be mature by then.

Thanks a lot, Byron.

Last edited by adiumroot; 07-05-2009 at 11:44 AM..
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Old 07-05-2009, 12:46 PM   #17
 
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Originally Posted by adiumroot View Post
I see. I've read around and the opinion is almost universal: panda cories are really sensitive. So I guess I wont be getting them and if I do, I'll follow your advice and add them to the mature tank.

I'll be doing some more research during the waiting time. Come to think of it, I can set-up the tank now and add the livebearers. In a few months when I finally have the money for cories, the tank will most probably be mature by then.

Thanks a lot, Byron.
Right on, good thinking. Don't give up on the pandas; I've got three now that have been here since January, and they really are the most comical fellows. Once your tank is established, they'll be waiting for you.

Byron.
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Old 07-06-2009, 07:58 PM   #18
 
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Hmm,I didnt know that about pandas. I have 6,well 7 cause they spawned on me LOL. I have had most of them for well over 4 months now,newest ones maybe 3 months. No fatalies. But then I have found out that my tap water conditions are perfect for them,so maybe thats why they are doing well.

Yes they are very amusing lil fish!! I love watching them.
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Old 07-07-2009, 11:14 AM   #19
 
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I happened to pass by a pet shop today and saw some "Albino corydoras" for sale. However, when I asked, the attendant couldn't give the scientific name of said cories. What types of cory are usually bred as albinos? If it's any help, they sold it cheap. Around $1 converted from Philippine Peso.

I'm thinking of putting in all-male fancy guppies as the mid-water tankmates. The tank and filter is already set up, with a few mollies (they just keep on multiplying!) I took from my pond sitting in it to provide ammonia source. Hopefully by next week I can get to planting the tank. Target date of buying the cories is by late-September to early October.
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Old 07-07-2009, 12:26 PM   #20
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adiumroot View Post
I happened to pass by a pet shop today and saw some "Albino corydoras" for sale. However, when I asked, the attendant couldn't give the scientific name of said cories. What types of cory are usually bred as albinos? If it's any help, they sold it cheap. Around $1 converted from Philippine Peso.

I'm thinking of putting in all-male fancy guppies as the mid-water tankmates. The tank and filter is already set up, with a few mollies (they just keep on multiplying!) I took from my pond sitting in it to provide ammonia source. Hopefully by next week I can get to planting the tank. Target date of buying the cories is by late-September to early October.
The original albino cory was developed from the species Corydoras aeneus but I have seen other strains from time to time, like C. sterbai. If it is inexpensive it is probably C. aeneus.
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