Stocking my Brackish water tank!
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Stocking my Brackish water tank!

This is a discussion on Stocking my Brackish water tank! within the Brackish Water forums, part of the Freshwater and Tropical Fish category; --> Okay i have a cycled (for 3 months!) 46(23 cus its half way filled) Gallon tank. It is set up for mudskippers with places ...

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Stocking my Brackish water tank!
Old 03-02-2010, 08:13 PM   #1
 
Stocking my Brackish water tank!

Okay i have a cycled (for 3 months!) 46(23 cus its half way filled) Gallon tank.
It is set up for mudskippers with places to get out of the water and such.
I was wondering how the following stock would do.

Orange Chromide - 2 (4 until i get a pair)
Dwarf Indian Mudskippers - 3
and
Celebes Rainbow fish- 5-7

and maybe a few red nose shrimp.

the way it is set up is Rock work in the back center of the tank stacked about 4-5 inches out of the water with lots of ledges. Java moss covering most of the rock work underwater.
3 Red mangroves on both sides of the rockwork.
Tiger lotus infront of the mangroves and rockwork.(with some leave floating at the surface)
Drift wood in the right front corner coming out of the water.

And a turtle deck floating in the left front corner of the tank.

Anyway any suggestions on stock? Celebes rainbows even going to beable to fit? i figured they would since the mudskippers spend most the time out of the water.
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Old 03-03-2010, 03:33 PM   #2
 
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I think because you are only dealing with a total water volume of less than 20 gallons (keep in mind that decor and rock, substrate, etc. will displace some of the water volume), that stocking list sounds a bit much. I think I would pick either chromides or celebese rainbows to go with the skippers and call it full. I hope you are using a good filtration unit designed for saltwater and big enough to handle a heavy waste load.

The one big change I would make is the driftwood... I'd get that out of there asap. Driftwood does not mix with brackish or marine aquariums. Tannic acid that is found in driftwood is not a good mix with the salted water, and the salted water will rot the wood and make for a horrible mess. You would do better to work with base rock, honeycomb rock, or live rock (if its submerged). Many of the rocks used to decorate freshwater tanks should be avoided because there is a high risk of them containing many different types of metals and other elements that can have an adverse reaction when exposed to the salt water.

Hope this helps.
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Old 03-04-2010, 12:13 AM   #3
 
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Originally Posted by bettababy View Post
I think because you are only dealing with a total water volume of less than 20 gallons (keep in mind that decor and rock, substrate, etc. will displace some of the water volume), that stocking list sounds a bit much. I think I would pick either chromides or celebese rainbows to go with the skippers and call it full. I hope you are using a good filtration unit designed for saltwater and big enough to handle a heavy waste load.

The one big change I would make is the driftwood... I'd get that out of there asap. Driftwood does not mix with brackish or marine aquariums. Tannic acid that is found in driftwood is not a good mix with the salted water, and the salted water will rot the wood and make for a horrible mess. You would do better to work with base rock, honeycomb rock, or live rock (if its submerged). Many of the rocks used to decorate freshwater tanks should be avoided because there is a high risk of them containing many different types of metals and other elements that can have an adverse reaction when exposed to the salt water.

Hope this helps.
Yeah... good point. I think ill go with the Chromides cus they will build families if they are happy and they are CUTE.... lol
Also i kinda forgot to add plastic in front of drifwood haha.
and as far as the rock goes I've had it in a pervious salt water tank and had fish without problem. The rock work has live rock mixed with it. I think it was called lace rock.
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Old 03-04-2010, 12:32 AM   #4
 
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Lace rock is touchy. If the pieces are still completely in tact since being in saltwater then I have to assume they'll be safe enough, but if they break, even a small chunk from one of them, please know it is risky to use them. Lace rock is very dense, so provides very little surface area for biological filtration purposes, but this also means that the minerals on the inside of the rock may be very different than what is on the outside. All it takes is 1 small vein of something to cause a problem.

Plastic driftwood... perfect!

Orange chromides sound great, I love them too... very awesome little fish, but can be quite aggressive and territorial as they mature, so watch how they get along as they grow up... If you end up with a pair they may choose a fair amount of territory and defend it fiercely from the others. Would be a good idea to set up a quarantine tank just in case. (unless you already have one)
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Old 03-04-2010, 04:14 AM   #5
 
Well I plan'd on removing the others once i got A pair. I have a friend who is willing to take them. She has a 40 breeder she can put them in (it is a spare tank she is planning to set up just these little guys) course i think she will be getting more and getting the ones from me that don;t pair and sticking them all in at the same time together.

My friend went with me to buy them and feel in love. She said they have cute little personalities. She likes how they watch her from under their hiding place with just their little heads sticking out.
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Old 03-04-2010, 06:28 AM   #6
 
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Be sure to post pictures once you get this tank set up! Chromides aren't exactly the most common of fish so it'll be nice to see some in a member's tank.
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Old 03-08-2010, 11:22 PM   #7
 
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Originally Posted by iamntbatman View Post
Be sure to post pictures once you get this tank set up! Chromides aren't exactly the most common of fish so it'll be nice to see some in a member's tank.
KK here are some pictures. Ill be moving the mangroves into the sand once they get tall enough to be out of the water, read somewhere that they couldnt be submerged lemme know if that is wrogn
IMG_0684.jpg

IMG_0687.jpg
++++++++++++
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Old 03-08-2010, 11:26 PM   #8
 
pictures :)
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Old 03-09-2010, 03:53 AM   #9
 
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I've never kept mangroves but I'm almost positive that you're correct that they won't grow submerged.

That's a pretty cool looking setup though. I can't wait to see it with more moss and with those mangroves more filled in. The one thing I might suggest is getting a plain black background for it, which would bring out the fish and all of the decor while hiding your cords and those internal filters (to a degree, anyway).
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Old 03-09-2010, 03:20 PM   #10
 
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You are correct about the mangroves, they do not grow completely submerged. While they are slow growing, I do feel I should warn you...
We started mangroves in the tide pool at the store, just small shoots like you have... and over the course of about 5 yrs they grew to over 4 ft tall and now another 4 yrs later are over 6 ft tall. They get BIG! You may want to take this into consideration now while they are small and not yet rooting solidly in the tank. To move them once they grow big will stress them and possibly kill them, but eventually they'll get too big for that aquarium.

Otherwise, tank looks quite awesome! Good job!
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