shrimp shedding its skin - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 8 Old 08-08-2008, 03:55 PM Thread Starter
New Member
 
shrimp shedding its skin

okay, got home from work and was met with a nice little surprise, i had to do a double take. my shrimp shed his skin, antennaes (or whatever they are called) included. okay, for my stupid beginner question-does it need to be removed? i swear, before i got a good look at it and i saw two sets of antennaes from a distance, i thought for split second that there was another one in there-lol!!
sillyzoedog is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 Old 08-08-2008, 09:51 PM
Member
 
SKAustin's Avatar
 
You really should remove it if it's easily accessible.

Take pride in what you do, for it is a reflection of who you are.


The Haunting Grounds - SKAustin's Reef Diary - Part 2 (the 75g upgrade)
SKAustin is offline  
post #3 of 8 Old 08-08-2008, 10:30 PM Thread Starter
New Member
 
thanks, sounds like a silly question, but i figure each time i reach my hand or a net down into the tank i am disrupting the tank and livestock, freaking out the fish, so i really try avoid doing that.
sillyzoedog is offline  
post #4 of 8 Old 08-09-2008, 12:18 AM
Member
 
SKAustin's Avatar
 
Get yourself a pair of Grabbers. Feed your fish frozen foods with them, that way they become accustomed to them being in the tank and arent bothered when you need to use them. They come in handy too.

Take pride in what you do, for it is a reflection of who you are.


The Haunting Grounds - SKAustin's Reef Diary - Part 2 (the 75g upgrade)
SKAustin is offline  
post #5 of 8 Old 08-09-2008, 07:30 AM
Member
 
Pasfur's Avatar
 
Also, shrimp utilize iodine in the molting process. It is a good idea to dose iodine in an aquarium with invertebrates, regardless of whether or not you have corals. In such cases, you would cut back dramatically on the recommended dose, say 25% recommended dose.
Pasfur is offline  
post #6 of 8 Old 08-09-2008, 02:31 PM
Member
 
iamntbatman's Avatar
 
I know that most freshwater shrimp should be allowed to eat their molted skin. How come you shouldn't let saltwater shrimp do the same?

4 8 15 16 23 42
iamntbatman is offline  
post #7 of 8 Old 08-09-2008, 03:31 PM
Member
 
SKAustin's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pasfur
Also, shrimp utilize iodine in the molting process. It is a good idea to dose iodine in an aquarium with invertebrates, regardless of whether or not you have corals. In such cases, you would cut back dramatically on the recommended dose, say 25% recommended dose.

I highly recommend against dosing iodine without a good understanding of the facts surrounding its supplementation. The reduced dose, as mark suggested, may be a good compromise short term, but excess iodine in the system can become problematic. There has long been debate on whether or not supplementing iodine is necessary at all. There are a large number of natural forms of iodine (some toxic), and available testing kits can only detect a small subset of the total forms present in aquaria.

I recommend the following for further reading on the subject.

http://advancedaquarist.com/issues/mar2003/chem.htm

http://advancedaquarist.com/issues/april2003/chem.htm

Take pride in what you do, for it is a reflection of who you are.


The Haunting Grounds - SKAustin's Reef Diary - Part 2 (the 75g upgrade)
SKAustin is offline  
post #8 of 8 Old 08-09-2008, 05:25 PM
Member
 
Pasfur's Avatar
 
I am about 2/3 of the way into the first article and already realize that I am about to start a new thread, so that others may participate in the discussion, or have the opportunity to ask questions and be on topic.

In the interest of this thread, I would highly encourage anyone who is currently dosing iodine or iodide, or is considering such, to read the attached links above. These articles are written by Randy-Holmes Farley, with support from Ron Shimek. This fact alone is enough to raise my eyebrows and reconsider.

There have been many other issues over the years in the marine hobby that have been considered common place at one time, and as the hobby has advanced are no longer common today. The marine hobby is still in its infancy, especially the reef aspect of the hobby and our understanding of the water chemistry going on inside the glass box we call a mini-reef. In my new thread i will attempt to bring these issues up, hoping that others can contribute in a way similar to how SK has contributed on this thread.
Pasfur is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
fan shrimp shed skin daisycutter Freshwater Journals 2 11-17-2008 07:50 AM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome