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post #21 of 59 Old 02-10-2009, 11:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Tyyrlym View Post
It's also called cheating.

I was giving and example. I'm not doing that8)

And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea...

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post #22 of 59 Old 02-11-2009, 06:46 PM Thread Starter
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well i took out the filter and now my water is cloudy.... its been 24 hours
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post #23 of 59 Old 02-11-2009, 06:57 PM
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Originally Posted by clint3240 View Post
so you are saying i do not need a filter in my tank? not even a sump? all i need is the water changes, skimmer, liverock and water flow?
This is an accurate statement.

However, there are certain benefits to a sump that make them highly desirable. The sump increases the overall water volume, helping to stabilize the system. It is an "out of eyesight" place to put your protein skimmer, dosing equipment, refugium, frags, etc. Most people prefer a sump if it is not an inconvenience.
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post #24 of 59 Old 02-11-2009, 07:56 PM
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Originally Posted by clint3240 View Post
well i took out the filter and now my water is cloudy.... its been 24 hours

I'm not sure what to tell you. Something must be wrong in the tank for the water to be cloudy without those filters, I've never run them in my tank and I've always had crystal clear water. I've never battled cloudy water in a saltwater tank, so I don't have much advice to give here. I've never heard of saltwater tanks being susceptable to algae blooms in the water like freshwater tanks, though I suppose I've never heard that they DON'T get them either. Either way, I wouldn't imagine you'd have a bloom immediately after removing a portion of your filtration, so I don't think its a bloom (just the only thing I know of that causes cloudy water).

What I do know is, in the long run not using the canister/hang-on-back sponge filter is a good thing. All of us who have posted in this thread follow our own advice, and have successful tanks.

We should try and figure out what is the cause of the cloudiness, then figure out what needs to be done to fix it. I guarantee the only solution won't be to put a canister filter back on the tank.

What are your nitrate readings?

"To an optimist, the glass is half-full;
to a pessimist, the glass is half-empty;
to an engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"
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post #25 of 59 Old 02-11-2009, 08:01 PM
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Did you test ammonia and nitrite? I suspect they will be zero, proving that you did not get a bacteria bloom.

I think you simply disturbed some detritus or sand and caused temporary clouding.
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post #26 of 59 Old 02-11-2009, 08:17 PM
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Brainstorm...

The water is cloudy... not a result of the biological filter removal... not likely a result of particulates suspended...
cloudy water... what else causes cloudy water.... diatoms, algaes... but these don't tie into the filter removal...

what else do we know... pH is low and has stayed low.... possible alkalinity or calcium issues, which still have not been tested.... 1 year old tank starting to get brown algae growth on substrate... phosphate spike?... if phosphates are high, which is likely, a test kit could show zero if the phosphates were being quickly utilized...

ok.... so we have assumed phosphates, low pH, hypothesis of low alkalinity and low calcium... but you are using a 2 part balanced buffer... so alkalinity and calcium should theoretically be within range... so why is the pH low?... we need to figure this out...

what else changed when the filter was removed?... water flow. We have less water flow and less surface agitation... possible increase in carbon dioxide... increase in carbonic acids... I wonder what impact the filter removal had on pH?... on alkalinity... could this be a precipitation you are seeing?

This is a brainstorm. Not a solution.

Have you tested pH again?
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post #27 of 59 Old 02-11-2009, 08:47 PM
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atta way to use your noggin Pasfur! I'm really interested to follow this along and see what we figure out, this is solid gold as far as learning goes

"To an optimist, the glass is half-full;
to a pessimist, the glass is half-empty;
to an engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"
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post #28 of 59 Old 02-11-2009, 09:08 PM Thread Starter
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not good, i just tested for ammonia and there is .25-1 in the tank and my snails are dropping like flys, just got an emergency at work i gota fly and ill test the rest when i get back....nitrates are 12.5 high range...nitrite is negative..
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post #29 of 59 Old 02-11-2009, 09:18 PM
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good to know, it looks like your tank is going through a mini-cycle, the media in the filter that you removed must have had a lot of your bacteria population. In time the bacteria will replenish itself in your liverock, but let's figure out a short-term solution to save your livestock.

Pasfur, do you think it would be a good idea to place the sponge or whatever media was in the filter into the display somewhere (hopefully its not too late... i.e. dried out or thrown away)? That would place the bacteria back in the tank and consume the ammonia spike, while simultaneously seeding the liverock and speeding up the colonization of the liverock with bacteria (?).

I don't know yet whether or not the cloudiness is related to the mini-cycle that's happening, but either way lets get that taken care of to save your fishes and inverts!

"To an optimist, the glass is half-full;
to a pessimist, the glass is half-empty;
to an engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"
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post #30 of 59 Old 02-11-2009, 09:22 PM
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btw, IMHO I don't think the nitrate reading of 12.5 is bad, though it might explain the diatoms. My tank has nitrates that stay in the 5-10 range, and I have some diatoms that grow on the sand on each side of my tank where the flow is the lowest.

Anyways, the nitrates aren't high enough to cause a serious problem in the tank, so that's good news .

"To an optimist, the glass is half-full;
to a pessimist, the glass is half-empty;
to an engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"
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