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Mega Powerful Nitrate and Phosphate Remover - DIY!

This is a discussion on Mega Powerful Nitrate and Phosphate Remover - DIY! within the Beginner Saltwater Aquariums forums, part of the Saltwater Fish and Coral Reef Tanks category; --> I thought you said you could fit 13" width? Definately need several pics of the sump areas. Also, actual measurements of N and P. ...

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Mega Powerful Nitrate and Phosphate Remover - DIY!
Old 01-20-2009, 10:18 PM   #131
 
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I thought you said you could fit 13" width? Definately need several pics of the sump areas. Also, actual measurements of N and P. Is there nuisance algae in the display?
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Old 01-20-2009, 10:46 PM   #132
 
13 " would give me 1/2" on each side space (width is 14"). The only way I see to do it is with a pump out of the sump & have the residual water come back into the sump. Computer has got some problems this week, 17" tall would be max. With your experience what size pump would I need?

Thanks andy

Yes algea comes & goes over 10 yrs, po4 remover constantly used.
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Old 01-20-2009, 11:14 PM   #133
 
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13" X 35gph = 455gph.

Don't plan anything untill you post pics of the sump.
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Old 01-21-2009, 12:05 AM   #134
 
Kinda dirty but here ya go









The only place I see is above one of the cutouts with a powerhead so I do not have to worry about a bucket overflowing.
I can get 11" wide at the cutouts by 14" tall before it hits water=154 sq inches. How many do I need?

What about flow, Too many margaritas time to sleep. Do I need 2 ?


This will be an excellent tank to atch the numbers. I will get a base starting point this weekend. I have read all the posts, do you think the first posts you made with the materials is the best.

1 large tang 9"
3 Tangs 5"
Poop Machines!


Thanks
Andy
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Old 01-21-2009, 01:51 PM   #135
 
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Ok this is not that hard. You can put a screen in both holes, as large as will comfortably fit. Put a pump on each one, so you can clean one while leaving the other running. Put 2 clip-on lights on each one (total of 4 lights; 23W bulbs, 2700K). Remove the GFO, chaeto, any and all mechanical filters. You say the 2" DSB is in the sump? If so, remove it. Your N and P will be gone in 4 to 8 weeks. Quicker if you do keep doing waterchanges.
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Old 01-21-2009, 06:41 PM   #136
 
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.
Today's Success of the Day, from OceanParks on the MFT site, had a good story to it. So here it is with his posts and the dates:

12/17: SantiMonica: I've also built and installed your screen. I am on day 5. I have the brown/green film and was wondering how long before you start to see a noticable drop in Nitrates? I have a 110 gal reef tank with fish and my Nitrates are at 20ppm. Thanks.

12/18: and what wattage bulb would you suggest (pc flood) would you recommend for better results?

1/5: Ok. So I read your thread and built a scrubber (a true hobbyist). I'm in the middle of week three and I've done 2 cleanings and one freshwater rinse. Nitrates began at 30ppm and are now down to 5ppm (with the help of a 40% water change) in this 110 gallon reef tank. I removed the skimmer and UV sterilizer to allow room for the scrubber. I will compose a more formal, descriptive posting in the near future on my setup - one that I hope you will use in your RESULTS postings. I am still trying to get a grip of this thread thing....it is my first one. Did you say that you were getting better results with a different light bulb. If so can you please specify? Thanks! Enjoy the pictures! What do ya think?










1/5: [Remove the filter socks.] Really about the socks? I'm afraid of too may particles floating around. I'll give it a try. Also, can I get the plant-grow bulb at Home Depot and is it in Flood form? I have the timer set for 16hrs on and 8hrs off, however, I get excited and want to turn them on early for (in my mind) faster results. Probably no better results? Ok. Off with the socks. Good idea. Is the grow-light a flood light like those pc flood light? Thanks for the help! I will send a full report and pictures in a few weeks!

1/7: I replaced my flood lights with 2700K "soft white" PC Flood lights today. Same wattage...they just seem dimmer. It's that red light. Hope it works better.

1/12: I spent some time reviewing the begining of this thread and noticed that most of the pictures showed bright green thick mats of algea on the screen. I am not getting that after 5 weeks. I am getting dark brown/red stuff and it's only about 1/4" combined. [The stealthy high-nutrient black/brown algae that must be removed right away.] I did use some of the brown/red stuff to seed the new screen when I built it. Should I rebuild the screen and seed it with some hair algae from the tank? [not now.] Also, at the bottom of my sump, beneath the screen there is red/brown slime forming (see picture). Should I remove/treat for this or can it be concidered benefitial? [leave it.]

1/12: Here is 5.1 oz of the black oil (I read from your other site). Funny enough, under the layer of black stuff there was some bright green algae. Any thoughts on that? [that's why it needs to be removed right away.]

1/20: CLEAR!!!!!! My scrubber has been up since December 18th and tonight the Nitrate test (Nutrafin) read clear indicating 0 nitrates! Awesome. Thank you SantiMonica. Awesome. 0 Nitrates on the Salifert Test too.
.
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Old 01-22-2009, 02:20 PM   #137
 
Santa Monica,

I would need to use an external pump located in the sump. Are there any brands you would reccomend for this? Looks like 2 screens at 11" would be a 385gph pump each. Maxijet I think is 300gph.

Your first preference was from crafts etc. for the mesh. Does that still hold true?

This is their ultra stiff plastic canvas, any comments on it?

http://www.craftsetc.com/store/item.aspx?ItemId=30782&dep=20&cat=18&subcat=5


Thanks
Andy
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Old 01-22-2009, 04:43 PM   #138
 
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This is not the sump? By "external" pump do you mean one that sits out-of-water? If the pump will sit out of water, any self-priming pump (like Eheims) will work. If you mean it will be setting in the water, then anything will do.

The plastic canvas you linked to is fine. Best if two layers are tied or melted together.
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Old 01-22-2009, 08:32 PM   #139
 
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One of the big benefits of a scrubber is that it keeps food in the water. Here is an update pertaining to this:

Part 1 of 7:

Taken from "Reef Food" by Eric Borneman:
Reef Food by Eric Borneman - Reefkeeping.com

"Detritus, marine snow, particulate organic material, and suspended particulate matter are all names for the bits of "dirt" [food] that flow around the reef; material that is composed of fecal material, borings, algae, plant material, mucus, associated bacteria, cyanobacteria and other particles. Decomposers (mainly bacteria and associated flora and fauna) break down waste material in the water, on the reef, and primarily, in the soft sediments. The result of their presence and action is not only a food source in and of itself, but provides raw material for channeling back into the food chain, largely through the benthic algae and phytoplankton.

"Phytoplankton [food] are small unicellular algae, or protists, that drift in the water column. They may be very abundant in and around coral reefs, and they are capable of absorbing large amounts of organic and inorganic nutrients. [...] Some of the reef animals can feed directly on phytoplankton; many soft corals, some sponges, almost all clams, feather-duster worms, and other filter feeders utilize phytoplankton directly as a food source. Small animals in the water column, termed zooplankton [food], also utilize phytoplankton as a food source. For the smaller zooplankton, phytoplankton and bacteria are the primary food source.

"Both of the [photos not shown] are from reefs on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. The left photo shows the clear "nutrient poor" (oligotrophic) waters of the outer reefs. The right photo is of an inshore "nutrient rich" lagoon reef off Townsville. Notice how coral coverage in both systems is high, and even though the green phytoplankton-filled lagoonal reef is nutrient rich, it supports a high density of Acropora.

"Coral reef food sources, then, are largely produced by the ocean. Bacteria, detritus, phytoplankton, zooplankton, small benthic fauna, mucus, and dissolved organic and inorganic material of various types and sizes are what comprise the majority of food on a coral reef.

"In aquaria, we are faced with several realities. Our phytoplankton and zooplankton populations are generally negligible to non-existent in comparison with coral reef communities. Those which do exist are either rapidly consumed without having a chance to reproduce, or they are rapidly removed or killed by pumps and filtering devices or suspension-feeders. Coral mucus, bacteria, detritus, larval benthos and other "psuedo-plankton" might be present in a reasonable amount if the water column were not stripped. On the other hand, dissolved organic and inorganic material [nitrate, phosphate] levels are frequently much higher than they are in the ocean. [...] Even very well maintained aquaria are generally found with much higher levels of nitrogen and phosphorous than wild communities. Even though many desirable organisms are able to utilize these nutrients, levels in most aquaria are very unnatural, and coral reefs under such conditions often wane or die - a process known as eutrophication.

"It is the lack of water column-based food that results in limited success with the maintenance of some desirable animals, such as crinoids, flame scallops, clams, certain corals, sponges, bryozoans, and many other invertebrates. Even the symbiotic (zooxanthellate) corals [like SPS] suffer, despite many obvious long-term successes with these animals.

"In terms of previously mentioned export mechanisms, it really does little good to be cultivating or adding more food material in the water column if it is all being rapidly removed by filtration devices. Live rock and sand provide abundant filtration, and some of the articles in past issues describing the set-up and use of unskimmed tanks are, in my experience, something that should be seriously considered. Algae Turf Scrubbers are also viable systems that provide low ambient water nutrient levels [of nitrate and phosphate] while maintaining higher amounts of food and particulate matter in the water. I also feel that if protein skimmers are used, they should probably be used in an intermittent fashion.
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Old 01-23-2009, 10:54 AM   #140
 
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Originally Posted by SantaMonica View Post
This is not the sump? By "external" pump do you mean one that sits out-of-water? If the pump will sit out of water, any self-priming pump (like Eheims) will work. If you mean it will be setting in the water, then anything will do.

The plastic canvas you linked to is fine. Best if two layers are tied or melted together.
Submersable, in the sump. Simple & cheap would be MJ1200, might have to narrow the 11" to 9 (9X 35=315gph) I think they are rated at 295 gph

I am going to the sewing store this weekend & pick up some material. My tangs have got so large the poop & amout of food is unbelieveable. My 200 will put this to a good test.

Found this bulb local:

http://www.lightbulbdepot.com/produc...38&prod=29715A

Thanks for all the information.

Last edited by Andy; 01-23-2009 at 10:58 AM..
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