Iodine and other evolving marine practices
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Iodine and other evolving marine practices

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Iodine and other evolving marine practices
Old 08-10-2008, 06:53 AM   #1
 
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Iodine and other evolving marine practices

One of the first things for the new marine hobbyists to understand is that the marine aquarium is a relatively new hobby and advancements are made frequently.

When new information is discovered by the scientific community, it can take years for this information to circulate. The internet makes this more difficult, because many casual hobbyists are providing information that is outdated and has been proven incorrect.

I want to very quickly make reference to some of the changes that have occurred in the evolution of the marine aquarium. If anyone has good reference to recent articles or information, please provide the links. Lets limit this to expert opinions, rather than internet chats by the casual hobbyist.

Topics:

1) Iodine additions may or may not be suitable for the marine aquarium.
http://www.reefs.org/library/article...rchterm=iodine
http://advancedaquarist.com/issues/mar2003/chem.htm
http://advancedaquarist.com/issues/april2003/chem.htm

2) Strontium additions may or may not be suitable for the marine aquarium. For those hobbyists new to this process, in the 1990's almost every reefkeeper added Strontium to aid in coral growth. Over time, studies suggested that corals excreted Strontium because it is toxic. This is still open for debate.
http://advancedaquarist.com/issues/april2003/chem.htm
http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issu...2/aquarium.htm
And an article promoting strontium:
http://www.reefs.org/library/talklog...term=strontium

3) How to achieve denitrification. The debate over how deep a sand bed, how effective, and if to use a plenum.
http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issu...02/feature.htm
http://www.reefs.org/library/aquariu...enitrification

4) The use of a UV Sterilizer on a reef system. I personally use one. This is a topic of controversy.
This recent article by Jay Warrick supports my belief:
http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issu...3/beginner.htm

We can continue this process forever if we want. There are literally dozens of issues in this hobby that are still evolving. However, many issues have been resolved and can not be disputed. Yet we still see these mistakes being made. Why? Here is one such example:

5) The correct method of filtration for a marine aquarium. Successful marine systems, especially reef systems, do not use biological filter media.
http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issu...2002/rb102.htm
http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issu...3/aquarium.htm
http://www.reefs.org/library/newbieg...tml#filtration
IF YOU HAVE A BIOWHEEL OR BIOBALLS ON YOUR REEF TANK PLEASE READ THE ARTICLES ABOVE.-)

This thread is getting long, but hopefully this will make some hobbyists more open to opinions that conflict with the own. I have been in this hobby for over 20 years and I still learn almost every day. There is nothing wrong with being wrong! As new information is discovered, we all should be making changes to our fishkeeping techniques.

Please post any contributions to the topics above. Or post additional controversial topics with links.
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Old 08-10-2008, 01:12 PM   #2
 
Great post with a lot of information.

Have you ever heard of people using vodka to get rid of ammonia and nitrates in their excess changed water?
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Old 08-10-2008, 03:01 PM   #3
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat_Fender_40
Have you ever heard of people using vodka to get rid of ammonia and nitrates in their excess changed water?
Can't say that i have.
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Old 08-11-2008, 03:26 PM   #4
 
There's a guy I know in town that does it and I've read about on the net because I never heard it before. It's pretty controversial, but still interesting.
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Old 08-11-2008, 03:47 PM   #5
 
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Ive read about it in the past and never entertained the thought. I dont generally support ideas that suggest there is a means by which to bypass good husbandry practices. Most of these ideas are dangerous ploy that result in other problems, and serve only to promote the laziness of humanity. Nonetheless, here's some information by Eric Borneman

Vodka in the aquarium
http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2004-10/eb/index.php
http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2004-1...ture/index.php
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