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getting a "professional" to set up a new saltwater

This is a discussion on getting a "professional" to set up a new saltwater within the Beginner Saltwater Aquariums forums, part of the Saltwater Fish and Coral Reef Tanks category; --> Originally Posted by shie Blue, what exactly do you do daily for a saltwater and a freshwater tank. Physical labor. You do water changes ...

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getting a "professional" to set up a new saltwater
Old 09-29-2006, 10:43 PM   #11
 
Lupin's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shie
Blue, what exactly do you do daily for a saltwater and a freshwater tank.
Physical labor.
You do water changes and gravel vacuuming. It's very important to eliminate all detritus.
Additionally for marine, you add salt to replace the salt lost during water changes as previously stated.

I used to have marine myself. But that was 8 years ago.
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Old 09-29-2006, 10:47 PM   #12
 
Its realy not that hard i first thought "o man every day ill just stick to once a week" but this past week ive done it every day and i got used to it to me its something fun to do
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Old 09-29-2006, 11:25 PM   #13
 
Is it an hour or more everyday?
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Old 09-29-2006, 11:26 PM   #14
 
You may have to ask what is covered in the monthly maintenance. They may just clean glass and detritus on the rocks and stuff, and leave the water changes up to you.

Otherwise, if his monthly maintenance includes the water changes, filter maintenace, etc. see if he has a contract that stipulates that in the event the fish die to poor maintenance, that he will cover the replacement.
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Old 09-29-2006, 11:33 PM   #15
 
He already said there is no guarantee on the fish and he will do the water change and the chemicals.
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Old 09-30-2006, 12:25 AM   #16
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shie
He already said there is no guarantee on the fish and he will do the water change and the chemicals.
Shie, in terms of maintenance, we do not agree on the use of chemicals. They won't completely work except the dechlorinator which eliminates chlorine and other heavy metals making water safe for the fish.

If I were you, I'd just do everything myself rather than asking the help of an "expert". It's up to you whether you'd like his help or not but I still find it a complete waste especially when all those works can be done by a fishkeeper himself.

Th trick is simply to keep everything simple. I can see some people buying an expensive filter system(because they think the more expensive it is, the better the quality/work it will do) and then ending up with dead fish in a few days.
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Old 09-30-2006, 08:40 AM   #17
 
I find the maintence with both way about the same. Except saltwater you have to be more carefully what you do because the fish or more sensitive. The maintence on my reef system includes:
Quote:
For marine, it is often suggested that daily maintenance is best but weekly will do(unless Usmc objects ).
weekly
Testing
adding water that has evaporated

Monthly
Cleaning the sump tank
Cleaning the protien skimmer
Cleaning my Magnum filter

I never do a water change on mine as the tank is well established and the water evaporates out of it so quickly that I have to add at least 5 gallons of it a week.

Shie, if you want to really do a FOSW setup I would give it a try. I was I same way you are now. I thought it was going to be diffacult to do it. I have found out that the maintence is the same in both like crazie.eddie stated. The cost to start it a saltwater is very expensive as the lighting is the biggest expense. I think if you feel like you can handle a saltwater. give it a try.The family at FishForum well be glad to help you out as much as we can.
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Old 09-30-2006, 10:26 AM   #18
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by usmc121581
I find the maintence with both way about the same. Except saltwater you have to be more carefully what you do because the fish or more sensitive. The maintence on my reef system includes:
Quote:
For marine, it is often suggested that daily maintenance is best but weekly will do(unless Usmc objects ).
weekly
Testing
adding water that has evaporated

Monthly
Cleaning the sump tank
Cleaning the protien skimmer
Cleaning my Magnum filter

I never do a water change on mine as the tank is well established and the water evaporates out of it so quickly that I have to add at least 5 gallons of it a week.
Are you using RO water or tap water for your top-offs?
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Old 09-30-2006, 12:34 PM   #19
 
Hello shie!

I think that you would definitely learn more about marine ecosystems and how to maintain one by yourself. Most people on this forum have learned so by trial and error and have posted most of thier errors ( no offense guys :D:D:D) so that you wont make the same thing. Taking care of a saltwater aquarium has never been easier with people to help you.

You can red tons of articles and things on starting out a saltwater aquarium. and you dont need a professional to do it because it doesnt take one to.

I am only 15 years old and I guess you can say I have started early. I have read tons of things on saltwater reefs and aquariums for about a month and this has helped me to understand them better. The big words and fancy names might seem scary at first but it will be something you can get accustomed to..

Dont be intimidated by how much "labor" there is (which isnt very much) but how much fun it is. I dont mind spending 10-30 minutes a day checking up on my aqurium and seeing if I get any more hitchhikers on my rocks. It is awesome to look at your tank and see the many verts and fish flowing in the wave of your powerhead, happy and energetic.

Doing it yourself will also give you a very very big sense of accomplishment. It will take time and knowledge and you should have fun with it! This hobby shouldnt be frustrating or stressful but in fact enjoyable.
dont worry, everyone is here to help!
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Old 09-30-2006, 09:54 PM   #20
 
Actually tmfreak I have been doing this for many years and I kinda take offense to you stating
Quote:
Most people on this forum have learned so by trial and error and have posted most of thier errors
I have never learned something about marine ecosystems by trial and error.
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