Angel Question - Page 3
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Saltwater Fish and Coral Reef Tanks » Beginner Saltwater Aquariums » Angel Question

Angel Question

This is a discussion on Angel Question within the Beginner Saltwater Aquariums forums, part of the Saltwater Fish and Coral Reef Tanks category; --> Originally Posted by Pasfur There is something missing still. More information that we are not getting. Niger Triggers are EXTREMELY easy to keep. You ...

Check out these saltwater fish profiles
Sailfin Tang
Sailfin Tang
Naso Tang
Naso Tang
Reply
Old 06-30-2009, 09:36 PM   #21
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pasfur View Post
There is something missing still. More information that we are not getting. Niger Triggers are EXTREMELY easy to keep. You almost have to cook this fish for dinner if you want it to die.

First, can you confirm that the Niger Trigger you are talking about is "Odonus niger" Triggers and Filefish Maybe we are not talking about the same fish.

Tell me about the trip home from the LFS. I am having images of a car ride home in 110 degree heat with a 3 year old child holding a plastic bag up in the air as you bounce around on a dirt road in your Convertible Jeep.

Describe how you pick out a fish to purchase. As we confident that you bought healthy fish to begin with?

By any chance did you test the water in the transport bag after you opened the bag? This is possibly an issue. Probably where we will find the problem.

I think you tank water is fine. The big 3, ammonia, nitrite, and pH are generally the cause of short term rapid deaths. Nitrate, calcium, and alkalinity are keys to long term success with existing livestock.

I would suggest that you begin using the quarantine again. Just test the water to ensure you are providing a high quality environment in the Q tank. For the record, the Powder Brown Tang is one of the most difficult to keep of all aquarium fish. You probably just bought a stressed fish.
Okay just did a 20% water change; took out 15 gallons and replaced it with fresh seawater mix with spot on ph, nitrate, nitrite and amonia levels as recommended. So far so good. No fish in distress and water looks clearer. Vacumed a bit of the sand bed as well and got any debris out of the tank that I could find. Plan is to let things ettle down for a bit and see what happens. Your thoughts?
mdrobc13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2009, 08:39 PM   #22
 
Pasfur's Avatar
 
If you can't think of any additional information that we have not discussed, then I suggest continuing to do 10% weekly water changes, wait 90 days, and then add new livestock. I am a strict believer in this 90 day rule, as far to many problems reoccur within a 6 to 8 week period, be it disease or other water issues.
Pasfur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2009, 11:23 PM   #23
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pasfur View Post
If you can't think of any additional information that we have not discussed, then I suggest continuing to do 10% weekly water changes, wait 90 days, and then add new livestock. I am a strict believer in this 90 day rule, as far to many problems reoccur within a 6 to 8 week period, be it disease or other water issues.
Got it. Added 3 damsels (small ones); 1 survived and the water is stable. Will add some more live rock as it can only help buffer my water and try the regular water changes you suggest. We'll see how it goes I guess!
mdrobc13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2009, 06:01 AM   #24
 
Pasfur's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdrobc13 View Post
Got it. Added 3 damsels (small ones); 1 survived and the water is stable. Will add some more live rock as it can only help buffer my water and try the regular water changes you suggest.
Just for clarification, live rock does not buffer the water. However, live rock processes organic waste, removing acids which cause a depletion of your buffers. Hence, the more live rock, the more rapid processing of waste. In any case, calcium replenishment and water changes will still be necessary to maintain a stable alkalinity, as determined by your test results.

Also, be careful how you evaluate the stability of your system. There are hundred of ions in saltwater, only a small few of which we test with a test kit. I think you are doing the right thing at this point by taking it slow and choosing not to add more fish until a series of what changes have been completed.
Pasfur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2009, 09:36 AM   #25
 
P Asfur. Thanks for the help. Just did water change on Tue afternoon of 5.5 gallons (approx 5-10% change). Tested waterthe night prior and PH okay, Alk=high >2.9, Amonia=0.25, Nitrite=0.0, Nitrates=60 (high), temp=78 therefore the water change yesterday after work.

Unfotunately I lost my clown tang last night! :( RIP. Remaining fish are doing okay. Feeding and active. So I will leave them alone and continue my weekly 10% water changes for thru Aug like you suggest. Only other change was I added about 10-15 additional pounds of live aquacultured rock and a few hermits (doing well also). NO FISH. Thoughts?
mdrobc13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2009, 09:03 PM   #26
 
Pasfur's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdrobc13 View Post
Unfotunately I lost my clown tang last night!
Ouch. How long did you keep him? Very difficult fish.
Pasfur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2009, 11:30 AM   #27
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pasfur View Post
Ouch. How long did you keep him? Very difficult fish.
Didn't know that before I bought him unfortunately. Was one of those spur of the moment purchases when I saw him at the LFS and inquired and was told price and that they are really good fish. Good=pretty or good=hardy and easy to keep didn't know and wasn't provided that info. Sort of like when I bought a Potter's Angel when I 1st started my tank. He didn't last a week before he disappeared into my life rockwork never to be seen again! :(

Opps to anwser your question; I had my Clown Tang about 6 months if I am correct. He was doing fine up until my recent water troubles/problems and would eat and swim without any problems and had inhabited a nice live/artificial rock cave which I had created in my tank and which he'd cleared out of other inhabitants! LOL

Do you still think it is the water as my Purple Tang, Maroon Clown, lone damsel, and P.Asfur angel are all doing fine?
mdrobc13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2009, 02:07 PM   #28
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pasfur View Post
Ouch. How long did you keep him? Very difficult fish.
Hey Pasfur....a thought? Am still running Cannister's on BOTH my tanks along with Protien skimmers, airstone, and the Korella waver maker and UV sterilizer on the main tank. I run both Cannisters rated for 100gal Max flo rates (Brand I forgot but are equivalent to fluval 750 I think) with media which I clean monthly. Previously used them with freshwater tanks but am thinking should I try to find a small sump (space is an issue) to use and powerheads and switch over to that and just run the cannister's empty for flow and with polishing pad? OR should I just go and get powerheads and if so which kind should I go for. On both tanks space is limited below for a big huge sump so what size am I looking at here?

Thoughts?
mdrobc13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2009, 07:58 AM   #29
 
Pasfur's Avatar
 
Rob,

I'm confuse by your question. What are you trying to improve? In other words, what outcome are you attempting to achieve by changing the current setup?

I personally do not recommend canister filters on marine aquariums. They are very efficient at trapping waste, which allow the waste to break down, introducing both nitrates and phosphates into the water. I would personally just remove the canister filter completely, or perhaps use it on a Quarantine tank, or even use it for a few hours each week running a diatom filter pad for water polishing and pathogen removal.

I think with your aquarium the water is the only culprit I would consider. The existing livestock have slowly adjusted to the environment, but something is causing new fish to quickly perish. So yes, I would stick with the plan of a series of water changes over several months before adding new livestock.
Pasfur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2009, 08:29 PM   #30
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pasfur View Post
Rob,

I'm confuse by your question. What are you trying to improve? In other words, what outcome are you attempting to achieve by changing the current setup?

I personally do not recommend canister filters on marine aquariums. They are very efficient at trapping waste, which allow the waste to break down, introducing both nitrates and phosphates into the water. I would personally just remove the canister filter completely, or perhaps use it on a Quarantine tank, or even use it for a few hours each week running a diatom filter pad for water polishing and pathogen removal.

I think with your aquarium the water is the only culprit I would consider. The existing livestock have slowly adjusted to the environment, but something is causing new fish to quickly perish. So yes, I would stick with the plan of a series of water changes over several months before adding new livestock.
Hey P Asfur. Sorry for the confusion. What I mean was with my current setup should I go ahead and just A) get rid of the cannister filters? B) use them WITHOUT the media for water flow/mvmt only c) continue as I currently am using them with media but changing them out every month. d)look for small sumps to purchase and add to all 3 tanks!

I now have 3 tanks (was in the process of starting up a 56 gallon corner upstairs in our guest/spare room) so that's alot of cannister filters to change out! Each tank has significant sand beds 4+ inches, 2 have skimmers, and all have at least 40-50lbs of live rock! As for the cannister filetrs I already have them as I was previously using them on my freshwater setups and didn't know that they were not good to use or inefficient for marine set ups which is why I'd been using them for the past 6-12+ months with my two initial setups. Since my previous chiclids did okay with them and they kept their tanks pretty clean/actually crystal clean I thought they'd be okay. Why do they advertise them on the box tho as good for marine setups and freshwater ones?

As for the main tank...all fish are still fine and I am planning to continue water changes and gentle feeding as discussed previously. My 2nd tank is doing great with the newly added skimmer (hang on back type) and cannister filter with current fish. Only thing I've added was a couple of more pounds of live rock acquacultured that my LFS got in. Any thoughts on that or is it just expensive fish food! LOL :)

Thanks for the help!
mdrobc13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Angel - light question rsn48 Freshwater Aquarium Equipment 13 01-27-2010 08:24 AM
Angel fish question tribal Saltwater Fish 3 08-24-2009 08:31 PM
Angel Fish question Discusgirl18 Freshwater and Tropical Fish 5 03-09-2009 04:01 AM
angel beweeb Tropical Fish Diseases 5 07-26-2008 04:05 PM
fat angel girlofgod Tropical Fish Diseases 18 11-30-2006 05:59 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:58 AM.