What Is the Fert Deficiency of my Sword? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #1 of 19 Old 01-21-2013, 06:10 PM Thread Starter
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What Is the Fert Deficiency of my Sword?

Hi. I have diagnosed my Wisteria as having a potassium deficiency, but can anyone diagnose the deficiency my Sword has? I'm going an hour each way to the fish store tomorrow to buy ferts for these two, so please help. Here's a pic of the Sword with dead leaf at the end of the leaf. Thanks.
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post #2 of 19 Old 01-21-2013, 06:38 PM
I can't tell you exactly what it's missing but when I don't keep up on the Seachem root tabs that happens to my swords. If I replace one or two around the bottom of them every couple of weeks they don't have a problem.
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post #3 of 19 Old 01-21-2013, 07:09 PM Thread Starter
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Yeah, I put one in last week - leaves were springing up like rockets. I think those Flourish Root Tabs have the same micronutrrients as Flourish Comprehensive has, which I dose. which leaves N, P, and K (potassium) and maybe some other things which are available and don't have to be dosed. Plenty of N in our tanks, and P too. I suppose that the Sword's problem may also be potassium deficiency. But I absolutely need confirmation.

Thanks for replying first.

Steven
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post #4 of 19 Old 01-22-2013, 12:17 PM
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It may or may not be potassium. But the only way to work out what it is requires us to know what is there now.

What is the GH of your water? And what fertilizers are you using, and how often. This is not a light issue, so I can leave that out.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #5 of 19 Old 01-22-2013, 12:57 PM
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The curling of the leaves makes me think calcium deficiency.
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post #6 of 19 Old 01-22-2013, 12:58 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Byron.

GH = 6
I'm using Seachem Flourish Comprehensive 10 drops per week. I'm also using Equilibrium.

Nitrate = 5
pH = 7.6 using API Master Kit.

If you look in the picture, you can see pinholes on the leftmost Wisteria. The Sword has some signs such as yellowing. Nitrate is ok at 20 ppm, right?

Steven

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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
It may or may not be potassium. But the only way to work out what it is requires us to know what is there now.

What is the GH of your water? And what fertilizers are you using, and how often. This is not a light issue, so I can leave that out.

Byron.
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post #7 of 19 Old 01-22-2013, 02:15 PM Thread Starter
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I read down the composition of Flourish Tabs and there are all kinds of good things in there, including K2O, Fe 2.2%, Ca 14.9%. And, I have 2 wisteria about 3 inches apart and one has the Potassium pinholes and the other doesn't. So I think I've got the problem with the Wisterria, what's left is the Sword.

btw, I put a Flourish Tab under the Sword last week, but its condition has been getting worse over at least a few weeks.

Steven
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post #8 of 19 Old 01-22-2013, 02:50 PM Thread Starter
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As an aside, I have come to a personal identification of the Sword that I have:

Echinodorus major (Ruffled Sword)

Here's a link to the plant:

Ruffled Amazon Sword (Echinodorus major) Profile

Steven
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post #9 of 19 Old 01-22-2013, 02:55 PM
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If the GH is 6 dGH just prior to the weekly water change, and you are adding the Equilibrium at the water change, we can assume this is the lowest level and that should be OK. This equates with what I'm doing and my swords are generally fine.

A Flourish Tab next to the roots, added every 3 months, should be fine, in conjunction with Flourish Comp. I assume this is the 10g tank, so 10 drops might be sufficient...how many drops in a half teaspoon or a teaspoon, so I can figure the math?

I have this very same problem in one tank. I tried potassium for several weeks, and at two different times with a period of several weeks with no additional potassium separating them, and it made no difference. I then considered nitrogen, which of course is ammonium. I wouldn't have thought this the issue, though a plant expert suggested it to me. The fact that the plants grow fine in my 20g which has no fish at all, makes me think something else is doing this. And of course, that would apply to any nutrient, since all my 7 tanks are getting the same fertilizers.

I am planning on experimenting with trace minerals when I get around to buying some; and iron was another possibility, though remote. It is odd that this only occurs with one group of swords, those in the 70g which also has the Flourite substrate that is supposed to be more beneficial than plain sand. All of which only shows how many variables can be involved.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #10 of 19 Old 01-22-2013, 03:12 PM
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Hey, newbie plant guy here so just step on me if I'm off base on this.

That looks like a Ruffled Amazon Sword .... right? So the undulations in the leaves look, more or less, normal.

On my regular swords the outermost leaves die off and need to be pruned... perhaps that is the case here? On your overall tank shot that looks like it may be an outer leaf. As long as the new growth is healthy, green and normal, just prune off the dying stuff and good to go. Although I understand that there may be a re-utilization of the nutrient from a dying outer leaf so it may be best for the plant to leave it until it is next to disintegrating on it's own, if you don't mind the "really natural" look.

Actually, I like the look of that plant... it says it grows more vertical than regular swords, which I would like, but yours seems to be quite spread out. My wife picked ours out but if she had seen the ruffles, I would bet she would have bought it instead.

Jeff.


Total years fish keeping experience: 7 months, can't start counting in years for a while yet.

The shotgun approach to a planted tank with an LED fixture

Small scale nitrogen cycle with a jar, water and fish food; no substrate, filter etc

Last edited by JDM; 01-22-2013 at 03:16 PM.
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