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What about gravel siphoning in the planted tank?

This is a discussion on What about gravel siphoning in the planted tank? within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Originally Posted by redchigh Many people go the 'high tech' route, where you're right... The priority is the plants. Most of us on this ...

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What about gravel siphoning in the planted tank?
Old 04-12-2011, 06:22 PM   #11
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redchigh View Post
Many people go the 'high tech' route, where you're right... The priority is the plants. Most of us on this forum believe that the fish should come first. We add plants because there are plants in their native habitat, reduce wastes, and keep the water cleaner. Most of the fish we keep are 'forest fish', and there are lots of plants in the water, even if only short periods of the year.



I would encourage you to try an experiment one day. Check your survival rate of your fry, and then in a year or so raise fry in a heavily planted tank. The results would likely suprise you.
It really depends on the plant. Some, like ludwigea and hygrophila, send out fairly large root systems. Others, like hornwort and anarchis, will probably never root.



I would not use used pool filter sand, but new pool filter sand is okay. Sand can have risks (when it becomes too anaerobic due to compaction), but some people say it looks nicer and more natural. It's really preference. I prefer coarse sand/fine gravel myself. Of course, adding sand to gravel will probably not give you the look you expect.. The sand will sink and the gravel will sit on top after a while.
Good point!!!!!!
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Old 04-13-2011, 12:24 AM   #12
 
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I would encourage you to try an experiment one day. Check your survival rate of your fry, and then in a year or so raise fry in a heavily planted tank. The results would likely suprise you.
It really depends on the plant. Some, like ludwigea and hygrophila, send out fairly large root systems. Others, like hornwort and anarchis, will probably never root.
Survival rate? Back in the day, I had some 8 tanks, bred and raised live bearers - I never lost a fry as long as I got to them before some adult fish did. I think my fry success was likely related to no substrate, regular water changes and careful feeding. I doubt I'd see a difference with plants, however, I can see how plants have a positive buffer effect on eco-balance and water quality.


Quote:
Originally Posted by redchigh View Post
I would not use used pool filter sand, but new pool filter sand is okay. Sand can have risks (when it becomes too anaerobic due to compaction), but some people say it looks nicer and more natural. It's really preference. I prefer coarse sand/fine gravel myself. Of course, adding sand to gravel will probably not give you the look you expect.. The sand will sink and the gravel will sit on top after a while.
I was thinking that plants might root better in sand than gravel.
Not sure why 'used' pool sand would be bad? I mean, assuming it's cleaned, the only difference is that it's filter use has rounded it's edge so to speak, making it a less effective filtering medium.
In any event, I likely wouldn't use sand if plants don't prefer it...although I think it might look as good as natural gravel.
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Old 04-13-2011, 07:40 AM   #13
 
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Brad - I'm just 'spitballin' here, but why do you do 40% water changes vs. the more typical 20-25%?
Heck I dont really know, something I saw or read maybe. Maybe Byron said it was good I cant remember. Actually I do change it up, sometimes doing 40 sometimes 20 just depends on how the tank is looking. I also add the flourish after the water change. You should give live plants a try, its really cool and easy to do. After doing the low tech like Byron talks about im not sure why anyone would go the high tech route, unless you just have a lot of money you want to throw away on equipment! I currently keep one planted tank which is my main interest and the cichlid tank mentioned in the other thread. Love the cichlid fish but the planted tank is what all my friends are wowed about when they see it.
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Old 04-13-2011, 07:55 AM   #14
 
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Heck I dont really know, something I saw or read maybe. Maybe Byron said it was good I cant remember. Actually I do change it up, sometimes doing 40 sometimes 20 just depends on how the tank is looking. I also add the flourish after the water change. You should give live plants a try, its really cool and easy to do. After doing the low tech like Byron talks about im not sure why anyone would go the high tech route, unless you just have a lot of money you want to throw away on equipment! I currently keep one planted tank which is my main interest and the cichlid tank mentioned in the other thread. Love the cichlid fish but the planted tank is what all my friends are wowed about when they see it.
Probably changing that much doesn't cause harm as more is prolly better than less or none, but I'd think once things are stable, you could be more like 20-25% weekly, don't you think. Have you done any tests on the water? Just curious as I have yet to get a test kit so with the exception of SeaChem Ammonia alarms in both tanks, I'm sorta flying by the seat of my pants...but so far, with the possible exception of some enthusiastic algae in the 10g (on the side with the light), both tanks are doing very well.
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Old 04-13-2011, 08:08 AM   #15
 
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When I started out I tested my water all the time but since my planted tank has been established I havent picked up my API test kit. Although, after starting that new cichlid 60 the other day I have been tempted to do some testing but it seems to be turning the corner already with cleaner looking water and no fish losses. Its been months since my planted tank lost a fish, Id sort of like to buy fish but I dont have any need to! I also highly recommend doing a cichlid tank, the fish are beautiful and very hardy. I purchased all of them at petsmart on a 4 for 10 dollar sale and all of them survived with experimental tanks and the sort. Purchased 12 and now they are the $25 each size. Close as you can get to the salt water aquarium without the cost. Just dont mix rooted plants and cichlids these guys are roadgraders.
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Old 04-13-2011, 08:49 AM   #16
 
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When I started out I tested my water all the time but since my planted tank has been established I havent picked up my API test kit. Although, after starting that new cichlid 60 the other day I have been tempted to do some testing but it seems to be turning the corner already with cleaner looking water and no fish losses. Its been months since my planted tank lost a fish, Id sort of like to buy fish but I dont have any need to! I also highly recommend doing a cichlid tank, the fish are beautiful and very hardy. I purchased all of them at petsmart on a 4 for 10 dollar sale and all of them survived with experimental tanks and the sort. Purchased 12 and now they are the $25 each size. Close as you can get to the salt water aquarium without the cost. Just dont mix rooted plants and cichlids these guys are roadgraders.
I would love to have a couple of Angel fish and I will prolly try in my 60g (community tank) even though they're a bit borderline in a community when they get larger. I currently have (60g) 2 red wag platys, 2 sunset mickey mouse platys, 3 black mollies. In the 10g, I have 5 neon tetras (to move to the 60g soon) and of course some 20 red wag platy fry in a breeder net). Anyway, I think as the Angels get large, the neons might be seen as food! (dunno what to do about all the RW Platys, but my daughter is in love with them and the idea of growing baby fish)
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Old 04-13-2011, 11:30 AM   #17
 
Larger water changes are fine. I do 50% weekly on most of my tanks. All depends on the tank though.
One may need big changes others may not.
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