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Time to go External!

This is a discussion on Time to go External! within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Thanks for everyones input. You are correct Sin Crisis, on this particular project my focus is building around the aquascape. I'm going high tech ...

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Old 05-01-2012, 10:55 AM   #11
 
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Thanks for everyones input.

You are correct Sin Crisis, on this particular project my focus is building around the aquascape. I'm going high tech on it, guess it makes sense now why the recommendations for high flow and turnover. I wanted to use a schoal of neon Tetras as I always liked how they looked in high tech tanks but you're saying high flows not recommended for them? If not, which fish work well?
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Old 05-01-2012, 04:17 PM   #12
 
A high flow tank would be terrifying for slower moving fish like Neon Tetras. Additionally, most tetras prefer blackwater since the darker environment gives them some security. Aquascaping tanks require high water clarity and lots of light to really show off the colors of the plants and the contrasts between the plants and other decor.

However, this is not to say you cannot keep neon tetras, or other tetra species. Depending on your set-up, it is possible to keep them. Plants and decor will obstruct the flow of water and also create slow flow zones that your tetras will feel comfortable in. Depending on your setup and scape, your fish selection will vary. Also shade from plants will also offer the sense of security fish like tetras need.

For you, IMO, it might be better to first set up your high-tech tank and then look for stocking options. The fish profiles on this site will have most of the important info you need for fish you are interested in.
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Old 05-01-2012, 10:34 PM   #13
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SinCrisis View Post
A high flow tank would be terrifying for slower moving fish like Neon Tetras. Additionally, most tetras prefer blackwater since the darker environment gives them some security. Aquascaping tanks require high water clarity and lots of light to really show off the colors of the plants and the contrasts between the plants and other decor.

However, this is not to say you cannot keep neon tetras, or other tetra species. Depending on your set-up, it is possible to keep them. Plants and decor will obstruct the flow of water and also create slow flow zones that your tetras will feel comfortable in. Depending on your setup and scape, your fish selection will vary. Also shade from plants will also offer the sense of security fish like tetras need.

For you, IMO, it might be better to first set up your high-tech tank and then look for stocking options. The fish profiles on this site will have most of the important info you need for fish you are interested in.
Its true that neons prefer blackwater, but at the same time you always see Neon tetras in high tech tanks thriving in schoals... atleast thats what the picture displays, we can never put our mind in the fish..

With that said, I like to think ahead. I already got a 10gal with a schoal of neons, few cherry barbs and zebra danios.. I might have to re house some as I dont think most will prefer the high flow and as I said on this project i'm building around the scape. Its hard to go off what most keep because I don't think most think about that
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Old 05-01-2012, 11:11 PM   #14
 
I recently bought a fluval 106, just last week in fact. There was a sale on Big Al's online, was only 80$. I really liked how much mechanical filtration media is in there, much more than the eheim. Also there is quite a lot of place for bio media, had to buy a 500g pack of bio rings to fill the two trays, since I won't be using carbon and they don't give you that much bio media to start with (about half a tray). Maintenance is really easy with the quick disconnect hoses, easy prime handle and sturdy clamps to close the canister.

The current in my 26g is not strong. The way the outflow is positionned right now (facing the glass) I find that the downward flow is less than with the Fluval c3 HOB that was there before, the fish don't get pushed around so mush.

The thing I really appreciate right now is how quiet the filter is. way way way better than hob, it's quite unnerving at first, you think the filter is unplugged !

Last edited by Boise1024; 05-01-2012 at 11:14 PM..
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Old 05-02-2012, 09:45 AM   #15
 
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I tend to stay out of threads involving high-tech planted systems because it is not my method and I leave it for those with considerably more experience with it to offer advice. But in the last few posts a couple related issues have come up on which I would like to comment, namely filter flow and light.

I don't want to second guess SinCrisis, but by "blackwater" I would suggest he likely is referring to light. The majority of our soft water aquarium fish, what I call forest fish, do not do well under bright light longterm. They occur in shaded waters; in streams that do receive some direct sun they invariably are found in the shadows. There are physiological reasons for this, but suffice it to say that this is how nature made them and they will only be at their best condition if maintained in aquaria that tend to replicate this type of habitat. The effect of bright light on fish is explored here, if anyone is interested in more information:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...er-fish-81982/

Water flow is another cause of stress in fish. These same forest fish should never be maintained in tanks where they are forced to battle currents. Quite simply, it wears them out fast. And again it is not natural to their habitats. I have tanks where the length (4 and 5 feet) allows me to have stronger flow at one end, specifically for certain fish; it is no accident that the characins remain in the quieter areas of the tank...given the option, they easily choose their preference. With respect to the plants, these too do not need strong currents. There is botanical evidence out there to show that plants grow better (photosynthesize better) in moderate flow as opposed to strong flow, all else being equal.

Last comment for now on the remark that we see these fish thriving in tanks with bright lighting and currents. How do we know they are thriving? I would suggest they are not. The late Jacques Gery once wrote that when one provides the environment a species requires by nature, that fish will live its full lifespan. All of these issues that the fish is continually having to fight against cause it to burn out faster because it has not evolved for this environment. We cannot make nature suit our purposes, something that with all the environmental trouble facing us on this planet today we should have no trouble acknowledging.

Byron.
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Old 05-02-2012, 12:58 PM   #16
 
Blackwater does refer to light, but it also includes tannins in the water. Blackwater environments, to my understanding, are shaded tanks that have tannins that darken the water. The softness caused by the tannins and obscured light are more natural for fish like tetras and rasboras. Of course if your water is soft, you don't need the tannins and can do with just the shade.
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