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Sudden problems with anubias, swords, dwarf sag

This is a discussion on Sudden problems with anubias, swords, dwarf sag within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Originally Posted by redchigh Osmocote pellets are pretty much the same thing as the pellets I use in my tabs... I'd feel better covering ...

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Sudden problems with anubias, swords, dwarf sag
Old 12-30-2011, 03:12 PM   #11
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redchigh View Post
Osmocote pellets are pretty much the same thing as the pellets I use in my tabs... I'd feel better covering them in clay and gelatin to keep the copper from leaching out and killing my snails.
Sorry Op this has gotten off subject Redchigh, I am going to make a new thread "home made fertilizers"
I would love to hear your thoughts on the matter!
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Old 12-31-2011, 12:16 AM   #12
 
Ok now I'm not as worried :) it seems that the problems are making sense, except for why my anubias is getting bad still

What I meant was the plants were planted in dirt in pots, and I just dirted the tank itself this month. I added too much gravel and so when I took the plants out of the pots I couldn't get the roots down to the soil, and for some reason it just didn't occur to me until last night. So last night I took out half the gravel and was able to get all the roots down in the dirt. I have a little over an inch of dirt in there.

Also, last week (when I added my new plants), I reduced my fish stock. It went from more heavier stocked down to 10 tiiiny cardinal tetras, 2 small zamora cats, and 3 otos who all barely eat anything. I'll add my pearl gouramis tonight so I'll be able to feed more.

No I didn't bury my anubias, it's always been on rocks. Now it's all between rocks or wood. I have 1wpg T5NO, 1 is 6500k full spectrum the other is 10000k something. The giant anubias has barely any roots on it so I can't get it to the dirt.

As for buying all those different nutrients how do I get those? Do they come in liquid or powder form at lowes or something? Would I ask them where their K2SO4 is? Lol this is where I always get confused with plants. Though I would be interested to know how to do it myself as it seems it might be cheaper than buying the Flourish bottles of it? And that's ok Boredomb, I'm going to go read that board as I definitely need to learn more about homemade fertilizer
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Old 12-31-2011, 11:45 AM   #13
 
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Zorse as far as dry fertilizers I only seen them in powder form. Also I have no clue where you can buy them locally but here is a website I will probably get them from:
Planted Aquarium Fertilizer - Main, Main, Dry Fertilizers, Dry Fertilizers,

Now you can mix the powders into a liquid form and dose them that way if you like. Depending in you tank size will depend on how much you dose be it dry or liquid form.

I am thinking on the anubias it is a nutrient problem. I would dose what you have for now atleast once a week and see if that helps.
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Old 12-31-2011, 04:10 PM   #14
 
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To get back to your original question from post 1 (which I only came to today so that's why I haven't posted sooner), the issues I suspect are due to the light and the soil/clay. Before addressing this, a couple comments on more recent remarks.

Quote:
What I meant was the plants were planted in dirt in pots, and I just dirted the tank itself this month. I added too much gravel and so when I took the plants out of the pots I couldn't get the roots down to the soil, and for some reason it just didn't occur to me until last night. So last night I took out half the gravel and was able to get all the roots down in the dirt. I have a little over an inch of dirt in there.
This would not likely have any impact. Aquatic plants will grow exactly the same whatever the substrate, it makes no difference what the medium is (soil, gravel, sand) provided the nutrients are available as they come from the water.

Quote:
Also, last week (when I added my new plants), I reduced my fish stock. It went from more heavier stocked down to 10 tiiiny cardinal tetras, 2 small zamora cats, and 3 otos who all barely eat anything. I'll add my pearl gouramis tonight so I'll be able to feed more.
It is true that reducing the fish stock would reduce the waste and thus the organics, a major source of nutrients. But not to the extent of the major deterioration you described initially.

Quote:
No I didn't bury my anubias, it's always been on rocks. Now it's all between rocks or wood. I have 1wpg T5NO, 1 is 6500k full spectrum the other is 10000k something. The giant anubias has barely any roots on it so I can't get it to the dirt.
This issue with the Anubias (as you have described it) is the light, period. This species does not appreciate bright light, it grows best in shade either under overhanging plants or floating plants. Usually the formation of brush algae on the leaves is the first sign of excessive light intensity, but brush algae does not always appear in every aquarium, so that is not particularly indicative. But the yellow blotches is definitely light related. More on the light momentarily.

Quote:
As for buying all those different nutrients how do I get those? Do they come in liquid or powder form at lowes or something? Would I ask them where their K2SO4 is? Lol this is where I always get confused with plants. Though I would be interested to know how to do it myself as it seems it might be cheaper than buying the Flourish bottles of it? And that's ok Boredomb, I'm going to go read that board as I definitely need to learn more about homemade fertilizer
I won't get too involved in this aspect as I don't do this method of fertilization so others who do can help you. But there is a nutrient issue now that is probably causing the problem with the swords, and this will relate to any fertilization you use so I would resolve the first problem before creating another. And I believe it is the soil/clay.

Red clay is iron-enriched. And iron is a micro-nutrient, often mentioned casually as especially essential for Echinodorus species (swords), but not in the quantities many may think necessary. Iron is also a heavy metal, and all heavy metals are highly toxic to all life, animal/fish, plant and bacteria. It does not take too much iron to become toxic. Many years ago laterite was touted as a first layer under the gravel/sand, but over time it became clear that this didn't have all that much of an impact. Aside from iron as a micro-nutrient being included in most enriched substrates today, no one advocates laterite. Brown blotches on swords is almost always an excess of iron that kills the plant tissue. Plants "take up" toxins, including excess iron, copper, etc., and what they don't assimilate as nutrient they can sometimes store and dispose of, depending upon the plant and other factors; but if the toxin is at a level that is beyond the capability of the plant to handle it, it increases to the extent that it kills the leaf and then the plant.

Related to this is the amount of calcium in the tap water; do you know the GH of your tap water? Calcium is not a mineral usually contained in fertilizers simmply because most people have sufficient in the source water, and regular water changes cover this. But a shortage of calcium will lead to an excess of iron on its own, as iron enters the plant and replaces the calcium, or where the calcium should be when it is insufficient.

This nutrient issue will usually occur with soil substrates if you have not started with fairly basic clean non-enriched soil; it should never contain fertilizers of any kind, as these often will create toxic conditions that can be varied depending again upon what's in them. My suggestion would be to take the soil/clay substrate out and switch to regular fine gravel or sand, or an enriched substrate [these can have other issues though, that I won't go into here]. Experimenting with various fertilizer preparations may make things worse if the initial imbalance is not corrected.

Back to the light, you mention increasing it for stem plants; don't. You already have too much for some of your plants, and most stem plants will have no problem with the light you have. You have nearly twice the light intensity over your 29g that I have over mine, and I have no problems with swords, Anubias, Java Fern, Vallisneria, Pennywort in this tank. If you retain the present light, reducing the duration and ensuring there are floating plants may be sufficient to fix this aspect.

Hope this is of some help.

Byron.

Last edited by Byron; 12-31-2011 at 04:13 PM..
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