Striving fkr a cheap, hardy plant scape
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Beginner Planted Aquarium » Striving fkr a cheap, hardy plant scape

Striving fkr a cheap, hardy plant scape

This is a discussion on Striving fkr a cheap, hardy plant scape within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> I bout a 80 gallon tank off of craigslist for a really good deal. I have a 10 gal right now and everything in ...

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Striving fkr a cheap, hardy plant scape
Old 06-02-2010, 01:12 PM   #1
 
Striving fkr a cheap, hardy plant scape

I bout a 80 gallon tank off of craigslist for a really good deal. I have a 10 gal right now and everything in it will go into the 80. The 10 gal has some sort of ludwiga and some spiral Val. I really want to try and spend the least ammount of $ possible. I'm looking for sugestions on inexpensive hardy plants to fill my tank with. The dimensions are 48" long 24" high 14" deep.
Posted via Mobile Device
outpost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2010, 06:13 PM   #2
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Most of the common aquarium plants will do well provided the light and nutrients are in balance. This answers the hardy part of the question. The cost depends upon where you are, what stores are there, or if you order online, etc.

If you can provide information on the light you have (presumably fluorescent, so what exactly is printed on the tube end) and your water parameters, and what fish you intend, I could offer some suggestions for suitable plants.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2010, 07:42 PM   #3
 
The light that came with the tank is a 36" 25 watt 10,000k bulb. I know that my waters pH is 8 and it's on the hard side but I don't know the exact number. I would love to have angelfish clown loaches and all of the little community fish. Possibly a gold or green severum. Are plants less online? What's a good store? I'm pretty sure I'm going to use pool filter sand and will try to find the darkest kind I can. I will aslo use seachem flourish for feet most likely.
Posted via Mobile Device
outpost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2010, 09:24 PM   #4
 
xrayjeeper83's Avatar
 
You can go check out your LFS. I just stopped by a new one 2 days ago and while talking with her she started pulling out some smaller plants, and breaking off stuff that was over grown. She through them all into a bag and handed it to me and said here take this saves me from just wasting it all. Gave me enough to plant my 55 fairly well(will look really good when its grown in)
xrayjeeper83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 12:26 PM   #5
 
eileen's Avatar
 
Tropical Fish clubs Resources Guide

I would try to find a Tropical fish club in your area or near you. I joined one in my area and It was cheap to join and they have mini auctions before the meetings, a speaker of fish related topics, a raffle afterwards. 2 big auctions in the spring and fall. I was able to get some really nice plants for $1 a bag. Alot cheaper then the LFS and great prices on fish also and aquarium supplies. Here is the Link:

http://www.tfhmagazine.com/resources/clubs/
eileen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 01:14 PM   #6
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by outpost View Post
The light that came with the tank is a 36" 25 watt 10,000k bulb. I know that my waters pH is 8 and it's on the hard side but I don't know the exact number. I would love to have angelfish clown loaches and all of the little community fish. Possibly a gold or green severum. Are plants less online? What's a good store? I'm pretty sure I'm going to use pool filter sand and will try to find the darkest kind I can. I will also use seachem flourish for feet most likely.
Posted via Mobile Device
The fish you mention are generally soft acidic water fish. Some, such as angels, are commercially tank-raised now, so they adapt (to some extent) to harder water. Without knowing the exact hardness number I can't offer much more on this; your water supply company/board should tell you the hardness of the water (it may be posted on their website), both general and carbonate hardness if possible. The latter determines how much the pH may lower over time and this is important too.

With the fish you mention a dark substrate is good. Sand is one option, I prefer smallest-grain gravel for planted tanks, but that's up to you. Sand has the compaction problem that takes a bit more care to avoid.

The light is a bit heavy on the blue side (the 10000K indicates this) so you might want to consider a full spectrum or daylight tube, around 6500K. This balances the blue and red with a bit of green for good plant growth and good colour rendition of fish and plants. The one you have will probably get you started OK though, I'm just thinking long-term.

As subsequent members have suggested, there are ways to get cheap plants aside from actually buying them in stores or online. Most of the available plants should manage for you. You can check out the plant profiles on this forum for some ideas.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 06:05 PM   #7
 
thanks byron.
All of the LFS carry all the popular tetras and softer water fish. I can't imagine that they soften all the water in the whole store. If the LFS has it in their water do you think I will be able to?
outpost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 06:46 PM   #8
 
Austin's Avatar
 
Hey there,

Lot's of plants grow pretty good and look nice. I find a lot of cryptocorenes (I know that's spelled wrong) do well for me and I have hard water with PH around 8. Anubias is doing well too. I heard things like pennywort, amazon swords, vallsneria, and quite a few others are decently hardy. I also know java fern and java moss are hardy.

Like I said my PH is about as hard as yours. I've had angelfish for about 5 years now and 3 of the current ones I have are babies from a pair that started breeding. 2 of those 3 have paired and and laid eggs a couple of weeks ago. For a bit I thought it might be best to get something to hook onto the faucet to make RO water, but it seems my angelfish are actually doing ok. So if you can find some raised and adapted to hard water I think they will be ok.

Also I'd like to say sweetaquatics is very cheap and I got about 12 plants for 20$, (30$ with shipping), which is a great deal when sword plants are about 4-5$ at the store (approx $1.50 at sweetaquatics for the small - which is BIGGER than pet store swords!!!!) and such. So that's a great website for plants! :D Everyone comes healthy as well. And they will include MTS if you ask for free! :D

Last edited by Austin; 06-03-2010 at 06:50 PM..
Austin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 06:51 PM   #9
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by outpost View Post
thanks byron.
All of the LFS carry all the popular tetras and softer water fish. I can't imagine that they soften all the water in the whole store. If the LFS has it in their water do you think I will be able to?
That's difficult to say, not knowing their water parameters or yours. Many of the fish stores in Vancouver adjust their water to around neutral (pH 7.0) in order to be able to comfortably maintain the wide-ranging fish types from soft and acidic to basic and harder. It would depend upon what, if anything, your fish store does in this regard, and of course if they even have the same water as you do [pH can vary from area to area with the same water source, it does here in Metro Vancouver, some areas have pH of 6.8 out of the tap, others 7.5, I have 7.0-7.2]. Also, perhaps even more importantly, is the water that the fish were raised in. Obviously wild caught fish will "adapt" for short periods but long term will develop internal problems. Commercially raised fish can be raised in quite different water parameters depending upon where they are farmed. For instance, common Rams raised in South Florida are accustomed to basic harder water, where those commercially raised in SE Asia are accustomed to soft acidic water, and wild caught from SA to very soft acidic water.

As one example, cardinal tetras are widely available everywhere. Most are wild caught, though there are commercial breeders appearing now. These fish do not tolerate hard basic water; they occur in blackwater and whitewater streams with near zero hardness (usually it is so low it can't be measured) and pH from 4-6. They last a few months, or a couple years if lucky, in harder water, but develop calcium blockages of the kidneys and various other issues and generally do not live long in aquaria for this reason. Those who maintain them in soft acidic water have them live for more than 10 years.

I would question your regular local stores and find out what, if anything, they do in this area, and if you are contemplating some of the sensitive species, find out where they get them.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 07:15 PM   #10
 
redchigh's Avatar
 
That comment about the LFS is a bit confusing...
Oh, I get it. You're under the impression that LFS actually take care of their fish!

Most don't know or else don't care, you shouldn't assume anything based on a LFS.

As far as online, I reccomend Sweetaquatics.com
redchigh is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SCAPE SoCali Plant Club monthly meets 3rd sunday of the month mgamer20o0 Aquarium Clubs and Events 0 12-14-2009 02:44 AM
Help with plant scape MoneyMitch Beginner Planted Aquarium 4 10-22-2009 08:06 PM
hardy fish fishluver06 Freshwater and Tropical Fish 7 06-24-2008 08:21 PM
how hardy are puffers? Enzo Ancient Fish 1 05-08-2007 02:14 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:57 AM.