Some Advantages To Growing Duckweed - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 14 Old 06-16-2013, 09:48 AM
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Given how easy many of the invasive floating plants grow, and at such a rapid rate, I feel like if it was tasty and worthwhile, we'd already be doing it.
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post #12 of 14 Old 06-16-2013, 10:06 AM
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Given how easy many of the invasive floating plants grow, and at such a rapid rate, I feel like if it was tasty and worthwhile, we'd already be doing it.
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My thought as well... except it's not actually tasty anyway, so that makes it far less likely.

Jeff.


Total years fish keeping experience: 7 months, can't start counting in years for a while yet.

The shotgun approach to a planted tank with an LED fixture

Small scale nitrogen cycle with a jar, water and fish food; no substrate, filter etc
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post #13 of 14 Old 06-16-2013, 12:32 PM
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Exactly.. Which is probably why we aren't already doing it.
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post #14 of 14 Old 06-16-2013, 02:00 PM
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I see that it is used for fodder but would have never really considered it a product for human consumption... especially not out of an aquarium. Purpose grown in appropriate setups, sure. Seeing as it is a great sink for ammonia, nitrates and metals I would be hesitant to use it from anywhere that it is exposed to uncontrolled source water or an overstocked aquarium.... I think that has already been mentioned though.

I have a jug going that is plants only, and duckweed is the largest portion making up close to 99% of the plant material.

Ever the one to experiment, I took out some, rinsed it well and had a taste. I made sure that it was the smaller leafed that were green on both sides, some turn red or brown.

I expected it to have that "green" flavour, something like bean sprouts (which I hate BTW) or perhaps a little metallic flavour similar to a seaweed, without all the saltiness, so I was surprised to find that it was mostly tasteless and didn't remind me of any plant I have ever eaten. I wasn't quite as tough as I expected either, almost a brittle crunchiness.

Experiment over and not to be repeated. Our salads include things like kale, romaine lettuce, lots of fresh vegetables, seeds, seaweeds and fresh herbs... duckweed is certainly not needed.

Jeff.
If you start hanging out around ponds, and quacking then we know duckweed shouldn't be eaten by humans
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duckweed , fingerling , food , high protein , tilapia

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