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Seachem purigen in a planted tank?

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Seachem purigen in a planted tank?
Old 01-17-2012, 05:46 PM   #11
 
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I honestly can't see the difference in those two videos. I'm not at all sure what you are considering as cloudiness.

There is a vast difference between clean water and clear water; the two are not synonymous. Water can be perfectly clean but not be clear, and vice-versa. I am after clean water, as that is the only thing that matters to the health of the fish. And this is where I have to question the wisdom of using these products, when they claim:
Purigen® generally ignores simple elemental compounds, having an extreme affinity for nitrogenous organics. The primary source of nitrogenous compounds in an aquarium is waste. Fish, corals, even plants produce nitrogenous waste. Purigen® removes that waste faster and more completely than anything else on the market.
No one can question the fact that by their own admission, this product is messing with the natural bacteria and biological equilibrium in the aquarium.

My tanks also happen to be clear--at least they are when I am wearing my specs.
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Old 01-17-2012, 06:14 PM   #12
 
in the same branch as this I was wondering about Seachem. CupriSorb
Cuprisorb seems to remove heavy metals from water would that have a negative effect on plants?
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Old 01-17-2012, 06:55 PM   #13
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
I honestly can't see the difference in those two videos. I'm not at all sure what you are considering as cloudiness.
Maybe this will help to clarify what I'm talking about. Here are a couple pictures of my tank:





I wouldn't consider my tank "cloudy", but it definitely isn't crystal clear either. Here you can clearly see the roughly triangular patch of milky water right below my light, as well as my serpaes hamming it up for the camera. (the white specs in the background of the front view are actually on the wallpaper behind the tank, by the way) Again, I wouldn't consider this a cloudy tank, and I would expect it to clear up even more so as I do water changes and such, but I have never seen a tank without this happening to some degree.. until I learned about purigen and decided to look into it. If the water were truly crystal clear, there would be no light beams because there is absolutely nothing suspended in the water that reflects light.

I understand the difference between clean and clear, but I don't see why I shouldn't strive for both. If I was only concerned about providing a healthy habitat for fish, I would be keeping them in a much cheaper plastic bin instead of a glass aquarium. I'm going to try it, and I'll be sure to talk about any issues or concerns that might come up, and of course post before and after pictures if I see results.

In case you're curious, my water parameters are: pH 6.4, dkH between 1 and 2 (I have pretty soft water), ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate all 0. I just tested. So it's not because my tank is having cycling issues.
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Old 01-17-2012, 07:46 PM   #14
 
if you have 0 nitrate then you surely have cycling problems :( there is supposed to be nitrate in your water !
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Old 01-17-2012, 08:13 PM   #15
 
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That would be true, except my tank is roughly 1/3 stocked right now, so I've always assumed that my plants are using the ammonia/nitrate before it has a chance to accumulate. I had a tiny ammonia spike (about .25) the day after I set the tank up (the entire filter was taken from a cycled tank) and since then I've seen no trace of any of the three.
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Old 01-17-2012, 08:58 PM   #16
 
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I agree, that is a bit cloudy, and that is a bacterial issue, no question. How long as the tank been running? My 115g took close to 4 months to clear and it was a bit cloudier than yours, but now it is clear. I no longer see any light entering the tank. I want clear water too, but I want it to occur and remain without my having to spend money on chemicals that carry other issues.

I'm going to jump in with my suggestions, you are of course free to ignore them. My tanks are crystal clear except when new, or if I get a bacterial bloom (of sorts). [And my one water conditioner causes this for a day, I am not going to get more of it.] The substrate needs time to develop the bacteria colony that is essential. Rather than flog all that, please have a read of this, I think it will explain why:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...quarium-74891/
And establishing the substrate biological stability is still the best way to deal with this. Anything else is just band-aiding; it will probably work, but in doing so it will delay the natural establishment of a healthy substrate.

You need a few more plants, and particularly some floating plants. The fish will appreciate them, plus they help with this issue because they are fast growing.

Byron.
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Old 01-17-2012, 09:06 PM   #17
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maxillius View Post
in the same branch as this I was wondering about Seachem. CupriSorb
Cuprisorb seems to remove heavy metals from water would that have a negative effect on plants?
I would never use this in a planted tank. Water conditioners are bad enough at removing trace minerals, but at least they give out after 24-48 hours; this stuff is permanent. I don't think there can be much doubt that plants would not last with this. Copper and several other heavy metals (iron, zinc, manganese, nickel) are essential trace elements for plants.

I corresponded with the scientist at Seachem about water conditioners that detoxify heavy metals, in planted tanks, and he agreed that this was detrimental. He also noted that such conditioners (including their Prime) would negate plant fertilizers like Flourish by detoxifying the trace minerals. His advice was to wait 24-36 hours after a water change before dosing with Flourish or any trace minerals.

Stay away from this stuff; it is likely meant for someone who may be on well water with high amounts of heavy metals which would kill many fish. Tap water would not have such high levels as it is monitored for public health. Though the levels allowed for some minerals, such as copper, can kill fish. But any conditioner that detoxifies heavy metals will handle these still-trace amounts. And plants will take up toxic metals at that level.

Byron.
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Old 01-19-2012, 05:09 PM   #18
 
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Personally I like a little bit of a tinge to the water, I think it makes it look more natural but that's just me. As an example I love the brown/yellow tannins from the driftwood, the leaching is starting to slow down and the water is getting more clear now, I'm half tempted to put a new small piece of Malaysian wood in there just for the tannins. Not that any of that has anything to do with Purigen but I'm with Byron on this one, clean water is the top priority with the level of clarity being a personal aesthetic issue. For me, having sparkling clear water at the expense of unnecessary chemical involvement, regardless of how "safe" or minimal, is not worth it. Most of these fish don't come from crystal clear water and they do just fine. Leave nature alone.
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Old 04-03-2013, 10:37 AM   #19
 
I would have to agree with Byron here. Purigen doesn't do anything that a well planted tank with regular water changes can do.
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Old 04-03-2013, 11:17 AM   #20
 
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I have one tank 80 U.S. gallon's that ran for a year heavily planted without the use of Purigen.
Same tank has now been running for nearly a year with Purigen.
I am particular about what I wish to view in my tank's with respect to clarity and have seen no negative effect from using the Purigen BUT,, I also add dry fertilizer's in the form of inorganic mineral salt's.
Perhap's the weekly addition of fertz negates any negative effect's from Purigen.
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