Seachem Flourish vs Tropica Plant Nutrition + - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
View Poll Results: Seachem Flourish vs Tropica Plant Nutrition +
Seachem Flourish 4 100.00%
Tropica Plant Nutrition + 0 0%
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post #1 of 18 Old 09-04-2010, 01:58 PM Thread Starter
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Seachem Flourish vs Tropica Plant Nutrition +

Which one do you think is the best?
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post #2 of 18 Old 09-04-2010, 04:19 PM
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When considering this question, one also must consider the amount required. Not only from the cost perspective, but adding "stuff" to a fish tank should preferably be minimal to achieve the goal.

One-half a teaspoon, or 2.5 ml, of Flourish Comprehensive treats 30g. It can be used once or twice a week (this is determined by the response of the plants in relation to the light, fish load, water parameters).

According to Tom Barr, the botanist who formulated the EI (Estimated Index) system of fertilizing high-tech tanks, Tropica worked well when he used 5ml for a 20g tank three times each week. That's roughly six times as much as Flourish. Now, I don't know how "planted" Tom's tank was, but he considered my tanks (from photos) were lush and thriving, and I have been using Flourish twice a week for almost two years.

The other issue that enters into any such comparison is the type of planted tank; low-tech requires less, high-tech considerably more in the way of additional nutrients.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #3 of 18 Old 09-04-2010, 04:26 PM Thread Starter
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It will be high tech

pressurized co2, ph controller, co2 reactor, will be heavily planted and fully stocked with fish.

Now i am also considering TPN instead of the TPN+ since i will have nitrogen and phosphate from fish.

Seachem Flourish does have nitrogen and phosphate.
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post #4 of 18 Old 09-05-2010, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by migdem View Post
It will be high tech

pressurized co2, ph controller, co2 reactor, will be heavily planted and fully stocked with fish.

Now i am also considering TPN instead of the TPN+ since i will have nitrogen and phosphate from fish.

Seachem Flourish does have nitrogen and phosphate.
Actually, Flourish does have nitrogen and phosphate. Check the ingredients here:
Seachem. Flourish

I have so far not come across any other product that has all necessary nutrients; the only two missing are oxygen (obvious why that isn't included) and nickel. I know of no preparation containing nickel, so either it is sufficient from somewhere (?) or it is not crucial.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #5 of 18 Old 09-05-2010, 12:15 PM Thread Starter
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Ok so I will try and get the Seachem Flourish. Also in heavily planted and fully stocked fish I should fertilize twice a week or more? Also how much ml should i dose for 450 litre tank?
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post #6 of 18 Old 09-05-2010, 01:02 PM
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Ok so I will try and get the Seachem Flourish. Also in heavily planted and fully stocked fish I should fertilize twice a week or more? Also how much ml should i dose for 450 litre tank?
On the amount of each dose, follow the label; if you're thinking Flourish, 2.5 ml (= 1/2 a teaspoon) does 30g. Don't overdose as some micro nutrients (iron, copper, manganese...) are heavy metals, though it would take a fiar bit to "overdose."

Once or twice a week depens upon the plants, fish, parameters, light and using CO2. This is all relative within each aquarium. I've no personal experience with CO2 being added so I wouldn't hesitate a guess on frequency.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #7 of 18 Old 09-05-2010, 01:04 PM Thread Starter
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Ok will start the normal dose weekly if i see if this is not enough I will add twice weekly. How do you know if the plants need more ferts?
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post #8 of 18 Old 09-05-2010, 01:13 PM
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Ok will start the normal dose weekly if i see if this is not enough I will add twice weekly. How do you know if the plants need more ferts?
Observe their appearance. If leaves start yellowing or browning, normally it means lack of sufficient nutrients. This is how I got to my twice a week Flourish; 3 times over the course of a year I reduced it to once a week, and each time within 1-2 weeks the larger leaves on the swords started yellowing. I increased Flourish to twice a week, and within 1-2 weeks yellowing stopped. Once leaves start to yellow they never recover, so don't expect partly-yellow leaves to turn green again.

Algae is another guide; if it begins to increase beyond "normal" [and before you ask, "normal" is relative to each aquarium] light needs to be reduced, not nutrients. Light should be the limiting factor in plant growth, otherwise algae will always take advantage.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #9 of 18 Old 09-05-2010, 01:15 PM Thread Starter
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So if algae start i reduce time of lights and then should I ever increase timing. I am going to start with 10 hours light per day. 216W T5 for 450 litres.
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post #10 of 18 Old 09-05-2010, 03:04 PM
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So if algae start i reduce time of lights and then should I ever increase timing. I am going to start with 10 hours light per day. 216W T5 for 450 litres.

Normally 12 hours is recommended with CO2. But if nutrients are not sufficient to balance the light, this could be too much light. Again, this is not easy to predict, because so many factors play into the equation.

Remember that algae will always be present; only when it obviously shows signs of becoming excessive should light then be reduced, and duration usually first. An hour can make a lot of difference. I went from 12 to 11 hours last year and algae slowed considerably. I still have algae of varing types, but it is not smothering the plant leaves.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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