Removing algea from live plant leaves/ Good algea eating fish
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Beginner Planted Aquarium » Removing algea from live plant leaves/ Good algea eating fish

Removing algea from live plant leaves/ Good algea eating fish

This is a discussion on Removing algea from live plant leaves/ Good algea eating fish within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Hi all, so my 5.5 shrimp tank is still cycling, Nitrite is spiking now 2.0ppm, ammonia .25ppm, nitrate 5.0ppm. PH 6.8. I'm starting to ...

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Removing algea from live plant leaves/ Good algea eating fish
Old 02-06-2012, 08:07 PM   #1
 
Tetra Guy's Avatar
 
Removing algea from live plant leaves/ Good algea eating fish

Hi all, so my 5.5 shrimp tank is still cycling, Nitrite is spiking now 2.0ppm, ammonia .25ppm, nitrate 5.0ppm. PH 6.8.

I'm starting to notice stringy green algae on my plant leaves. I'm wondering how to remove it? Hopefully the shrimp will eat it once the tank is cycled. I'm afraid its gonna suffocate my leaves. Suggestions?

Should I get an algae eating fish? If so what would be a good one appropriate for a 5.5 gallon. I have 6 White Cloud Mountain Minnows in there now. They don't seem to eat algae.
Tetra Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2012, 08:09 PM   #2
 
Nitrite and ammoia levels are toxic. Dont put any more fish in there, it will just add more food for the algae anyhow. Try buying a new toothbrush, rinse it off with tap water then gently brushing the leaves of the plant.
ladayen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2012, 08:27 PM   #3
 
Tetra Guy's Avatar
 
Wouldn't a toothbrush mutilate the leaves? I know, levels are toxic, damn! Does anything about the levels sound wrong to you at this point? It's been cycling for over a month now.
Tetra Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2012, 01:02 PM   #4
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Ladayen has a good tip; use a "soft" grade toothbrush, and very gently. The algae will likely stick to the toothbrush and twirl off, rather than you actually scraping it which would damage leaves.

Reduce the light, lessen the duration if intensity is not too much (you haven't said). Algae occurs from light. As for fish, you don't have space for more fish with 6 minnows in a 5g. Shrimp and snails can help. Initially the water is not stable in a new tank and algae takes advantage. Once the tank is established this should be less of a problem.

On those numbers, nitrite can't possibly be five or the minnows would be dead. Did you mean 0.5 ppm? That is bad enough; any ammonia or nitrite above zero should require a partial water change (half the tank) when fish are present. Use a conditioner like Prime or Ultimate, both of which will detoxify ammonia and nitrite; with these you can do alternate day changes until the levels are zero.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 11:41 PM   #5
 
Tetra Guy's Avatar
 
Thank you Bryon. The light is on a timer, set for 9.5 hours a day. I reduced it to 8.5 hours. I plan on putting shrimp and snails in this tank. I'm going to remove the minnows. But as you can see, the tank is not ready for the shrimp or snails yet.

I have duckweed on the surface of this tank. I'm waiting for my Hornwort to come in. Hopefully it will help diffuse the light, as the duckweed hasn't taken over my tank, like many claim.
Tetra Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 11:53 PM   #6
 
Tetra Guy's Avatar
 
Ok, so i just inspected my light. It's a 16" (15" light) T8 8,000K. On the light fixture it says 32 watt, but on the fluorescent tube itself, it says 14w. Aren't those suppose to match? Is this light to intense? Wow, it never ends!
Tetra Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 07:09 AM   #7
 
Lupin's Avatar
 
A lot of fast growing plants are advantageous since they can deprive thw algae of nutrients as well. By the way, if you do end up woth snails, I would not worry about them. Some such as ramshorns are quite useful in eating algae and decaying plant parts. Trumpet snails burrow around. This is also advantageous since they help minimize anaerobic spots around the substrate.
Lupin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 10:28 AM   #8
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetra Guy View Post
Ok, so i just inspected my light. It's a 16" (15" light) T8 8,000K. On the light fixture it says 32 watt, but on the fluorescent tube itself, it says 14w. Aren't those suppose to match? Is this light to intense? Wow, it never ends!
Watts is frankly irrelevant. The tube should be OK. Tubes need replacing, every 12 months is advisable. Who is the manufacturer? I might be able to track it down to see if this or something else when it needs replacing would be best.

And Lupin has given very good advice, I concur.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 11:08 AM   #9
 
Tetra Guy's Avatar
 
The fluorescent tube is stamped Aqueon. The light fixture says All Glass Aquariums Inc.
Tetra Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 11:52 AM   #10
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetra Guy View Post
The fluorescent tube is stamped Aqueon. The light fixture says All Glass Aquariums Inc.
I like All Glass fixtures, I bought two to replace old ones a couple years ago.

The existing tube may be fine, but when it comes time to replace it (12 months) I would get a full spectrum with a Kelvin around 6500K.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Algea help - what algea cleaners do you use saulat Beginner Planted Aquarium 20 06-08-2013 01:08 AM
A Good algea eater jeppun21 Freshwater and Tropical Fish 13 06-01-2011 01:54 PM
Good algea eating fish. tran2255 Freshwater and Tropical Fish 21 04-21-2008 06:59 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:15 PM.