Re-Aquascaping AGIAN!!!
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Beginner Planted Aquarium » Re-Aquascaping AGIAN!!!

Re-Aquascaping AGIAN!!!

This is a discussion on Re-Aquascaping AGIAN!!! within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> ok soo.... my planted tank called royal Royal - 10 gallon Freshwater fish tank i think looks awesome. Now this profile is not updated ...

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Re-Aquascaping AGIAN!!!
Old 11-19-2011, 10:29 AM   #1
 
Blaxicanlatino's Avatar
 
Re-Aquascaping AGIAN!!!

ok soo.... my planted tank called royal Royal - 10 gallon Freshwater fish tank i think looks awesome. Now this profile is not updated but its far more bushier than the latest pic in that profile. Well for some reason, the plants have not being doing so well. I dose the tank with about 8 drops of flourish comprehensive once a week after a 25% water change that is also done once a week.

I have many more cherry shrimp. Im thinking about taking out all of the tall plants, the red ludwigia, the wallachii, the rotala, and the unkown green plant in the middle. Moving the crypt plants more in the center of the tank. Putting large stones in the tank, maybe about 2 or 3. Then having red water lillies surrounding the island of crypts then having glossostigma or dwarf water clovers, or dwarf baby tears as the grass.

Do you think this would be good? The tank has 2, 15 watt bulbs for a total of 3o watts. and it is a 10 gallon.

Sound good?

And yes i spelled it as "AGIAN"
Thanks :D
Blaxicanlatino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2011, 10:38 AM   #2
 
Blaxicanlatino's Avatar
 
Ok heres a pic i took like 2 months ago. Horrible pic and the red wallichii is gone and replaced with more rotala and red ludwigia (trimmed them and replanted them). Hate the way the tank looks right now, that mysterious plant in the middle which grew incredibly is no longer growing and the red ludwigia has green spots on the leaves
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Royal 08-31-2011.jpg (47.3 KB, 50 views)
Blaxicanlatino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2011, 10:56 AM   #3
 
Blaxicanlatino's Avatar
 
For the carpet, what should i use? Im thinking either glossostigma or dwarf hairgrass. There is not excel nor no2 injection
Blaxicanlatino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2011, 03:39 PM   #4
 
Byron's Avatar
 
I would tend to think that CO2 is the limiting factor, but I also don't see evidence of algae which I would expect if light and other nutrients exceeded the available CO2 to any degree. [And the plants look fine to me]. I assume you do not touch the substrate (no vacuuming), as that is the main source of CO2.

As for carpet plants, some have managed those you mention in small tanks with no CO2, so you might give it a try.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2011, 03:43 PM   #5
 
redchigh's Avatar
 
I would lean towards the hairgrass... Glosso can work, but I wouldn't. Marsilea Crenata looks similiar to glosso though, and is a bit easier....
redchigh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2011, 03:45 PM   #6
 
Calmwaters's Avatar
 
Are you waiting at least 24 hours after the water change to add your ferts?
Calmwaters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2011, 03:46 PM   #7
 
Blaxicanlatino's Avatar
 
well i have hundreds of malaysian trumpet snails and possibly some hundred of cherry shrimps so thats where i see co2 coming from. Also i only have those algae rings on the red ludwigia and a tiny bit on the LEFT side of the glass of the tank
Blaxicanlatino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2011, 03:55 PM   #8
 
Blaxicanlatino's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calmwaters View Post
Are you waiting at least 24 hours after the water change to add your ferts?
I try to. But not always
Blaxicanlatino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2011, 04:24 PM   #9
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blaxicanlatino View Post
well i have hundreds of malaysian trumpet snails and possibly some hundred of cherry shrimps so thats where i see co2 coming from. Also i only have those algae rings on the red ludwigia and a tiny bit on the LEFT side of the glass of the tank
The amount of CO2 occurring from invertebrates is so low as to be insignificant. The majority (by far) of the CO2 in any natural (low-tech) fish tank occurs from the substrate, not the fish and invertebrates. This is why the substrate should not be cleaned; the organics get broken down by snails and bacteria, and a lot of CO2 is released during this continual process. Of course, if you vacuum the substrate and remove the waste, you are lessening the CO2 significantly.

This is why soil substrates have become "fashionable." Their only benefit is to provide more organics for a higher level of CO2. Not suggesting you go to soil; I don't consider the mess and other possible issues worth it, but my point is that the CO2 occurring from the breakdown of organics in any substrate is vital. I have grown plants in fish-less tanks with the only source of CO2 coming from the organics in the gravel.

You can read more here:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...quarium-74891/
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2011, 04:35 PM   #10
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
The amount of CO2 occurring from invertebrates is so low as to be insignificant. The majority (by far) of the CO2 in any natural (low-tech) fish tank occurs from the substrate, not the fish and invertebrates. This is why the substrate should not be cleaned; the organics get broken down by snails and bacteria, and a lot of CO2 is released during this continual process. Of course, if you vacuum the substrate and remove the waste, you are lessening the CO2 significantly.

This is why soil substrates have become "fashionable." Their only benefit is to provide more organics for a higher level of CO2. Not suggesting you go to soil; I don't consider the mess and other possible issues worth it, but my point is that the CO2 occurring from the breakdown of organics in any substrate is vital. I have grown plants in fish-less tanks with the only source of CO2 coming from the organics in the gravel.

You can read more here:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...quarium-74891/
So you're saying that you shouldn't vacuum the gravel during water changes in a planted tank? Don't you eventually need to remove some of the waste in the gravel?
hywaydave is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I need some help with Aquascaping... fattail95 Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 7 11-09-2010 05:42 PM
re aquascaping newby30gallon Beginner Saltwater Aquariums 9 03-13-2010 10:26 AM
Need Help Aquascaping! x2fast4everyone Beginner Planted Aquarium 4 01-18-2010 04:29 PM
Aquascaping Howl52 Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 12 04-15-2007 08:32 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:37 PM.