questions of light and nutrients - Page 3
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Beginner Planted Aquarium » questions of light and nutrients

questions of light and nutrients

This is a discussion on questions of light and nutrients within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Originally Posted by Chesherca Thanks again! Yes, my water is soft, and for now there are now only 2 fish (Mollies) in that tank. ...

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
questions of light and nutrients
Old 03-08-2012, 10:47 AM   #21
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chesherca View Post
Thanks again! Yes, my water is soft, and for now there are now only 2 fish (Mollies) in that tank. Not planning on any new additions for another month or two, so I'll give the plants a bit more after 3 days have past, and see what there is to see from there! I'm so glad to have found people who know things! I'd be lost without all of your help!
How soft? Molly will not do well in soft water. Like all livebearers, they need medium hard or harder water, and a pH above 7. Molly are especially susceptible to problems from soft water and will not last long-term.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Byron For This Useful Post:
Chesh (03-11-2012)
Old 03-08-2012, 10:57 PM   #22
 
Chesh's Avatar
 
Ug... you're right, I know! Working on it. . . my water is soft. . . GH: 89.5 KH: 53.7 SOOOOOOOOFT Ph is 7.4, so at least I'm in the range with that.

Please be patient with me, I'm trying to learn EVERYTHING I possibly can about fish-keeping all at once! I started 3 weeks ago by giving in to the innocent request of my 2-year old, and came home with a sorted bag of fish from the pet-store - ground ZERO. I'm doing as much as I can to learn as quickly as I can to make the world a better place for ALL the new life-forms under my care. Doing very well so far, considering. Already running 2 tanks with 0 ammonia and 0 nitrItes, nitrAtes are falling fast and down to 10 in both tanks. The cycling was my first concern, now I'm working on fixing all of the rest of it as I can. Fish have been moved here, frogs there. . . as of yesterday the Mollies are now all alone in the big tank. Now that that's all been done we can think about adding salt and dealing with the hardness of the water. I just wish someone had TOLD me ANY of this before I left the pet shop! There really should be a law - at the very least requiring them to have documentation about the cycling process up in every shop that sells fish. . . *growls* So much to learn simultaneously! I've been spending a lot of time trying to wrap my brain around Kh and Gh and Ph and how they all work together and effect each-other. I've read your articles about 100 times along with many others on the subject. I still feel as though I'm missing something to TRULY understand it (I suspect I need more of a foundation in the sciences in general), but that doesn't really matter. I know it's true. I don't want to hurt my mollies. . . I'm working on it :)

But that's neither here nor there. The GOOD news is that at least the PLANT situation is under control! Needed the plants to get the accidental fish-in cycle done as safely as possible. Plants are living, too, and thus need to be cared for properly. Would be a shame to kill them after they saved my fish! The cycling situation is looking up. And the frog situation. . . his new 5g tank is cycling right now, and at least this time I have some bacteria from my other tanks to seed it with to get that process done more quickly and get him settled in. I'm setting things straight as quickly as I can!

Your advice, and the advice of others I've found on this forum, has been the only thing that saved my fish (and frog), I can't thank you all enough. I'm finding this underwater world incredibly fascinating and far more complicated than I had ever dreamed. I really LIKE it, and am fairly sure I'm here to stay :)

Last edited by Chesh; 03-08-2012 at 11:11 PM..
Chesh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2012, 10:07 AM   #23
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Sounding good. My suggestion would be to have only livebearers in the tank with the molly. This makes it easy to prepare good water. And the best and least expensive way to do that is with crushed coral/aragonite blend gravel. CarribSea make it, or you can get other brands. Another option is crushed limestone that you may find at landscape or gardening places--just make sure it is only limestone and has no additives. You can put maybe a cup or so in a mesh bag and hang it in the tank next to the filter outflow, or in the filter itself if it is a canister type with room. You can also mix it in the substrate, but this means you won't be able to remove it should you want to.

Salt can be used with molly, though it is not necessary. Many incorrectly assume "salt" equates with "hardness" but it does not. Salt does not add any mineral to water except sodium, and this has no effect on water hardness. In fact, many home water softeeners "soften" water with salt, as the salt (sodium) removes the calcium and magnesium that hardens the water. So do the above hardening first.

Second pint on salt is that it has to be marine salt. Table salt should never, never be puyt in a fish tank. It probably contains substances to keep it free-running, and it usually has too much iodine ("iodized salt"). "Aquarium salt" is also not the same thing as marine salt. For permanent braqckish water (part salt/part fresh) you want marine salt. If you want it at all; as I said, it is not necessary.

Third, if only molly are in the tank, the marine salt is OK (not necessary, but not problematic either). But other livebearers should not be exposed to salt long-term. I know there are others who will not agree with me on this, fine. The bottom line is that no freshwater fish live in water containing any degree of salt, aside from those few species like molly that do occur in brackish estuary waters for a portion--but not all--of their lives. There is no point in subjecting freshwater fish to something that nature never intended when she designed them.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Byron For This Useful Post:
Chesh (03-11-2012)
Old 03-11-2012, 01:05 PM   #24
 
Chesh's Avatar
 
Thanks for the advice! My crazy Mollies just had babies last night, so now I've a whole SLEW of them to learn how to keep happy :) VERY neat stuff!

Back to the lights. I tried the standard-sized bulbs, and they don't fit. The actual part that you screw in fits fine, but there is a plastic casing around it, and the mechanical part of the lights are too big to fit in. I went to Home Depot, and the only thing that they have (in stock anyway) that will fit are these:

Is this a decent option for the plants in the tank? The rating on these is 5,000K, and they are daylight. 40 watt equivalent. The ones suggested by Byron were 6,500k. . . would these not be strong enough? Or should I go ahead and get an actual fish tank light? I asked for the GE bulbs that were mentioned, but they didn't carry them. Though they didnt' seem to know what I was talking about, I didn't find anything by that brand at all. Maybe I'd have better luck at Lowes?

Last edited by Chesh; 03-11-2012 at 01:11 PM..
Chesh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2012, 02:17 PM   #25
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chesherca View Post
Thanks for the advice! My crazy Mollies just had babies last night, so now I've a whole SLEW of them to learn how to keep happy :) VERY neat stuff!

Back to the lights. I tried the standard-sized bulbs, and they don't fit. The actual part that you screw in fits fine, but there is a plastic casing around it, and the mechanical part of the lights are too big to fit in. I went to Home Depot, and the only thing that they have (in stock anyway) that will fit are these:

Is this a decent option for the plants in the tank? The rating on these is 5,000K, and they are daylight. 40 watt equivalent. The ones suggested by Byron were 6,500k. . . would these not be strong enough? Or should I go ahead and get an actual fish tank light? I asked for the GE bulbs that were mentioned, but they didn't carry them. Though they didnt' seem to know what I was talking about, I didn't find anything by that brand at all. Maybe I'd have better luck at Lowes?
Those will work. The hue will be a bit warmer (Kelvin is the colour temp of light, and the lower number is warmer with more red, the higher number is cooler with more blue and less red) but the plants will be fine.

Various stores carry certain brands. My HD here carries Phillips, used to be Sylvania. I have a similar store called Canadian Tire and they carry GE. No Lowe's in Vancouver so not sure what they have. If you can find the GE daylight at 6500K, I myself would use it, but as I said, it is a matter of colour and the 5000K will be warmer but still fine for plants.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Byron For This Useful Post:
Chesh (03-11-2012)
Old 03-11-2012, 03:17 PM   #26
 
Chesh's Avatar
 
Awesome! Thank you! I'll check and see what Lowe's has, but at least I know that these would work if they don't have anything better. You've been fantastically helpful!
Chesh is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
To much light or to much nutrients? bigfish93 Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 11 10-20-2011 08:14 AM
Lack of light or nutrients? gmyers0203 Beginner Planted Aquarium 5 07-09-2011 10:26 AM
nutrients for plants stephanieleah Beginner Planted Aquarium 8 02-20-2010 11:35 PM
Waterflow, nutrients mrdemin Beginner Planted Aquarium 11 11-17-2009 07:00 PM
Light and air questions Dtld9 Beginner Planted Aquarium 8 03-16-2008 01:37 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:24 AM.