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Plants turning brown

This is a discussion on Plants turning brown within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Originally Posted by Byron Of the tubes mentioned, the 10,000K Daylight will be the best. So they cannot be taken out and replaced? What ...

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Old 05-13-2013, 05:45 PM   #11
 
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Of the tubes mentioned, the 10,000K Daylight will be the best. So they cannot be taken out and replaced? What happens when they burn out (as all tubes do eventually)?

GH you can ascertain from your municipal water people, they likely have a website. If you find it and can't figure it out, as these water data charts are sometimes confusing to many of us, post the link and one of us will look.

Byron.
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I found San Diego water data:
| Public Utilities: Water

It says the GH is 263 ppm, which is 14 d GH. This is "fairly hard" to use a subjective term. So there is certainly no shortage of the "hard" minerals, which is fine for most plants.

A photo of the tank so I can see the plants, to ID the species and also the issue, will help later.

Byron.
It might not be tell tonight because ill be at school all day for football. But you said it's normal for some browning?
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Old 05-13-2013, 06:09 PM   #12
 
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It might not be tell tonight because ill be at school all day for football. But you said it's normal for some browning?
Well, it depends. A day won't hurt, if you can get some photos posted tomorrow we will have a much better idea of what you are talking about with "browning."

But yes, when plants are moved to a new environment, loss of some existing leaves is common on certain species. But it might also be due to something missing (nutrients, light) or too much light. There has to be a balance between light and all 17 nutrients in order for plants to grow (by photosynthesis).

Byron.
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Old 05-13-2013, 06:39 PM   #13
 
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Figured out how to post photos :)
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Old 05-13-2013, 06:41 PM   #14
 
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And another
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Old 05-13-2013, 06:42 PM   #15
 
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I wish they weren't so big
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Old 05-13-2013, 07:15 PM   #16
 
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Nothing to worry about there.

In the first photos, the small sword plant, does that "brown" rub off at all? It looks like it might be diatoms, or what some call brown algae, which can appear in newish tanks. Or it might be true algae.
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Old 05-13-2013, 07:24 PM   #17
 
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Ill try rubbing it off at home. Do you know what plant the large one is because the smaller ones are just runners? Do you think the brown on the larger plant is bad?
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Old 05-13-2013, 07:37 PM   #18
 
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Ill try rubbing it off at home. Do you know what plant the large one is because the smaller ones are just runners? Do you think the brown on the larger plant is bad?
The species is Echinodorus bleherae, it is the most common "amazon sword" plant and a very lovely plant too.

The brown on the larger is fine, that was from the past. Now, as this plant adjusts, new leaves will appear from the centre of the crown, and the older existing leaves will all slowly yellow. Leave them for the present, until there are several new leaves that are fairly large, at which point you can remove the yellowing ones.

Some nutrients are what we term mobile; these will move within the plant, as from dying leaves to new leaves, so the new leaf is better fed with that nutrient. As these plants are newly introduced, it is best to leave the yellowing leaves (when they occur) for a time so the plant benefits from the mobile nutrients stored in those leaves.

Something else that really helps this species are substrate tabs, such as Seachem's Flourish Tabs. Just one inserted into the substrate an inch or two from the plant crown will last 3 months and provide additional nutrients to the roots. Echinodorus plants are heavy feeders, meaning they use a lot of nutrients compared to some other plants. Not essential, but you will see a difference.
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Old 05-13-2013, 07:43 PM   #19
 
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The species is Echinodorus bleherae, it is the most common "amazon sword" plant and a very lovely plant too.

The brown on the larger is fine, that was from the past. Now, as this plant adjusts, new leaves will appear from the centre of the crown, and the older existing leaves will all slowly yellow. Leave them for the present, until there are several new leaves that are fairly large, at which point you can remove the yellowing ones.

Some nutrients are what we term mobile; these will move within the plant, as from dying leaves to new leaves, so the new leaf is better fed with that nutrient. As these plants are newly introduced, it is best to leave the yellowing leaves (when they occur) for a time so the plant benefits from the mobile nutrients stored in those leaves.

Something else that really helps this species are substrate tabs, such as Seachem's Flourish Tabs. Just one inserted into the substrate an inch or two from the plant crown will last 3 months and provide additional nutrients to the roots. Echinodorus plants are heavy feeders, meaning they use a lot of nutrients compared to some other plants. Not essential, but you will see a difference.

Was thinking about doing the tabs but I'm afraid the swords will take over the whole tank. Should I completely bury the roots of the swords.
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Old 05-13-2013, 07:47 PM   #20
 
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Was thinking about doing the tabs but I'm afraid the swords will take over the whole tank. Should I completely bury the roots of the swords.
Yes.
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