plants for dicus tank - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 16 Old 11-04-2006, 09:04 AM
All my tanks are kept at 82°F (28°C). The discus and plants seem to do fine.
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post #12 of 16 Old 11-05-2006, 12:33 AM
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The thing I'd be looking for is TOO MUCH light. Java fern tends to be a lower light plant, so be sure to shade it with other plants that thrive on higher light. I have grown java fern in 84 degree temps and had it thrive, my husband has had it thrive at up to 86 degrees.
I would not suggest lowering the tank temp, especially for discus.
Blue, I know you say your discus are thriving at lower temps, but I wanted to warn you that this is like playing with a time bomb. Long term you can cause damage to the organs of the fish if they don't have the needed environment, and this includes temperature. At the very least, you will most likely shorten their life span this way and the lower temp leaves them more prone to parasite problems in the future. Discus don't have a very strong immune system and the higher temps help to avoid many of the common illness problems, like ick. Lowering the temps leaves them very vulnerable.

Dawn Moneyhan
Aquatics Specialist/Nutritionist
Juneau, WI
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post #13 of 16 Old 11-07-2006, 02:52 PM
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i wouldnt say java fern is a shady plant, yes it can grow in low light, but what you can achieve with this plant under high light and through plenty of CO2, it become a glorious plant producing no end of O2 bubbles, i havent planted mine in the shade , its nearer to the light than any other plant in my tank and it loves it, its keeps on growing which makes me very happy as i love this plant. Just wish the hair grass would grow as well as the java.
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post #14 of 16 Old 11-07-2006, 05:28 PM
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Java fern is one of the few plants that can thrive in brackish water, if acclimated slowly over a long period of times. It's preferred lighting is lower light. Being out in the open does not constitute lower light, it's a matter of what kind of light and how powerful that light is. As with any other plant, it relies on spectrum as much as intensity. The depth of the tank will make a lot of difference, too. The same light put over 2 tanks.. example of 15 gallon long vs 15 gallon tall. Same light but more intensity over the 15 long because the tank is shallower.

Dawn Moneyhan
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Juneau, WI
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post #15 of 16 Old 08-18-2009, 07:57 PM
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we have a 90 gal. discus tank which we have African Lillys and Anopogetons which we sell so they always worked well in higher temps.....visit our web site @Home - Aponolily
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post #16 of 16 Old 08-19-2009, 11:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bettababy View Post
The thing I'd be looking for is TOO MUCH light. Java fern tends to be a lower light plant, so be sure to shade it with other plants that thrive on higher light. I have grown java fern in 84 degree temps and had it thrive, my husband has had it thrive at up to 86 degrees.
I would not suggest lowering the tank temp, especially for discus.
Blue, I know you say your discus are thriving at lower temps, but I wanted to warn you that this is like playing with a time bomb. Long term you can cause damage to the organs of the fish if they don't have the needed environment, and this includes temperature. At the very least, you will most likely shorten their life span this way and the lower temp leaves them more prone to parasite problems in the future. Discus don't have a very strong immune system and the higher temps help to avoid many of the common illness problems, like ick. Lowering the temps leaves them very vulnerable.
I certainly concur with this advice on temperature (and on the JF too, but am here commenting on the temp issue). Temperature has a huge impact on a fish's metabolism, growth and health. Fish are poikilothermic, "cold-blooded" with their body temperature corresponding directly with that of the water they live in. Metabolism quickens as water gets warmer, and slows as it gets cooler. And the metabolism rate determines how fast the cells can convert food into energy and otherwise function. Cooling their environment beyond what nature has programmed them for is, put bluntly, tampering with nature and as Dawn says,only asking for eventual problems. The preferred temperature of any fish is the temperature that exists in its native habitat, just as with the preferred pH, hardness and salinity. Breeding fish in tanks in differing water parameters may in time have some effect on these preferences, but I tend to think it is minimal at best; fish have been programmed over millions of years and I am highly skeptical that this internal "blueprint" can be altered significantly in a few generations. I do not think the health of the fish is worth risking, especially when there is no need.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youre going to take it under your wing then youre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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